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"The Broken Buddha" by Ven.Dhammika and other scandals - Page 2 - Dhamma Wheel

"The Broken Buddha" by Ven.Dhammika and other scandals

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby poto » Fri Nov 13, 2009 4:30 pm


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Nov 13, 2009 4:43 pm


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby poto » Fri Nov 13, 2009 5:44 pm


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Vardali » Fri Nov 13, 2009 6:39 pm


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Nov 13, 2009 6:42 pm

Ven. Dhammika has raised some issues similar to this topic in today's post (Nov. 13, 2009):

http://sdhammika.blogspot.com/
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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Nov 13, 2009 6:51 pm

Not responding to any particular poster/post but some things I have noticed are that some predominantly non-Asian groups sometimes completely adopt an Asian culture in their practice. For example, some Soto / Rinzai Zen centers I have visited in the past where the chanting is done in Japanese, meditators wear robes, etc.

And then there are some predominantly Asian temples where the atmosphere is more "Western" in terms of culture. When looking at the different practices it is probably best to notice the differences based on Sutta interpretation, etc. and for this there is wide variation among all communities. See also what I wrote here recently:

http://dhammawiki.com/index.php?title=Western_Buddhism
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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 13, 2009 7:58 pm


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Perry » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:14 pm

I am a newbie on the subject compared to the majority (if not all) of you, but I would look to add that my local temple does double as a sort-of community centre for Sri Lankans in Letchworth Garden City and surrounding areas.

Even so, I was made most welcome as a Westerner and Bhante Samitha has been incredibly accommodating and understanding of my relative recentness in Buddhism.

Anyway, thanks for the reply, I've been a bit busy the past few days so haven't gone beyond the introduction but will definitely continue reading.

Thanks everyone.

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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:33 pm

Thanks Perry,

That's my experience with my local Thai and Sri Lankan temples. They obviously cater to their community, but are very welcoming to anyone.

Perhaps when the level of support from the "non-ethnics" approaches that from the "ethnic community" they will become more "westernised". At present I "get" much more than I "give", I think.

It's a tricky problem. The Western Ajahn Chah monestaries are, to a large extent, possible because they automatically draw in "ethnic" support from Thai and Sri Lankan communities. When we have Ajahn Tiradhammo here for a retreat the Thai restaurants are falling over each other to provide lunch boxes for the participants so they have a chance to give Dana to a distinguished Ajahn...

Metta
Mike

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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby poto » Sat Nov 14, 2009 12:09 am


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Nov 14, 2009 12:30 am


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby poto » Sat Nov 14, 2009 1:15 am


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Dan74 » Sat Nov 14, 2009 2:04 am

_/|\_

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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby BlackBird » Sat Nov 14, 2009 2:26 am

I don't think bowing, or wearing modest clothing are superfluous at all, they were both around in the Buddha's time and have in my eyes quite important functions. It might be better to turn this around and ask why people think that bowing and wearing modest clothing isn't important? Why it's not worthy of being practised?

With regards to the actual superfluous rites and rituals - That have crept in over the centuries, such as holy water, incense, flowers etc - They provide for those who are simply concerned with faith and making merit - Which is probably a great degree of the Thai population, for example.

Don't underestimate the power of these simple things to bring some happiness to someone's day. When I was staying at Bodhinyanarama, a Thai lady brought her Cambodian neighbour in one day - They brought some food for lunch and came up to the Sala to receive a blessing. The Cambodian lady's story was quite heartbreaking. My friend Stepan told me her husband was a Kiwi who knew Cambodian and had gone over there and brought her back. His previous wife was a Thai lady, who had broken it off with him earlier. This time around the hubby thought he had it sussed, and kept his wife on a very tight leash - He wouldn't let her out of the house, she didn't know how to speak English or anything. Then he got sick, and died. His wife didn't even know where her passport was, nor any of her papers, she didn't know who to turn to after that, not being able to speak English. Luckily her neighbour (a Thai lady) could speak some Cambodian, so she was helping her out.

This lady was obviously in quite a state and situation. With no way of getting help and fear that if she sought help she might be deported.

When the monks chanted the blessing, got her to pour the holy water and administered her the 5 precepts, I could see the tears rolling down her face, she didn't have anything in this strange world, but the joy that those rituals brought her was enough to provide some comfort, that's all she wanted - some comfort, some reassurance.

It made me think that not everyone's ready to strive for Nibbana. But that Buddhism has something to offer everyone. I say if rituals bring people happiness then that's fine, the problem in my eyes is when Buddhism is simply reduced to ritualism, not the acts unto themselves. Let's not chuck the baby out with the bathwater as they say.

metta
Jack
Last edited by BlackBird on Sat Nov 14, 2009 4:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." -

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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby BlackBird » Sat Nov 14, 2009 2:33 am

I would also like to make it clear that I mean no disrespect Poto
:anjali: and metta to you

Jack
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." -

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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Nov 14, 2009 3:33 am


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby poto » Sat Nov 14, 2009 5:03 am


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby zavk » Sat Nov 14, 2009 6:12 am

With metta,
zavk

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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby poto » Sat Nov 14, 2009 7:33 am


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Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

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