MN 1 variations in texts

Textual analysis and comparative discussion on early Buddhist sects and texts.
nathan
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MN 1 variations in texts

Postby nathan » Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:15 am

I have been studying and researching the Mulapariyaya Sutta (MN 1) and was recently informed about variations in different versions. Apparently in the PTS version the sutta concludes with the Bhikkhus pleased, as does the German translation by K.E.Neumann. It was also mentioned that the Siamese version has a variant reading, although it was not specified what kind of variation.

I understand that there are also Chinese and Tibetan versions of this sutta.

My questions are about variations in the texst of this sutta, what those variations specifically are, how far back these variations can be traced, any variations in the oldest known texts and which of the older texts have been used in the preparation of different translations, past and present, into other languages.

Any information that anyone can offer would be greatly appreciated.
:anjali:
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But whoever walking, standing, sitting, or lying down overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening. § 110. {Iti 4.11; Iti 115}

Paññāsikhara
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby Paññāsikhara » Wed Sep 01, 2010 7:33 am

In the PTS edition of this sutta, it has:

Idamavoca bhagavā.4 Na te bhikkhū bhagavato bhāsitaṃ abhinandunti.5

4. Na attamanā te bhikkhū syā. Attamanā te bhikkhū [PTS]
5. Nābhinandunti katthaci

---

And the Chatthasangayana digital edition has:

Idamavoca bhagavā. Na te bhikkhū [na attamanā tebhikkhū (syā.), te bhikkhū (pī. ka.)] bhagavato bhāsitaṃ abhinandunti.

"attamanā" means "mentally enraptured", or "delighted", or whatever term you may wish to use. "na" is a negation.
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nathan
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby nathan » Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:49 pm

But whoever walking, standing, sitting, or lying down overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening. § 110. {Iti 4.11; Iti 115}

Moggalana
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby Moggalana » Wed Sep 01, 2010 3:16 pm

Let it come. Let it be. Let it go.

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tiltbillings
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Sep 01, 2010 4:17 pm


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tiltbillings
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Sep 01, 2010 5:29 pm

Just to note that the Ven Bodhi translation ends with the monks note being pleased.

nathan
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby nathan » Wed Sep 01, 2010 5:31 pm

But whoever walking, standing, sitting, or lying down overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening. § 110. {Iti 4.11; Iti 115}

nathan
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby nathan » Wed Sep 01, 2010 5:32 pm

But whoever walking, standing, sitting, or lying down overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening. § 110. {Iti 4.11; Iti 115}

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tiltbillings
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Sep 01, 2010 5:34 pm


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fig tree
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby fig tree » Thu Sep 09, 2010 7:23 am

I seem to remember in Ven. Bodhi's talk about MN 1 that he remarked something to the effect that it would have been a relatively easy mistake to make, to have turned it from "pleased" to "not pleased". I don't want to download it again right now, but it's toward the end of the talk.

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lojong1
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby lojong1 » Thu Sep 09, 2010 8:50 am

Whether or not the monks really delighted in the Buddha's discourse, the Pali verb is the same as 'delighting' elsewhere in the same sutta.
Buddha had just taught them:
that the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person delights (abhinandati) in earth and[...]nibbaana (because he has not comprehended it);
the trainee should not delight in earth, etc., (so that he may comprehend it);
the arahant does not delight (because he has comprehended);
and the Tathagata does not delight (he has 'comprehended it to the end').

The monks should have at least tried not to delight (abhinandati) at the buddha's words. If they were successful in non-delighting, this would mean the lesson was well received.

Bikkhu Bodhi (or Nanamoli?) notes in MN: "The Bhikkhus did not delight in the Buddha's words, apparently because the discourse probed too deeply into the tender regions of their own conceit, and perhaps their residual Brahmanic views. At a later time, MA tells us, when their pride had been humbled..."

It seems he (and MA) thought that delight would have been a good sign after such a teaching!

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beeblebrox
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby beeblebrox » Thu Sep 09, 2010 2:32 pm


lojong1
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby lojong1 » Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:42 pm


Sylvester
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Re: MN 1 variations in texts

Postby Sylvester » Mon Oct 11, 2010 9:03 am

I gather from Piya Tan's essay on this sutta that the Chinese version in the Ekottara Agama, EA 44.6 also portrays the monks as "not accepting" the teaching.


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