All-night session

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Guy
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All-night session

Postby Guy » Sat May 01, 2010 10:45 am

Tonight I'm going to try one of those all-night meditation session thingo's. I will alternate between sitting and walking until dawn. Anyone else tried it? What was your experience? Did you learn anything or did you find it to be a waste of time?
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

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Re: All-night session

Postby retrofuturist » Sat May 01, 2010 10:47 am

Greetings Guy,

Never tried it, but let us know how you go!

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)

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Ben
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Re: All-night session

Postby Ben » Sat May 01, 2010 12:19 pm

All the best Guy!
Looking forward to your report on your experience.
kind regards

Ben
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
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e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com

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Dan74
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Re: All-night session

Postby Dan74 » Sat May 01, 2010 12:50 pm

No, but wishing you lots of strength and perseverance!!!
_/|\_

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Re: All-night session

Postby tiltbillings » Sat May 01, 2010 1:33 pm

Don't be shy about using bright lighting to help you stay awake, and don't be shy about doing more walking than sitting, and don't be shy about doing standing rather sitting meditaion to help you stay awake.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

dheamhan a fhios agam

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson

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Re: All-night session

Postby Dan74 » Sat May 01, 2010 1:41 pm

To add to the above...

Some people like to bend forwards at the waist as far as they can in meditation to combat drowsiness (probably helps the blood to go to the head).

Also fresh air may help... Some have sat in the cold but it can be a bit extreme.

And standing meditation is an excellent suggestion!
_/|\_

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Re: All-night session

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Sat May 01, 2010 3:05 pm

Sadhu! Sadhu! Sadhu! I admire your determination and effort. Even if nothing immediately perceptible comes out of it it will not have been in vain. Please let us know how it goes! Metta. :anjali:
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Re: All-night session

Postby David N. Snyder » Sat May 01, 2010 4:40 pm

The Buddha did it, with very good results (to say the least).

I like it. I don't do it as much as I'd like, but find it very helpful. I have done it a few times. One episode many years ago is briefly mentioned at:

http://www.jhanas.com/

scroll down to 'Unique Experiences'

It can be sort of a 'mini-retreat' and break-throughs sometimes can occur at retreats or in this type of setting.

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Re: All-night session

Postby Guy » Sat May 01, 2010 6:33 pm

Thanks all for your encouragement and suggestions. Started to get very tired at about 1:30AM (normally I go to bed quite early) but I seem to have my second wind now, it's about 2:30AM. I haven't been just walking and sitting as I hoped. I have broken it up a little bit with a couple of dhamma talks. Also I didn't pick the best night to do this because my mum just bought a puppy today and it has been whining and since everyone was asleep I decided to keep it company for a little while. Oh well, I guess it is just an opportunity to cultivate some metta. Anyway...I'll report back in 4 hours.
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

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Re: All-night session

Postby PeterB » Sat May 01, 2010 7:14 pm

The only times I have done it were under rather different conditions Guy...i.e. in a shrine room. After around 1am I had it to myself until about 4.30am.

Walking a little certainly helps. As does a little quiet chanting.
Keep hydrated...

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Re: All-night session

Postby mikenz66 » Sat May 01, 2010 9:06 pm

Hi Guy,

Great idea!

I did a few nights like that last year at our Wat, at the urging of a visiting Thai Ajahn. I think I did two nights one weekend and one night some other weekend. The interesting thing was that it induces the experiences that I've had before of being quite mindful, but other parts of the mind not working too well (which sometimes happens when I get up on a normal retreat).

I think it had some good effects, especially in making it clear that that a retreat doesn't have to have "perfect conditions".

To me it seems a little odd to go on "retreat" and continue to post on the internet, but perhaps I'm oldfashioned.

Keep up the good work! :anjali:

Metta
Mike

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Guy
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Re: All-night session

Postby Guy » Sat May 01, 2010 10:49 pm

Sun's up, fun's over.

tiltbillings wrote:Don't be shy about using bright lighting to help you stay awake, and don't be shy about doing more walking than sitting, and don't be shy about doing standing rather sitting meditaion to help you stay awake.


About 4:00AM onwards the sitting was not so good, much nodding, almost fell off my stool a couple of times. I didn't do any standing meditation, but I did a fair bit of walking. Had a bright light on all night.

Dan74 wrote:Some people like to bend forwards at the waist as far as they can in meditation to combat drowsiness (probably helps the blood to go to the head).


I did this quite a bit throughout the night. I found it quite helpful, thanks!

Dan74 wrote:Also fresh air may help... Some have sat in the cold but it can be a bit extreme.


I wasn't brave enough to try this, its almost winter where I live...maybe next time.

PeterB wrote:Walking a little certainly helps. As does a little quiet chanting.


Indeed, I chanted the Metta Sutta which gave me some energy.

mikenz66 wrote:I think I did two nights one weekend and one night some other weekend.


Two nights in a row?! Too ascetic for me!

mikenz66 wrote:To me it seems a little odd to go on "retreat" and continue to post on the internet, but perhaps I'm oldfashioned.


I wouldn't categorize it as a retreat, more like an experiment for the effects of sleep deprivation on meditation. I had to look after the puppy which took perhaps a couple of hours in total, sweet little thing, but rather needy. I would like to try this experiment again though within the context of a month long self-retreat, free of all those distractions.

