The Practice of Mindfulness

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adosa
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby adosa » Thu Oct 08, 2009 10:56 pm

"To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas" - Dhammapada 183

jhana.achariya

Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby jhana.achariya » Fri Oct 09, 2009 3:33 am


rowyourboat
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby rowyourboat » Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:14 am

Hi Jhana acarya

Mindfulness and clear comprehension is clearly defined by the Buddha in the quote I posted, and in the first paragraph of the samadhi sutta quote you posted. However the second paragraph refers to the ending of effluents (aasava)- ie full enlightenment. The practice mentioned in that leads to (mostly) insight by focusing on the five aggregates, in a framework approaching that of the four noble truths (object, origin, passing away--complete release from object). This is appropriate as ignorance is the last fetter to be lost.

I agree that clear comphrehension (mindfulness of arising, persisting and subsiding of the four foundations) will eventually lead to non-grasping and the other qualities you mentioned.

I am not trying to be pedantic here! I think we need to have consensus when we use a technical term from the suttas otherwise communication can flounder. :smile:

In my opinion vipassana begins when we are knowing and seeing the one of the three characteristics and it is leading to even minor degrees of detachment through insight. Anything other than this can be just a samatha/tranquility process. It helps to be clear about what it is not:
Vipassana is not mindfulness (mindfulness alone can lead to samatha)
Vipassana is not watching an impermanent object (doesnt necessarily mean that the observer is grasping that insight)
Vipassana is not watching multiple objects (that also can lead to just samatha)
Vipassana is not synonymous with satipatthana (it contains the seeds of developing both samatha and vipassana)

I think it is important to be clear about what vipassana is otherwise we may do one thing thinking it is something else.

Vipassana can be reached rather quickly and reliably by using a contemplation/yonisomanasikara.

Discursive thoughts in vipassana are best dealt by developing samatha samadhi to a deep degree (ideally jhanic). This will make the process a lot smoother- any insights will sink in deeper-the process will be faster. Also if using a yonisomanasikara method it will stop the contemplation from becoming merely discursive thinking.

with metta

RYB

Matheesha

with metta
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha

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christopher:::
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby christopher::: » Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:22 pm

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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adosa
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby adosa » Fri Oct 09, 2009 11:27 pm

"To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas" - Dhammapada 183

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christopher:::
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby christopher::: » Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:12 am

LOL... well, i know just what you mean...

And i agree, for most of us this is a gradual training process, and its these kinds of challenges and experiences that really provide the nitty gritty focus. I like Joseph Goldstein's dhamma talks for this reason. For almost every principle of practice he provides a story from his own life where the truth of that principle became clear..

One thing that has become apparent to me recently has been the importance of prioritizing upekkha, the cultivation of equanimity. During phases where i make serenity a priority it becomes easier to say no to old habits which may seem exciting or fun, but which actually create more suffering.

Noticing this- as you did last night with the football game- is a BiG step on the path, imo. So, it sounds to me like your "practice" is going well, in that your understanding is deepening, even as you cycle thru old patterns that create suffering...

Sometimes we just have to do that until we get sick of the old ways.

:computerproblem: :buddha1: :meditate:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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pink_trike
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby pink_trike » Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:37 am

Vision is Mind
Mind is Empty
Emptiness is Clear Light
Clear Light is Union
Union is Great Bliss

- Dawa Gyaltsen

---

Disclaimer: I'm a non-religious practitioner of Theravada, Mahayana/Vajrayana, and Tibetan Bon Dzogchen mind-training.

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christopher:::
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby christopher::: » Sun Oct 18, 2009 3:59 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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chicka-Dee
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby chicka-Dee » Sat Oct 24, 2009 10:34 pm


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catmoon
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby catmoon » Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:32 am






1. Go to shrine.
2. Dust. Wipe down if necessary
3. Place offerings.
4. Light candles in the order #1, light #2 from #1, #3 from #2 etc in a chain.
5. Light incense from last candle


Notice that like spreading Dharma, the flame has travelled from one candle to the next, and the end result is fragrant incense burning.
When placing offerings be sure the bowls are clean and orderly.

Pause before Buddha statue with folded hands. Consider the meaning of what you have done. I tend to ponder that the statue has no more Buddha nature than any other rock, but you will ponder something else I imagine.

Now if all this is done slowly and carefully, avoiding spills and mess, a funny thing happens. The ritual ends in perhaps 5 minutes, but the mindfulness continues, sometimes for hours.

Please note the method is patented. Each time you use it, send me $5. :tongue:

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christopher:::
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby christopher::: » Sun Oct 25, 2009 5:27 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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chicka-Dee
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby chicka-Dee » Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:29 pm


Sanghamitta
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby Sanghamitta » Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:44 pm

The notion of Aatta or Atman may well have led to all sorts of social injustice Chicka-Dee. However the Buddhas teaching of Anatta was not merely a political statement. He meant it, no abiding permenant self. That is the teaching, or so I believe of the Theravada.
The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.

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chicka-Dee
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby chicka-Dee » Sun Oct 25, 2009 6:50 pm


Sanghamitta
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby Sanghamitta » Sun Oct 25, 2009 7:26 pm

I think you are posing a problem which doesnt really exist Chicka-Dee. The way to verify the truth of the Buddhas teaching is certainly by practice, but what is verified isnt some intellectual speculation. What is verified is what the Buddha taught in the Canon. We dont in the Theravada just hang experience on proofs of our own devising. What I am trying to say is that it is not a question of experience OR an intellectual understanding, Its both, and that the intellectual understanding isnt just subjective, it is the result of absorbing the teachings of the last Buddha of the age, whose words we are fortunate enough to still have readily available to us.
Last edited by Sanghamitta on Sun Oct 25, 2009 8:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.

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chicka-Dee
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Re: The Practice of Mindfulness

Postby chicka-Dee » Sun Oct 25, 2009 7:48 pm



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