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Question to Ben - Dhamma Wheel

Question to Ben

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
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Modus.Ponens
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Question to Ben

Postby Modus.Ponens » Thu Mar 11, 2010 3:01 am

Hi

I did a Goenka retreat a few years ago and a doubt arises now. We were told to observe anicca as we observed the sensations. But how exactly is this done? I inicialy tried to observe anicca in every sensation I had, but that was becoming an obstacle. So I spoke to the teacher and he said we should only remember at times to observe anicca, not at every moment. Is this correct Ben?

Metta
He turns his mind away from those phenomena, and having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.'
(Jhana Sutta - Thanissaro Bhikkhu translation)

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Ben
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Re: Question to Ben

Postby Ben » Thu Mar 11, 2010 5:14 am

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

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BlackBird
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Re: Question to Ben

Postby BlackBird » Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:22 am

"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." -

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BubbaBuddhist
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Re: Question to Ben

Postby BubbaBuddhist » Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:25 pm

Yes, pain is very interesting, as it is not one sensation at all, but a bewildering variety of sensations. And many of these sensations, on examinations, are linked to memories, fears, past experiences, so when you begin examining what you first thought was a simple pain, you find yourself lost in a jungle. But very educational.

I had ample time to explore this after my vasectomy a few years ago. I had a "complication," in the form of an undefended item which involved yanking and pulling to execute the procedure. Imagine a pulled ligament applied to the item under discussion. Add to my misfortune an allergic reaction to percosette, so I couldn't take my painkillers. So I had to grin and bear it. For four days. All males now say ouch. To paraphrase Pinhead, the pain I experienced was legendary even in Hell. I took full advantage of the opportunity to learn from it. One thing I learned: The phrase the doctors use: "Mild discomfort," HAH!

J
Author of Redneck Buddhism: or Will You Reincarnate as Your Own Cousin?

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Modus.Ponens
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Re: Question to Ben

Postby Modus.Ponens » Thu Mar 11, 2010 4:39 pm

Thank you Ben :)

Jack: Yes. I had that insight during the retreat. That pain was not suffering, it's the aversion to pain that is suffering. Suffering was optional. But then there's the other side of the coin: pleasant sensations were not happiness, they were also suffering when assossiated with craving. I got this insight on the 6th or 7th day and got very dismotivated. The rest of the retreat I was a bit lazy because of the disapointment I had, knowing I couldn't obtain happiness the way I usualy did.
PS: your comments and those of others are very welcome.

Metta
He turns his mind away from those phenomena, and having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.'
(Jhana Sutta - Thanissaro Bhikkhu translation)


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