Commentary on Sabbasava Sutta

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Commentary on Sabbasava Sutta

Postby Sönam » Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:58 pm

As you may know the vehicle I'm following is not the same as the one most of you follow ... nevertheless it's about the same enlightenment.

I would be interested in understanding how the following part of the Sabbasava Sutta (translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu) is understood ... and more, how it fit into the theravadin's discipline.

"[7] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by developing? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, develops mindfulness as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. He develops analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening... persistence as a factor for Awakening... rapture as a factor for Awakening... serenity as a factor for Awakening... concentration as a factor for Awakening... equanimity as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to develop these qualities do not arise for him when he develops them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by developing."

it seems that all those good qualities, part of the discipline, have to be abandoned ... once, which of course speaks quite a lot for a Vajra practitioner and his understanding of a progressive Dharma/Dhamma path ...

Sönam
(nb : maybe it's the wrong place, in this case I apologize ... move it then to the right place !)
no hope ... no fear
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Re: Commentary on Sabbasava Sutta

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Mon Mar 29, 2010 4:09 pm

The fermentations (āsava) or defilements have to be abandoned, not the good qualities (factors of enlightenment), which have to be developed.

When wholesome mental qualities are well developed, the defilements have no opportunity to take hold of the mind and develop, just as when a forest has been well rained on for weeks, no forest fire has a chance to start, but if the forest is dry, even a small fire soon takes hold and burns the entire forest.
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Re: Commentary on Sabbasava Sutta

Postby Tex » Wed Apr 07, 2010 3:01 am

Thanks for the analogy, bhante. I like that a lot.

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"The serene and peaceful mind is the true epitome of human achievement."-- Ajahn Chah, Living Dhamma

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