Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Apr 10, 2010 5:55 am

Goofaholix wrote:
bodom wrote:
Goofaholix wrote:I would say Hinayana practice with a Mahayana spirit is also the best way to approach practice in Theravada.


Just curious but what would be your definition of Mahayana spirit? And what is hinayana practice? If Theravada is not hinayana why would Theravadans practice a hinayana type practice? What is hinayana practice anyway if hinayana schools are no longer existent or practiced anymore?

:anjali:


I think you missed my point, Hinayana is not a school it's a style or approach to practice, Theravadin students would do it for the same reason Zen students do.

In the way Suzuki Roshi uses it Hinayana practice is concerned with disciplined detailed practice, step by step adherence to a method or discipline. Anyone who has been on a Theravadin Vipassana retreat or a Zen Sesshin will know just what I'm talking about.

Mahayana spirit (or mind) is to see the big picture, big mind, to be open, to free the mind to see things from a whole different viewpoint.

This is a balanced approach to practice. Don't get hung up in this school vs that school or this doctrine vs that doctrine. If you only have method and discipline without any capacity to free your mind then you'll hit a dead end, if you have a big mind but no discipline you'll get lost.

I understand what you are saying, but on the other hand, it could also easily be seen as just confusing terminology that we might not really need.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby Goofaholix » Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:48 am

tiltbillings wrote:I understand what you are saying, but on the other hand, it could also easily be seen as just confusing terminology that we might not really need.


Actually I think the endless Hinyana vs Mahayana threads is what we might not really need. Suzuki Roshi is is a pretty highly regarded teacher, I think he knows what he's doing
"Proper effort is not the effort to make something particular happen. It is the effort to be aware and awake each moment." - Ajahn Chah
"When we see beyond self, we no longer cling to happiness. When we stop clinging, we can begin to be happy." - Ajahn Chah
"Know and watch your heart. It’s pure but emotions come to colour it." — Ajahn Chah
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:54 am

Goofaholix wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:I understand what you are saying, but on the other hand, it could also easily be seen as just confusing terminology that we might not really need.


Actually I think the endless Hinyana vs Mahayana threads is what we might not really need. Suzuki Roshi is is a pretty highly regarded teacher, I think he knows what he's doing
The problem is that the Mahayana stuck us with this unfortunate terminology that is confusing and divisive. I suspect there are a fair few that have taken the notion of hinayana and all its negative baggage seriously when applied to the Theravada, cutting themselves off from the Theravada because it is hinayana, lesser in scope and goal. It is worth the effort to respond to that.

As for Suzuki Roshi, that he uses hinayana in a particular context, which may be okay with that context, but it does not mean we need to use those confusing words in a way that just adds more confusion as to what they mean.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby Mawkish1983 » Sat Apr 10, 2010 7:02 am

Goofaholix wrote:I think the endless Hinayana vs Mahayana threads is what we might not really need

Agreed. The search function here (and on other forums) is very powerful but underused. As and when these threads keep popping up (as they invariably will) I think it'd be better for there to just be a link to an identical thread that doubtlessly exists posted and for the thread to be closed. Why keep so many identical threads open? I don't get it.
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Apr 10, 2010 7:10 am

Mawkish1983 wrote:
Goofaholix wrote:I think the endless Hinayana vs Mahayana threads is what we might not really need

Agreed. The search function here (and on other forums) is very powerful but underused. As and when these threads keep popping up (as they invariably will) I think it'd be better for there to just be a link to an identical thread that doubtlessly exists posted and for the thread to be closed. Why keep so many identical threads open? I don't get it.

If you would collect a list of the threads on this subject, that would help greatly. Those than can be merged, would then be merged, lessening the number threads, and having such a list, we could then direct people wondering about this issue to the appropriate thread rather than starting a new one and lessening the crankiness level of those here who get cranky about such threads. All in all it would be a noble thing for you to understake..
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby Mawkish1983 » Sat Apr 10, 2010 7:25 am

tiltbillings wrote:All in all it would be a noble thing for you to understake..

'twould be much more practical for me to attempt to compile that list whilst sitting at my computer (in general I use my mobile phone for internet browsing, mainly because my PC is in a rather cold study which takes some time to warm up). I'll have much more time on Monday (my day off), so I'll have a go then. Don't get me wrong, I'm not 'cranky' about it, afterall I could just not bother viewing threads such as these :) I just don't see the point of so much repetition.

Anyway, thanks Tilt for the suggestion, I'll have a go on Monday :)
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Apr 10, 2010 7:31 am

Mawkish1983 wrote:
Anyway, thanks Tilt for the suggestion, I'll have a go on Monday :)
No hurry and seriously, it would be appreciated.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby Goofaholix » Sat Apr 10, 2010 8:45 am

tiltbillings wrote:The problem is that the Mahayana stuck us with this unfortunate terminology that is confusing and divisive. I suspect there are a fair few that have taken the notion of hinayana and all its negative baggage seriously when applied to the Theravada, cutting themselves off from the Theravada because it is hinayana, lesser in scope and goal. It is worth the effort to respond to that.

As for Suzuki Roshi, that he uses hinayana in a particular context, which may be okay with that context, but it does not mean we need to use those confusing words in a way that just adds more confusion as to what they mean.


True enough, but I think the fact that a well known Mahayana teacher calls his own style of practice "Hinayana" is evidence that they aren't all out to stick it to us and maybe the phrase wasn't just a polemic invented to beat non Mahayanists over the head with.

At the end of the day the usual touted polemic has nothing at all to do with Theravada anyway, however Suzuki Roshis meaning is useful no matter what path you're following.
"Proper effort is not the effort to make something particular happen. It is the effort to be aware and awake each moment." - Ajahn Chah
"When we see beyond self, we no longer cling to happiness. When we stop clinging, we can begin to be happy." - Ajahn Chah
"Know and watch your heart. It’s pure but emotions come to colour it." — Ajahn Chah
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:12 am

Goofaholix wrote:
True enough, but I think the fact that a well known Mahayana teacher calls his own style of practice "Hinayana" is evidence that they aren't all out to stick it to us and maybe the phrase wasn't just a polemic invented to beat non Mahayanists over the head with.
Tibetan teachers use the term hinayana in this way quite frequently; however, even that usage is not really appropriate to the Theravada.

. . . however Suzuki Roshis meaning is useful no matter what path you're following.
It is better, it would seem, just to leave these terms aside.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby PeterB » Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:16 am

Hear hear.
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby Sucitto » Tue Apr 13, 2010 6:23 am

Namo Buddhaya all, but actually, I made the post for knowing more about the topic. And now, I've known more about it. :buddha1:
Anumodana & thank you to who had replied my post.
:anjali:
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Sep 14, 2011 11:16 am

Greetings Tilt,

tiltbillings wrote:I suspect there are a fair few that have taken the notion of hinayana and all its negative baggage seriously when applied to the Theravada, cutting themselves off from the Theravada because it is hinayana, lesser in scope and goal. It is worth the effort to respond to that.

Indeed.

:buddha1:

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby Dan74 » Wed Sep 14, 2011 12:06 pm

Now you're just going to confuse everyone with that avatar, Retro! :rules:

And maybe you should change your nic to Retrobillings or Tiltofuturist, just to make sure.
_/|\_
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Re: Differences Hinayana & Theravada Buddhism

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Sep 14, 2011 12:31 pm

Greetings Dan,

:clap:

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
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