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A psychophysiological phenomenon? - Dhamma Wheel

A psychophysiological phenomenon?

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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imagemarie
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A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby imagemarie » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:45 pm

I don't attach any great significance to this, but do find it a little interesting, and would like to hear what other's think, or have experienced?
I have lately noticed an increased tendency to become very cold during meditation practice, regardless of the ambient temperature wherever I sit.
Also, an occasional shiver (of the type described as "someone walking on your grave") arises when my concentration is quite deep.
I have a friend who seems to generate lots of heat when she sits - which she puts down to "positive energy" arising. We both have slightly below average blood pressures. I went through a phase of energetic sitting, where my body jumped around a little, but this seems to have passed :tongue:

Do you get hot under the collar, feel a post meditation chill, or have never been subject to either change?

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retrofuturist
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:50 pm

Greetings,

I find meditation cooling to the body unless it's a hot day and you feel like you're sitting in sweat.

The lack of physical movement and the lack of exhausting mental activity seems to reduce the metabolism (hence, reducing the burn-rate of calories or internal fire element).

To me this seems consistent with the reduced requirement for food that occurs naturally when on a meditation retreat.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

meindzai
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby meindzai » Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:08 pm


PeterB
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby PeterB » Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:54 am

Mine varies. Sometimes cool is generated , sometimes heat. Both independant of ambient temperature.
I note it then return to ther object.

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imagemarie
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby imagemarie » Thu Mar 18, 2010 6:12 pm


Kenshou
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby Kenshou » Thu Mar 18, 2010 6:21 pm

I've noticed this, too. I always heat up quite a bit. Which is nice, because of the cold weather where I am. I sort of assumed it had something to do with improved circulation, or something like that.

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Goofaholix
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby Goofaholix » Thu Mar 18, 2010 6:28 pm

If you attend meditation retreats you'll notice a lot of people wrap themselves up in blankets so I think it's pretty normal to feel a bit cooler than if you were physically active, but like everything it depends.

I would think that if you are feeling hot when the climate isn't hot it's likely to be a sign of too much striving.

Freawaru
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby Freawaru » Thu Mar 18, 2010 7:59 pm


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imagemarie
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby imagemarie » Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:36 pm

I once attended a retreat where rapid breathing and so-called "one-way" breathing were explored as "sport". I think it was geared for folk aspiring to jhana mastery, and I was somewhat out of my depth. The effects were profound, but not a lot to do with Buddhism. I don't practice or meditate for "sport", and don't experiment with visualisations. But thanks for the suggestions.

Mukunda
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Re: A psychophysiological phenomenon?

Postby Mukunda » Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:22 pm

As one enters deeper stages of concentration, it is quite common for the body to "slow down", heart rate, respiration, blood pressure, even electrical activity in the brain to diminish. I've seen experienced, long term meditators go so deep that medical practitioners had a difficult time finding any kind of life signs, even using sensitive electronic instruments. If body functions drop like that, temperatures are bound to drop.


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