Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

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Paul Davy
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Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

Postby Paul Davy » Tue Jan 06, 2009 5:15 am

Greetings,

For your online reading pleasure...

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)
http://www.online-literature.com/hesse/siddhartha/

Metta,
Retro. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"Whether I were to preach in brief, Sāriputta, or whether I were to preach in detail, Sāriputta, or whether I were to preach both in brief or in detail, Sāriputta, rare are those who understand." (A I 333, Sāriputtasutta)

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Ben
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Re: Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

Postby Ben » Tue Jan 06, 2009 5:21 am

What synchronicity!
I packed my copy in abox a little while ago!
To be honest, I preferred Narciss and Goldmund, and The Glass Bead Game.
Thanks for the link Retro!

Ben
“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

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Annapurna
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Re: Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

Postby Annapurna » Tue Jan 06, 2009 3:38 pm

Finally somebody who read Narciss and Goldmund!

Siddharta was great, too.
http://www.schmuckzauberei.blogspot.com/

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christopher:::
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Re: Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

Postby christopher::: » Wed Jan 07, 2009 2:16 am

I read all three, in the 1980s, on a Herman Hesse binge, lol. Indeed N&G is great! Found the Glass Bead Game a bit boring if I recall correctly. Loved also Steppenwolf, Damein and Journey to the East. Most definitely Siddhartha had a big impact though.

Was taking a 20th Century literature course in my last year of college (1983), we had to read Kafka, Sartre, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and others. The Hesse book the professor chose was Siddhartha, and the wisdom just jumped out at me. The way reality was presented by Hesse made so much more sense (in my mind) then how the other authors presented the world.
Last edited by christopher::: on Wed Jan 07, 2009 3:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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Re: Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

Postby Dhammanando » Wed Jan 07, 2009 2:34 am

retrofuturist wrote:For your online reading pleasure...

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)


Pleasurable, perhaps. But a dhammic story?
* * * * * * * * * * * *

First hermit: Still there’s one thing about being a hermit, at least you get to meet people.

Second hermit: Oh yes! I wouldn’t go back to public relations.
— Monty Python, The Hermits


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Paul Davy
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Re: Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

Postby Paul Davy » Wed Jan 07, 2009 3:06 am

Greetings venerable,

Well... I agree it's a loose connection. ;)

The time I went to read it, I got about two chapters through and I decided my time would be better spent reading suttas.

Nonetheless, people find the Dhamma in different ways.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"Whether I were to preach in brief, Sāriputta, or whether I were to preach in detail, Sāriputta, or whether I were to preach both in brief or in detail, Sāriputta, rare are those who understand." (A I 333, Sāriputtasutta)

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christopher:::
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Re: Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (1922)

Postby christopher::: » Wed Jan 07, 2009 3:26 am

Hello Venerable,

Not sure how much of the Dhamma is taught in the story, but it does provide a good model of aspects of the journey we all need to take. The growing sense of dissatisfaction with how things are in our world, a sense that one can find answers by leaving the past behind and searching for a better way. I think for people born into Buddhist culture the story might not resonate, but for those of us who were born into Western culture and then set out to find something very different there are parallels, perhaps?

I think something like the American TV series "Kung Fu" provided a similar catalyst for many people. Looking at the series now we might observe that there is more Taoist and pop wisdom presented in that show then dhamma. But still it provided a model for many people of a very different way of thinking and behaving in the world. If these kinds of cultural creations get people searching, that can be helpful.

In my opinion.
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009


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