Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

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mikenz66
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Re: Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 20, 2009 7:36 pm


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David N. Snyder
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Re: Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Nov 20, 2009 7:48 pm

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mikenz66
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Re: Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 20, 2009 8:02 pm


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Dhammanando
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Re: Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

Postby Dhammanando » Sat Nov 21, 2009 4:39 am


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David N. Snyder
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Re: Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

Postby David N. Snyder » Sat Nov 21, 2009 5:18 am

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Laurens
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Re: Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

Postby Laurens » Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:21 pm

I heard Ajahn Jayasaro mention that even being an arahant does not necessarily make one a good teacher, if you aren't the kind of person that can teach people anyway, realising the Dhamma doesn't mean that you would suddenly have the ability to be a great teacher.

I guess this means a good teacher is a good teacher, regardless of where they are on the path.
"For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring."

Carl Sagan

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Cittasanto
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Re: Attainment as Qualification to Teach?

Postby Cittasanto » Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:36 pm



He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.


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