MN Session 1 - MN 26. Ariyapariyesanā Sutta

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Re: MN Session 1 - MN 26. Ariyapariyesanā Sutta

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Jan 22, 2009 5:12 am

this is interesting... how do you even find out who dropped or who added?

i guess it would seem absurd to add gold and silver...
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat

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Re: MN Session 1 - MN 26. Ariyapariyesanā Sutta

Postby gavesako » Fri Jan 23, 2009 7:06 pm

Thanissaro Bhikkhu's talk about the Noble Search:

http://www.dhammatalks.org/Archive/040319%20Life%20Crises.mp3

"What is really worth searching for in life?"


(My own Pali name also comes from this Sutta, by the way... see my signature.) :idea:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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Re: MN Session 1 - MN 26. Ariyapariyesanā Sutta

Postby Chiyo » Sat Jan 24, 2009 1:55 am

Hi, Everyone -

Regretfully, I don't have anything of substance to add. Quite the opposite, actually, I'm here as a student with a lot to learn. Probably, I'm going to be all eyes and ears, you won't hear from me much. And in that light, I just wanted to take the opportunity to thank everyone for their offerings and participation - I'm grateful and look forward to learning from all of you.

Many thanks.
The sound of rain needs no translation. - Roshi Morimoto

Do not see the full realization in one teaching, one phenomena, one body, one land or one sentient being. You should see the full realization everywhere, in all places. - Sakyamuni Buddha

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very beginning of Sutta

Postby Jesse Smith » Mon Jan 26, 2009 7:58 pm

Here's are a few phrases from the very beginning of the sutta. Any insight on their significance would be appreciated.

1. Ananda refers to Rammaka's hermitage as "pleasing" and "delightful". He then says it would be good if the Buddha went there "out of sympathy". Does Ananda call the hermitage "pleasing" because he knows a group of bhikkus will gather there with the wish to hear the Dhamma?

2. The Buddha "acquiesced through silence." Is there any significance to this rather than a verbal "yes"?

3. "So the Blessed One went to the hermitage of Rammaka the brahman. Now at that time a large number of monks had gathered in the hermitage of Rammaka the brahman for a Dhamma discussion. The Blessed One stood outside the door waiting for the discussion to end. On knowing that the discussion had ended, clearing his throat, he tapped at the door. The monks opened the door for him. Entering the hermitage of Rammaka the brahman, the Blessed One sat down on a seat made ready. As he was sitting there, he addressed the monks: "For what discussion are you gathered together here? In the midst of what discussion have you been interrupted?"

"Lord, our interrupted Dhamma discussion was about the Blessed One himself, and then the Blessed One arrived."

So there is already a Dhamma discussion going on among the Bhikkus themselves. The Buddha waits for it to "end", but the sutta further goes on to say the Buddha knows it has ended. Then the discussion is described as having been "interrupted". When I first read this sutta, I was expecting the bhikkus to say, "No, you have not interrupted the discussion. It has ended." Is this just one particular subject of their discussion had ended, and a pause in the discussion was taking place?

4. The Buddha clears his throat and taps on the door. This whole sequence of waiting for the discussion to end, knowing it has ended, clearing his throat, and tapping on the door seems like an intentionally formal process. It seems like there's some significance in how it is presented, perhaps an example of how an introduction or approach to the Dhamma is to be conducted.

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Re: MN Session 1 - MN 26. Ariyapariyesanā Sutta

Postby adeh » Tue Jan 27, 2009 3:08 am

I think the episode displays the Buddha's great respect for the Dhamma, His not wanting to interrupt a discussion on the Dhamma.

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Re: MN Session 1 - MN 26. Ariyapariyesanā Sutta

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jan 27, 2009 3:13 am

Greetings Jesse,

In response to your above selections of text, here are my thoughts...

1. I think he's just suggesting they go there, but without wanting to direct the Buddha about what to do

2. No particularly... that's just how it happened back in the day

3/4. Perhaps this means that he was waiting for a break in the conversation. If there is any Dhammic significance I would just put it down to politeness.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)

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Re: MN Session 1 - MN 26. Ariyapariyesanā Sutta

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:47 pm

Greetings,

:reading:

This study session is now closed.

If you wish to pursue anything further in relation to this sutta, please start a new topic in the appropriate sub-form.

If you have any comments or suggestions regarding the process, please place them in the pinned thread in the Study Group forum for that purpose.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)


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