Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

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Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby christopher::: » Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:44 am

I was listening to this dhamma talk by Joseph Goldstein the other day: Factors Of Awakening: Tranquility (2008-04-11). One thing he mentioned near the end is that as tranquility (upekkha) is cultivated desires naturally diminish.

And i realized, looking back, that the times when i felt calmest in my life and practice were also times when i ate well, and was thin. I wonder, is this a relationship others here have noticed as well, that the more tranquil you are the more healthy you feel and the less you find yourself filled with desire for food?

If so, it would seem that dhamma practice, and specifically the cultivation of upekkha (probably in tandem with mindfulness while eating) would be the best way to address diet or weight issues related to unhealthy eating.

:popcorn:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby Ben » Wed Mar 10, 2010 11:30 am

Hi Chrisopher

Don't forget exercise as well.
metta

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Re: Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby christopher::: » Wed Mar 10, 2010 11:42 am

Ben wrote:Don't forget exercise as well.


Hi Ben.

I've exercised pretty regularly since junior high school, walking daily and working out twice a week at a minimum. The stretches of healthy eating and weight loss did not correspond with greater exercise (or meditation) as far as i can recall so much as greater calm and mindfulness. I did do yoga more regularly though at certain points. I'm trying to recall if that corresponded with the periods of calm and reduction of cravings- it may have....

I've put on weight the last 10 years, while still exercising (minus the yoga), but definitely with an increase in subtle anxiety, less tranquility as compared with the pre-children years...

Has your experience been similar, or different?

:anjali:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby appicchato » Wed Mar 10, 2010 11:56 am

christopher::: wrote:One thing he mentioned near the end is that as tranquility (upekkha) is cultivated desires naturally diminish.

Upekkha is equanimity, not tranquility...
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Re: Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby christopher::: » Wed Mar 10, 2010 12:48 pm

appicchato wrote:
christopher::: wrote:One thing he mentioned near the end is that as tranquility (upekkha) is cultivated desires naturally diminish.

Upekkha is equanimity, not tranquility...


Thank you bhante. I must admit, i do get equanimity and tranquility confused. I'll listen again to the dharma talk. Can you recommend any resources which makes the difference clear, or that discuss the relationship of upekkha or passaddhi with detachment from desires?

:anjali:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby appicchato » Wed Mar 10, 2010 1:49 pm

Hi Chris,

Equanimity is upekkha...tranquility is samatha...pretty straightforward I would think...being equanimous is not the same as being tranquil...(http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/palidict.pdf)...at the moment I can't readily recall any discussions that I've seen pertaining to the second part of your question...
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Re: Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby christopher::: » Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:14 pm

That's an excellent resource. I posted a question about this in another discussion.
Thank you so much.

:anjali:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009
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Re: Dharma & Diet: Tranquility & Desire

Postby Calahand » Wed Mar 31, 2010 4:41 pm

christopher::: wrote:And i realized, looking back, that the times when i felt calmest in my life and practice were also times when i ate well, and was thin. I wonder, is this a relationship others here have noticed as well, that the more tranquil you are the more healthy you feel and the less you find yourself filled with desire for food?

:popcorn:


I think it has to do with the lack of stress. if you are peaceful, then you are less stressful, you are not releasing hormones like cortisol in your body that might make you agitated, angry or increase hunger or kill brain cells for that matter. what I noticed is my blood pressure drops when I meditate and my heart rate slows down. So maybe the heart and the body isn't working so hard when you are relaxed, which helps with feeling healthy.
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