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Use of Mantra - Dhamma Wheel

Use of Mantra

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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JKPenumbra
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Use of Mantra

Postby JKPenumbra » Thu Mar 11, 2010 9:18 pm

I've decided to make a commitment to meditate every day, for a minimum of 1 hour. I have done so for the past couple of days, and had been thinking of increasing the amount of time spent doing so. I will add walking meditation eventually, but for now I haven't. I do notice my mind has calmed, most noticeably so directly after, and it is easier in day to day life to stay present (though I do go off in thoughts a lot)

I realllly didn't want to meditate today, but I managed to go do it, as I'm going to stick to this resolution, and I did so for about an hour and a half.

I read something earlier today, and was wondering if it were true --
"Of course, we make use of words in order to convey the idea, but at the time of doing it, it is out of question to use words, neither verbally, nor mentally except for the fresh beginners whom it can help. Quickly, one must stop all this, and simply turn his attention to reality and know it as it is."

Is this how it should be?

and, ""When a sound does manifest, only know what is heard. When a sight does occur, only know what is seen. When there is a smell, only know what is smelt. When there is a taste, only know what is tasted. When there is a mental object, only know what is thought."

Does this mean, for instance that I would focus on what the object that I was smelling was? Or, that I was simply smelling, and let my mind only be consumed by the thought of the sensation of smelling? These small details still confuse me.. I suppose what I would do would be to just think smelling smelling while simultaneously focusing on the smell.. But that's not what this is suggesting..

Hope this isn't too vague..

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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby Virgo » Thu Mar 11, 2010 9:40 pm



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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby jcsuperstar » Thu Mar 11, 2010 9:46 pm

there is the object, and there is contact with the sense door, this is smelling, when you label it as the smell of rice or smoke etc that is thinking and you have moved away from "just smelling"
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat

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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby JKPenumbra » Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:10 am


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bodom
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby bodom » Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:16 am

To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html
http://www.ajahnchah.org/

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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby jcsuperstar » Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:24 am

สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat

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bodom
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby bodom » Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:32 am

Heres his site. Highly recommended.

http://yuttadhammo.sirimangalo.org/

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html
http://www.ajahnchah.org/

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JKPenumbra
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby JKPenumbra » Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:40 am


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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby retrofuturist » Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:53 am

Greetings,

The closest thing to a mantra that I'm aware of in Theravada Buddhism is the use of the word "buddho".

Using Buddho to gain jhana
viewtopic.php?f=17&t=3727

It seems more popular in the Thai Forest tradition than elsewhere.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

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cooran
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby cooran » Fri Mar 12, 2010 8:25 am

Hello all,

Mantra is often used in Theravada practice. My favourite for Walking Meditation is:

Buddho ... Araham ... Bhagava
Bhagava ... Araham ... Buddho

Buddho ... Araham ... Bhagava
Bhagava ... Araham ... Buddho

The keeping of the term Araham in the centre is a mindfulness support. If you suddenly notice that you have Araham at the beginning or end of the line, you are alerted to the fact that mindfulness has slipped.

If this happens ~ "begin again".

This Manta is an echo of parts of the Recollection of the Three Treasures which was chanted everywhere at the Four Holy Places and other buddhist sites by all Theravada groups on my recent pilgrimage in India:

Iti pi so bhagava araham samma-sambuddho vijja-carana-sampanno sugato lokavidu anuttaro purisa-dhamma-sarathi sattha-deva-manussanam buddho bhagava'ti
Svakkhato bhagavata dhammo sanditthiko akaliko ehipassiko opanayiko paccattam veditabbo vinnuhi'ti

Supatipanno bhagavato savakasangho, ujupatipanno bhagavato savakasangho, ñayapatipanno bhagavato savakasangho, samicipatipanno bhagavato savakasangho yadidam cattari purisayugani attha purisapuggala, esa bhagavato savakasangho, ahuneyyo pahuneyyo dakkhineyyo añjalikaraniyo, anuttaram puññakkhettam lokassa'ti.

