Four/two postures

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
User avatar
Cittasanto
Posts: 5953
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Location: Ellan Vannin
Contact:

Four/two postures

Postby Cittasanto » Wed Dec 02, 2009 1:07 am

Hi All,
any sutta references for and links to advice on the practice of these postures/actions found in the satipatthana sutta?

"Furthermore, when going forward & returning, he makes himself fully alert; when looking toward & looking away... when bending & extending his limbs... when carrying his outer cloak, his upper robe & his bowl... when eating, drinking, chewing, & savoring... when urinating & defecating... when walking, standing, sitting, falling asleep, waking up, talking, & remaining silent, he makes himself fully alert.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

User avatar
retrofuturist
Site Admin
Posts: 15112
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: Four/two postures

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Dec 02, 2009 3:35 am

Greetings Manapa,

Yes. The Satipatthana Sutta says that one must do these things "fully alert". ;)

Sure, the Buddha gave instructions on being dispassionate about food (as recently discussed elsewhere) but in the context of satipatthana, it's the "fully alert" that is the significant aspect... the postures are noted just a list of possible everyday actions and configurations of the body.

They are by no means exhaustve, hence the concluding refrain "Or however his body is disposed, that is how he discerns it. In this way he remains focused internally on the body in & of itself, or focused externally... unsustained by anything in the world. This is how a monk remains focused on the body in & of itself."

Metta,
Retro. :)
“Delighting in existence O monks, are gods and men; they are attached to existence. they revel in existence. When the Dhamma for the cessation of existence is being preached to them, their minds do not leap towards it, do not get pleased with it, do not get settled in it, do not find confidence in it. That is how, monks, some lag behind … (It. p 43)”

Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 11295
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Four/two postures

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Dec 02, 2009 3:59 am

Hi Manapa,
Manapa wrote:any sutta references for and links to advice on the practice of these postures/actions found in the satipatthana sutta?

I guess you mean more detail, since the Satipatthana Sutta is a Sutta reference... :thinking:

I don't know of more detail, but I could point out that this instruction is in the Suttas that discuss the "gradual training", such as MN 107: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .horn.html
...
Vigilance
"As soon, brahman, as a monk is moderate in eating, the Tathagata disciplines him further, saying: 'Come you, monk, dwell intent on vigilance; during the day while pacing up and down, while sitting down, cleanse the mind of obstructive mental states; during the middle watch of the night, lie down on the right side in the lion posture, foot resting on foot, mindful, clearly conscious, reflecting on the thought of getting up again; during the last watch of the night, when you have arisen, while pacing up and down, while sitting down, cleanse the mind of obstructive mental states.'
Mindfulness and clear consciousness
"As soon, brahman, as a monk is intent on vigilance, the Tathagata disciplines him further, saying: 'Come you, monk, be possessed of mindfulness and clear consciousness, acting with clear consciousness whether you are approaching or departing, acting with clear consciousness whether you are looking ahead or looking round, acting with clear consciousness whether you are bending in or stretching out [the arms], acting with clear consciousness whether you are carrying the outer cloak, the bowl or robe, acting with clear consciousness whether you are eating, drinking, munching, savoring, acting with clear consciousness whether you are obeying the calls of nature, acting with clear consciousness whether you are walking, standing, sitting, asleep, awake, talking or being silent.'
Overcoming of the five hindrances
...

See also the Satipatthana Samyutta, of which there is a selection here:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .html#sn47

Mike

User avatar
Cittasanto
Posts: 5953
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Location: Ellan Vannin
Contact:

Re: Four/two postures

Postby Cittasanto » Wed Dec 02, 2009 1:15 pm

mikenz66 wrote:Hi Manapa,
Manapa wrote:any sutta references for and links to advice on the practice of these postures/actions found in the satipatthana sutta?

I guess you mean more detail, since the Satipatthana Sutta is a Sutta reference... :thinking:

LOL :jumping:

I have the BB collection of the samyutta

There are specific trainings or teachings for eating, and walking, which I know of but are there any for the rest? such as the falling asleep or waking up, in the Sarvastivadin version it is changed to while asleep, and is mentioned another time, but I don't know specific teachings or trainings for the them.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."


Return to “Theravada Meditation”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine