Pali word of the day

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Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Mar 26, 2010 10:09 pm

This thread is for displaying a new Pali word each day, similar to the Pali word association game except that the words do not necessarily need to be associated with the previous word of the day.

I'll start with some easy words from:
http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/paliwordday.pdf

and then later move on to words that are not so well-known.

Adhitthāna

* 1. 'Foundation': four 'foundations or basics' of an Arahat's mentality, mentioned and explained in M. 140: the foundation of understanding paññā, of truthfulness sacca of generosity cāga and of peace upasama.

* 2. 'Determination', resolution, resolve in: adhitthāna-iddhi magical power of determination' see: iddhi, adhitthāna-pāramī perfection of resolution.'

(using the definition, translation from Maha Thera Nyanatiloka. Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines, Buddhist Publication Society, first edition 1952.
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Sat Mar 27, 2010 5:52 am

Vācā

Speech.

Speech is the most powerful tool in creating goodness and evil for
oneself, for others or both. It also has the power to destroy happi-
ness and sorrow for oneself, for others or both.

We often forget that the first consideration in the act of speak-
ing is always the choice to remain silent. And if we were to
choose the option to speak we should ensure that the words spo-
ken benefit both oneself and others.

We must understand the natural characteristics our speech.
Once our words reach the ears of the listener – which are the
doors to his heart – they cannot be taken back. Speech also
reflects the credibility of the speaker – we are measured by the
way and manner in which we speak.

Speech that should be avoided is:
Falsehood (musàvàdà), slandering (to divide others), frivo-
lous speech (gossip) and harsh (unskillful) speech.
The qualities of Right Speech are:
Truth (sacca – what we see, hear, understand or cognize),
beneficial (constructive, motivating, etc.) and pleasant or
polite (the listener can appreciate it). The purpose of speak-
ing is to bring out the best in the listener and oneself.

(from A Pali word a day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Sun Mar 28, 2010 12:59 am

Abhaya

Fearless.

Abhaya Dàna – Giving of non-fear, trust, warmness, tolerance. In
the consideration of the Gifts, when one gives space and
allowance for others to move and time to think, or does not belit-
tle their capabilities or show up their weaknesses, one is consid-
ered as giving non-fear.
In Anguttara Nikàya, the book of the three, verse 172, the
Buddha said that one should give in such a way that the donee
does not feel humiliated, belittled or hurt. One should give with
due consideration and respect, and make the donee feel warmly
welcomed and glad to return.
Personal involvement in the act of giving – such as giving with
our own bare hands and promoting the rapport through our car-
ing, willingness and concerned attitude towards the donee – will
most definitely enhance the quality of our abhaya-dàna.
This will be even more so if we give things that are good,
choice, useful and appropriate, and not things which are only fit
to be thrown away.

(from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Mar 29, 2010 12:47 am

Tipitaka

Tipitaka (Tripitaka in Sanskrit) is the name given to the Buddhist sacred scriptures and is made up of two words; ti meaning ‘three’ and pitaka meaning ‘basket.’ The word basket was given to these writings because they were orally transmitted for some centuries, the way a basket of earth at a construction site might be relayed from the head of one worker to another. The three parts of the Tipitaka are the Sutta Pitaka, the Vinaya Pitaka and the Abhidhamma Pitaka.
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Tue Mar 30, 2010 12:53 am

anattà

consists of two words an (no) and atta (soul or eternal self)

no-self, not-self, no soul, ego-less

(from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby PeterB » Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:21 am

What a good idea.
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby BlackBird » Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:25 am

Thanks David

Great thread :)

metta
Jack
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." - MN. 70 Kitagiri Sutta
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Tue Mar 30, 2010 1:21 pm

Thanks PeterB and Jack!

I am doing this for myself as much as it is for others to learn too. If we just listed a link to a Pali-English website or dictionary or made a long list of Pali to English words, few of us would get anything out of it. But by doing just one Pali word or term(s) per day, it is easier to digest and remember. For the next few days the words will be easy like the above, but then we'll gradually get to the more difficult ones.
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Wed Mar 31, 2010 12:42 am

SILA
    ...moral precepts, code of morality.
        Buddhist ethics

    It consists of Right Speech (sammà vàcà), Right Action (sammà
    kammanta) and Right Livelihood (sammà ajivà).
       We can divide Sãla into two categories.
    1. The Avoidance
         Speech: lying, slandering, frivolous talk, harsh speech.
         Action: killing, stealing, excessive sensual indulgence (ad-
                     ultery, gambling, drugs and liquor).
         Livelihood: work that harms, deprive or takes others’ lives
                     (butchering, fishing, hunting, slavery); entails the
                     use of falsehood (deceit, trickery, usury); is
                     acquired through sexual indulgence (prostitution,
                     pornography); involves intoxication (liquor, drugs,
                     poisons); trading in arms and deadly weapons.
    2. The Performance
         Speech: truthful (sacca), beneficial, pleasant and polite,
                     and timely.
         Action: compassion (karuõà), loving kindness (mettà)
                     and wisdom (pa¤¤à).
         Livelihood: earnings that are lawfully gained, not generating
                     sorrow for oneself and others; energetic – doing
                     with our own hands and applying effort.

(from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Thu Apr 01, 2010 12:46 am

ANICCA

  ...impermanence; transience

  It is from the fact of impermanence that the other two character-
  istics; dukkha (suffering) and anattà (non-self), are derived.
     Whatever arises and passes away is anicca. Whatever is anicca
  is suffering, and whatever is suffering is of non-self.
     Anicca is the natural law of the universe. Everything – be it liv-
  ing or non-living, mind or matter – is subjected to change.
     In the law of Kamma (cause and effect), everything is the cre-
  ation of its preceding causes and is in turn a cause of the after-
  effects. Therefore, what is in existence is an ever-changing flux.
     It is not anicca that causes suffering but the clinging to, and
  craving for, that which is permanent and everlasting.
     The last words of the Buddha were...
               “All component things are subject to change,
                         strive on with diligence.”


            (from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Apr 02, 2010 12:50 am

SASANA

  ...the Dispensation of the Teachings
      of the Buddha

  Buddha-sàsana – the duration, beginning from the time of His
  first Sermon (Dhamma-cakka-pavathana Sutta) delivered to the
  first five disciples in the Deer Park at Isipatana, to the decline and
  disappearance of His teachings.
     By the end of His sàsana, five disappearances will occur in the
  following sequence:
  1. The attainment of Arahantship after 1,000 years.
  2. The practices, such as meditation (bhàvanà) and observing
        the five precepts. Monks will reduce their precept observance
        to four.
  3. The learning of the Buddha-dhamma. There will be no
        patronage from the devotees and the monks will stop teach-
        ing the Buddha-dhamma. The whole Buddha-dhamma will
        disappear and leave only the last four lines in a stanza.
  4. Symbols such as the monks’ robes. Monks will only wear yel-
        low tags to represent themselves as the community of monks.
  5. Relics (sàrãrika). All the Buddha relics will reassemble in the
        image of the Buddha, and will finally disappear to mark the
        end of the Buddha-sasana.

                                   (from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:23 pm

BUDDHA

  ...the Enlightened One, the Perfect One,
     the Holy One, the Omniscient

  In order to attain Buddhahood, one must perfect oneself in the
  ten Pàramãs (prerequisites for Enlightenment).
     Nibbàna can be attained through one of the following three
  Yànas (vehicles):
  1. Samma-Sam-Buddha (Fully Enlightened One)
     One who aspires to become a Buddha must first make a firm
     resolution (Bodhisatta Vow) in the presence of a Buddha.
     Once he is proclaimed to be a Buddha in the future, he will
     have to practice the 10 pàramãs with self-sacrificing spirit to
     serve the suffering humanity.
  2. Pacceka Buddha
     He who attains enlightenment without any spiritual assistance.
     He does not possess the faculty to enlighten others.
  3. Savaka Buddha (Arahant)
     He who has completely eradicated all the defilement, includ-
     ing the 10 fetters, with guidance from the Buddha’s teachings.
     He is capable of rendering spiritual assistance to others for
     their liberation.
                              (from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:38 pm

DHAMMA

Noun

1. The Buddha’s teachings.
2. Truth
3. Wisdom
4. A natural condition
5. Mental quality.
Adjective

1. Dhammic - acting in accordance with the Buddha’s teachings, the Dhamma.
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:40 pm

Since the above two are too easy, one more post for today:

CAKKA

  ...a wheel

  The Dhamma Cakka Pavatthana Sutta (The discourse to set in
  motion the Wheel of Dhamma) teaches us the Four Noble Truths.
  It forms the basis on which the system of Buddhist philosophy
  was founded.
  1. The Noble Truth of Suffering (Dukkha).
  2. The Noble Truth of the Cause (Samudaya) of Suffering –
        that is, Craving (Taõhà).
  3. The Noble Truth of the Cessation (Nirodha) of Suffering –
        the attainment of Non-rebirth (Nibbàna).
  4. The Noble Truth of the Path Leading to the Cessation of Suf-
        fering – Ariya Aññhagika Magga (the Noble Eight-fold Path).
  The first Truth is to be comprehend while the second one is to be
  eradicated. The third one is to be realized and the fourth one is
  to be developed.
     The Noble Eightfold Path, also known as the Middle Way,
  (Majjhima Pañipadà) is the method of avoiding the two ex-
  tremes: Self-mortification that weakens one’s intellect and self-
  indulgence that retards one’s moral progress.
     It consists of the eight Right Factors folded together for one to
  proceed in his journey of Truth and Liberation.
                                 
(from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)

Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta: Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

Dhamma + Cakka = Dhamma Wheel
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby Virgo » Sat Apr 03, 2010 1:34 am

Good idea David.

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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Sun Apr 04, 2010 12:20 am

SARANA
.
...refuge, protection, shelter, house

Ti-saraõa: the Threefold (Triple) Refuges (the Buddha, the Dhamma and
the Sangha.)

Every faithful lay Buddhist takes refuge in the Buddha, Dham-
ma and Sangha as their daily guide and inspiration.
We take refuge in the Buddha, the Teacher, who fully compre-
hended the Path to deliverance. As an incomparable guide and
Teacher, he showed us the Way to Liberation
We take refuge in the Dhamma, His Teachings, or the ultimate
Truth and the only Way to end suffering that leads us from dark-
ness to spiritual light.
We take refuge in the Sangha, the community of the disciples
of the Buddha, who have realized or are striving to realize the
Law of Deliverance. Their noble example inspires and guides us
on the Path of Liberation.
There are no hard rules or rites and rituals required for one to
take refuge in the Ti-saraõa. One is considered a true Buddhist
only if he observes and follows the teachings of the Buddha.

(from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:56 pm

DANA

  ...giving, generosity, charity, liberality, the
      virtue of alms-giving to the poor and needy;
      also, making gifts to a bhikkhu or to the
      community of bhikkhus

  It is the first step towards eliminating the defilement of greed,
  hatred and delusion, for every act of giving is an act of loving
  kindness (mettà) and compassion (karuõà).
     Dàna should be performed with the purpose of removing greed
  with sammà-diññhi (right understanding.)
     The three considerations of a giver are:
  1. to feel happy with his wholesome deed before, during and
       after the danà.
  2. to have saddhà (faith or confidence) in the Law of Kamma –
       Dana performed with right understanding will bear good
       results that are accompanied by pa¤¤à (wisdom).
  3. making resolution (Adhiññhàna) to attain Nibbàna – Although
       one may make worldly aspirations, such as good health,
       wealth and happiness, they must be made with the intention
       to support one’s spiritual growth. Good health will enable
       one to practice meditation; wealth will enable one to con-
       tinue doing danà and be born in the happy realm (loka)
       where Dhamma exists.
                                (from A Pali Word a Day, BuddhaNet pdf)
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:31 am

I hope it's OK to point out the relationship between dāna and the phrase "taking what is not given" (adinnādāna) in the second precept.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... #precepts5
Adinnādānā veramaṇī sikkhā-padaṃ samādiyāmi.
I undertake the training rule to refrain from stealing.

http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philol ... 1:569.pali
Adinna (pp.) [a + dinna] that which is not given, freq. in phrase adinn' ādāna (BSk. adattādāna Divy 302) seizing or grasping that which is not given to one, i. e. stealing.

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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:33 am

Virgo wrote:Good idea David.

Kevin


:thanks: Kevin.
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Re: Pali word of the day

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:35 am

mikenz66 wrote:I hope it's OK to point out the relationship between dāna and the phrase "taking what is not given" (adinnādāna) in the second precept.


:thumbsup:

Yes, definitely. Anyone can post here, Pali words not already posted (about one per day GMT, but no hard-fast rule there) and general comments about the Pali words posted here too.

Thanks for pointing that out with the second precept.
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