Simile of the Raft

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Simile of the Raft

Postby clw_uk » Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:49 pm

In the simile of the raft the buddha states

In the same way, monks, I have taught the Dhamma compared to a raft, for the purpose of crossing over, not for the purpose of holding onto. Understanding the Dhamma as taught compared to a raft, you should let go even of Dhammas, to say nothing of non-Dhammas."



What aspects of the Dhamma get grasped at?

What aspects of the Dhamma do/should we finally let go of at the end?
“Happy is the man who has broken the chains which hurt the mind, and has given up worrying once and for all.” Ovid
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Re: Simile of the Raft

Postby Fede » Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:52 pm

Every aspect is grasped at, in some way or another, to begin with.
Every aspect is let go of, in all ways, to end with.

(simply because you let go, it doesn't mean you've "let go". It just means you've - 'let go'. ;) )

:namaste:
"Samsara: The human condition's heartbreaking inability to sustain contentment." Elizabeth Gilbert, 'Eat, Pray, Love'.

Simplify: 17 into 1 WILL go: Mindfulness!

Quieta movere magna merces videbatur. (Sallust, c.86-c.35 BC)
Translation: Just to stir things up seemed a good reward in itself. ;)

I am sooooo happy - How on earth could I be otherwise?! :D


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Re: Simile of the Raft

Postby mountain » Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:02 am

Friend clw,
Not this,not that.
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Re: Simile of the Raft

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:34 am

Greetings Craig,

The word "Dhamma" in this phrase can also be translated as little d "dhamma", signifying phenomenon. However, the way it is worded in this translation (whose translation is it?) has been rendered in such a way that it precludes the (little d) "dhamma" interpretation.

I believe this is referring to non-becoming, particularly applied during meditation practice. We should let go of fine-states of becoming, to say nothing of the coarser states.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Simile of the Raft

Postby appicchato » Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:27 pm

retrofuturist wrote:The word "Dhamma" in this phrase can also be translated as little d "dhamma"


Dhamma, and dhamma are two kettles of fish, which many don't (or don't know to) consider...worth investigating...

Be well... :smile:
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Re: Simile of the Raft

Postby genkaku » Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:10 pm

What aspects of the Dhamma get grasped at?


Maybe Dhamma, for one ... dhamma for another?

Or non-dhamma, if you like.
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Re: Simile of the Raft

Postby clw_uk » Thu Feb 12, 2009 6:08 pm

Thank you all

:namaste:
“Happy is the man who has broken the chains which hurt the mind, and has given up worrying once and for all.” Ovid
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