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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cooran
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby cooran » Sat Mar 13, 2010 12:28 am

Hello all,


Sabbe sattā sukhi hontu is a Pali phrase meaning “May all beings be well (or happy)”.
It’s not, properly speaking, a mantra, but is a chant that is used in exactly the same way as a mantra.
Unlike most mantras, it has a definite grammatical meaning.
Sabbe = all
Sattā (or sattaa) = beings
Sukhi = happy, well
Hontu = may they be

The chant has an attractive tune, and it’s lovely to chant this at the end of a period of the metta bhavana (development of lovingkindness) practice. It makes a beautiful group chant as well.
Outside of formal meditation, you can chant this mantra while walking, driving, or while engaged in any other such activity. It can help if you keep your attention centered on your heart, and also if you imagine that light is flowing from your heart and touching other people.

There are many other Pali chants that are similar and that are also closely related to the practice of lovingkindness, yet none seem to be as common as sabbe satta sukhi hontu, which really expresses the essence of lovingkindness.

Variants include:
sabbe satta avera hontu (may all beings be free from enmity and danger)
sabbe satta abyapajjha hontu (may all beings be free from mental suffering)
sabbe satta anigha hontu (may all beings be free from physical suffering)
sabbe satta dukkha muccantu (may all beings be free from suffering)
sabbe satta sukhi attanam pariharantu (may all beings protect themselves joyfully)

Click on link below to locate the chant in RealAudio
Or to listen to an MP3 version

Pronunciation notes:
a is pronounced as u in cut
ā (or aa) is pronounced as a in father
Sabbe satta sukhi hontu is the key of the development of lovingkindness and compassion. Although most religions teach us to love our neighbors and even our enemies, it’s often hard to know exactly how to do that. Buddhism, being a very practical tradition, offers a number of practices, including the development of lovingkindness (metta bhavana), and the development of compassion (karuna bhavana) meditations. Each of these practices helps us to develop a healthier and more loving relationship to oneself and others.

Metta is often translated as love as well as lovingkindness, and the essence of love in this sense is that we recognize that all beings, just like us, wish to experience happiness and do not wish to experience suffering. Metta is an empathetic sense of caring for others’ wellebing. It’s for that reason that sabbe satta sukhi hontu (“may all beings be happy”) is considered to express the heart of the lovingkindness practice.

In cultivating lovingkindness we commonly repeat phrases such as “May all beings be well; May all beings be happy; May all beings be free from suffering.” The accumulated effect of those words, when they are mindfully repeated, is to create a genuine sense of caring.
http://www.wildmind.org/mantras/figures/sabbesatta

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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JKPenumbra
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby JKPenumbra » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:44 am


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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Mar 13, 2010 5:17 am


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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby retrofuturist » Sat Mar 13, 2010 5:32 am

"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby catmoon » Sat Mar 13, 2010 6:01 am


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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby Virgo » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:06 pm

Hi Jesse. Yes, asking is always good and is welcome.

kevin


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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby retrofuturist » Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:42 am

"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

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cooran
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby cooran » Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:26 pm

---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

PeterB
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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby PeterB » Wed Mar 31, 2010 11:01 am

That is the way that mantra practise is taught in the Vajrayana. ( see " Foundations Of Tibetan Mysticism " by Lama Anagarika Govinda.)
The teaching i.e. that the "seed sylable" ( bija-mantra ) contained in the mantram is not different from the object itself. So that the seed sylable "hrang" for example found in some sanskrit mantras in both the Vajrayana and in Vedanta denotes "fire", and is seen as not- different from fire. It expresses the essence of fire.

Clearly the Theravada has no such teachings concerning " objective" language.
I think therefore it behoves us to be careful when using terms like " mantra" in an informal way.
Strictly speaking " Buddho" is not a mantram . It is a skillful means to aid concentration.
Last edited by PeterB on Wed Mar 31, 2010 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Use of Mantra

Postby PeterB » Wed Mar 31, 2010 11:25 am



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