A few things which I learned from the experience:

1) Even though I was hungry and tired I was quite happy and content thanks to my inner resources. This helps strengthen my faith in myself and in the Dhamma that I do not need to rely so much on physical needs being met to be happy. Obviously I am going to have a good meal and a nice rest now, but it is good to see that it doesn't matter so much if I go a few hours without. Actually I feel pretty good right now! (But of course that's impermanent)
2) Thinking too much increases the tiredness very rapidly. The less thoughts that came into my mind, the less I felt the need for sleep.
3) The urge to lie down and sleep came in waves. Before I began I thought that it might just get stronger and stronger, but it seemed like there is a definite build up of tiredness to a certain point, but if I stay mindful then energy starts to build up in the place of the tiredness.

Thanks all once again for your input and support.
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

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Re: All-night session

Postby retrofuturist » Sat May 01, 2010 10:54 pm

Greetings Guy,

Guy wrote:1) Even though I was hungry and tired I was quite happy and content thanks to my inner resources. This helps strengthen my faith in myself and in the Dhamma that I do not need to rely so much on physical needs being met to be happy. Obviously I am going to have a good meal and a nice rest now, but it is good to see that it doesn't matter so much if I go a few hours without. Actually I feel pretty good right now! (But of course that's impermanent)
2) Thinking too much increases the tiredness very rapidly. The less thoughts that came into my mind, the less I felt the need for sleep.
3) The urge to lie down and sleep came in waves. Before I began I thought that it might just get stronger and stronger, but it seemed like there is a definite build up of tiredness to a certain point, but if I stay mindful then energy starts to build up in the place of the tiredness.


Good stuff - well done.

:thumbsup:

Thanks for the report. It's the kind of thing I would like to try one night if the world would accommodate me... however, whatever day of the week, I'll have to get up at 7am either to go to work, or get bossed into making my son breakfast or playing Marble Works!

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)

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Ben
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Re: All-night session

Postby Ben » Sat May 01, 2010 11:13 pm

Wel done, Guy!
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
Buddhist Life Stories of Australia
e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com

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Dan74
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Re: All-night session

Postby Dan74 » Sat May 01, 2010 11:42 pm

WoW, Guy! You did it!!! Well done!!!!!!!!!

You are an inspiration, Chess Buddy!

(BTW, :quote: winter :quote:? This is Perth, we are talking about?? :jumping:

_/|\_

Guy wrote:Sun's up, fun's over.

tiltbillings wrote:Don't be shy about using bright lighting to help you stay awake, and don't be shy about doing more walking than sitting, and don't be shy about doing standing rather sitting meditaion to help you stay awake.


About 4:00AM onwards the sitting was not so good, much nodding, almost fell off my stool a couple of times. I didn't do any standing meditation, but I did a fair bit of walking. Had a bright light on all night.

Dan74 wrote:Some people like to bend forwards at the waist as far as they can in meditation to combat drowsiness (probably helps the blood to go to the head).


I did this quite a bit throughout the night. I found it quite helpful, thanks!

Dan74 wrote:Also fresh air may help... Some have sat in the cold but it can be a bit extreme.


I wasn't brave enough to try this, its almost winter where I live...maybe next time.

PeterB wrote:Walking a little certainly helps. As does a little quiet chanting.


Indeed, I chanted the Metta Sutta which gave me some energy.

mikenz66 wrote:I think I did two nights one weekend and one night some other weekend.


Two nights in a row?! Too ascetic for me!

mikenz66 wrote:To me it seems a little odd to go on "retreat" and continue to post on the internet, but perhaps I'm oldfashioned.


I wouldn't categorize it as a retreat, more like an experiment for the effects of sleep deprivation on meditation. I had to look after the puppy which took perhaps a couple of hours in total, sweet little thing, but rather needy. I would like to try this experiment again though within the context of a month long self-retreat, free of all those distractions.

A few things which I learned from the experience:

1) Even though I was hungry and tired I was quite happy and content thanks to my inner resources. This helps strengthen my faith in myself and in the Dhamma that I do not need to rely so much on physical needs being met to be happy. Obviously I am going to have a good meal and a nice rest now, but it is good to see that it doesn't matter so much if I go a few hours without. Actually I feel pretty good right now! (But of course that's impermanent)
2) Thinking too much increases the tiredness very rapidly. The less thoughts that came into my mind, the less I felt the need for sleep.
3) The urge to lie down and sleep came in waves. Before I began I thought that it might just get stronger and stronger, but it seemed like there is a definite build up of tiredness to a certain point, but if I stay mindful then energy starts to build up in the place of the tiredness.

Thanks all once again for your input and support.
_/|\_

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Re: All-night session

Postby Tex » Sat May 01, 2010 11:46 pm

Thanks for sharing, Guy, and congrats!

You've inspired me to try an all-night meditation session myself when I have an open weekend.
"The serene and peaceful mind is the true epitome of human achievement."-- Ajahn Chah, Living Dhamma

"To reach beyond fear and danger we must sharpen and widen our vision. We have to pierce through the deceptions that lull us into a comfortable complacency, to take a straight look down into the depths of our existence, without turning away uneasily or running after distractions." -- Bhikkhu Bodhi


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