Buddha Nature ?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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christopher:::
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Re: Buddha Nature ?

Postby christopher::: » Mon May 03, 2010 1:36 pm

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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Dan74
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Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 11:12 pm

Re: Buddha Nature ?

Postby Dan74 » Mon May 03, 2010 2:03 pm

I am not sure if you are speaking from your knowledge of Eastern culture, Chris, but it doesn't really make sense to me that it would alleviate grief. I'd grieve even more knowing that that potential was there but was never truly developed (as it is in most cases).

There is a Mahayana teaching that everyone is moving towards enlightenment at the pace they are capable of. This might help. But I may be misunderstanding.

To me, the teachings on Buddha Nature are an encouragement that it is possible to attain enlightenment (because I already have it, as it were), to seek nowhere else and to let go of what is false and unwholesome, rather than accrue more. It is also a pointer not to set up false dualities and learn to see the perfect aspect of everything including myself.

The concept of Buddha nature is often used interchangeably with Nibbana (Nirvana) which is hardly ever mentioned in Zen. Mind you Buddha nature is not mentioned all that often since not even a dog has it... :shrug:

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christopher:::
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Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 12:56 am

Re: Buddha Nature ?

Postby christopher::: » Mon May 03, 2010 2:14 pm

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009


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