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Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys? - Page 2 - Dhamma Wheel

Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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BubbaBuddhist
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby BubbaBuddhist » Sun May 02, 2010 7:02 pm

You know, i take great joy in my practice, it has literally saved my life. I have horror stories in my life, going back to my earliest childhood, and so consequently I have horror stories constantly threatening to play over and over in my head. There is a voice always trying to break in trying to convince me "This world is an awful place." I'll admit, in my weaker moments, I agree with that voice. But most of the time, my practice brings me great joy and keeps the shadows at bay. If it weren't for my practice, there is no doubt in my mind you would be receiving this message via Ouija board.

I was surprised sometimes at the seriousness and sometimes the harshness of the tone here. I left for a while until things cooled down a little because I attributed it to the settling-in period of a new board and energies ran hot while people felt each other out. As it turned out, that was exactly what it was as much of the harshness has abated, but the seriousness is still there. Now and then I'll post something funny and it turns into a serious moral dialectic--which strikes me as funnier than the original topic. So perhaps there is a subtle humor underlying the seriousness after all.

Of course, the quest for sambhodhi is a serous undertaking and not to be taken lightly. Maybe this is why so many of us come across so seriously online. Onscreen personalities may not reflect the totality of out makeup. I can assure you there's much more to me than what appears in pixel dots. Some of it quite unsettling.

My 2.5 cents.

The lingering stench of J
Author of Redneck Buddhism: or Will You Reincarnate as Your Own Cousin?

Reductor
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Reductor » Sun May 02, 2010 7:44 pm


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tiltbillings
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby tiltbillings » Sun May 02, 2010 8:46 pm

Path of Discrimination, Patisambhidadamagga p. 372, para XXI 17 in Nanamoli's translation. This abbreviated translation is by Kåre A. Lie"


Those who are filled with smiles and laughter, will perfect the virtues. That is smiling wisdom. Those who are filled with smiles and laughter will also attain perfect concentration and wisdom. Those who are filled with smiles and laughter will attain the path and the direct knowledges, and they will quickly realize the ultimate meaning, nibbana.

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bodom
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby bodom » Sun May 02, 2010 9:18 pm

To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html
http://www.ajahnchah.org/

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mikenz66
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby mikenz66 » Sun May 02, 2010 9:27 pm


nathan
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby nathan » Sun May 02, 2010 9:32 pm

Probably you can find criticism of anything and everything if you look around on the internet for a little while.
But whoever walking, standing, sitting, or lying down overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening. § 110. {Iti 4.11; Iti 115}

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adosa
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby adosa » Sun May 02, 2010 10:00 pm

Last edited by adosa on Mon May 03, 2010 1:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
"To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas" - Dhammapada 183

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David N. Snyder
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby David N. Snyder » Sun May 02, 2010 11:45 pm

Image




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christopher:::
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby christopher::: » Mon May 03, 2010 1:36 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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christopher:::
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby christopher::: » Mon May 03, 2010 1:48 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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Guy
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Guy » Mon May 03, 2010 2:27 am

Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

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Kim OHara
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Kim OHara » Mon May 03, 2010 8:17 am

Hi, Guy,
I'm not sure if David was thinking of 'the masses' as the majority of Westerners who come to Buddhism or as the majority of people in traditionally Buddhist countries.
If the former, your experience is pretty typical and David is right but perhaps for the wrong reasons. As you accidentally demonstrate, Tibetan Buddhism has such a high profile (relatively speaking, of course) that one can easily not realise there is any other kind, partly because the Chinese-forced Tibetan diaspora did at least bring large numbers of Buddhist teachers into the wider world (not that that is any reason to condone the invasion).
If David meant the latter, he is still right but over a far longer timescale: whole populations gradually shifted Buddhism towards a more 'religious', devotional style and away from the more 'philosophical' style of classical Theravada. Even in Theravadin countries, the typical lay approach is, if I can put it this way without offending anyone, more faith-based than experience-based or analytically-based.

:namaste:
Kim

Edited for clarity.

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Guy
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Guy » Mon May 03, 2010 8:44 am

Hi Kim,

I don't think it is offensive at all to call someone a faith-based practitioner. Maybe us westerners who have been trained to be very skeptical of religion have a jaded perception of words like "faith" but personally I have no problem with the idea. Even though I am a westerner I would say that of the five spiritual faculties my strongest is probably Saddha.

With Metta,

Guy
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

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Annapurna
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Annapurna » Mon May 03, 2010 12:04 pm

http://www.schmuckzauberei.blogspot.com/

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Dan74
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Dan74 » Mon May 03, 2010 1:12 pm

I guess another comment that comes to mind from a former Theravada practitioner at ZFI (kojip) is that Theravadins strive for cessation, while Mahayanists for liberation of all beings. So a Mahayanist makes a vow to come back over and over again, while a Theravadin wants to escape this reality (as a human being) once and for all (and while doing so may indeed save a fair few beings!). So it's like people fleeing a sinking ship. One makes an effort to help everyone along the way, but once ashore, does not return and the other one keeps coming back.

Not sure if this is an accurate description and which sounds more dour and grumpy, but it does paint the two traditions in different light in this regard.

_/|\_
_/|\_

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bodom
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby bodom » Mon May 03, 2010 2:23 pm

To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html
http://www.ajahnchah.org/

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Dan74
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Dan74 » Mon May 03, 2010 2:29 pm

My understanding was that in Theravada there was no distinction between arahat and Buddha in terms of enlightenment, but the alleged difference I was pointing out is the vow to come back rather than pass into parinibbana (cessation), in order to be of use to others. Mahayana people tend to take this quite seriously, Ven Huifeng (Pannasikhara) can hopefully correct me if I am misrepresenting here.

(Hope Mitra Conf went well, Venerable!)
_/|\_

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bodom
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby bodom » Mon May 03, 2010 2:34 pm

Is Theravada Buddhism for Arahatship Only? by Ven. U Silananda
http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha064.htm

Arahants, Buddhas, and Bodhisattvas Bhikkhu Bodhi
http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha335.htm

Bodhisattva Ideal in BuddhismVen. Dr. W. Rahula
http://www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha126.htm

THE BODHISATTVA IDEAL IN THERAVAADA
http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/JR-PHIL/jeffrey2.htm

The path of the Bodhisattva in Theravada Buddhism
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=3363&start=0

:anjali:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html
http://www.ajahnchah.org/

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Dan74
Posts: 3012
Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 11:12 pm

Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby Dan74 » Mon May 03, 2010 2:39 pm

WOW! Thanks for that, Bodom!!! :anjali:

I will give it a good read tomorrow. Now it's time for bed.

_/|\_
_/|\_

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bodom
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Re: Are we a bunch of sour, grim killjoys?

Postby bodom » Mon May 03, 2010 2:44 pm

To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html
http://www.ajahnchah.org/


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