Monks and Family

Theravāda in the 21st century - modern applications of ancient wisdom
User avatar
clw_uk
Posts: 3938
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:36 am
Location: Wales, United Kingdom

Monks and Family

Postby clw_uk » Mon Feb 23, 2009 5:28 pm

I have been thinking about ordaining (in the Forest Tradition) but one thing that holds me back is a thought that i might not see my family again ( i always thought this is what happens), is this what happens or is one allowed to visit family (or visa versa) i have heard some stories of monks going home to visit their families


Any info would be great, thanks in advance


:anjali:
Lost to a world in which I crave no part,
I sit alone and listen to my heart,
Pleased with my little corner of the earth,
Glad that I came--not sorry to depart
Richard Le Gallienne

User avatar
Cittasanto
Posts: 5969
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:31 pm
Location: Ellan Vannin
Contact:

Re: Monks and Family

Postby Cittasanto » Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:25 pm

I have heard stories straight from the monks mouth about his parents and brother visiting him at the monestary, and him going to visit his family, and a story from a former monk who knows a monk (who is quite famous) who visited his parents at christmas
so I think that it is ok but I do think there is a length of time where you can't 2 years I have heard but that may of been Vajrayana and not specifically theravada.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

User avatar
clw_uk
Posts: 3938
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:36 am
Location: Wales, United Kingdom

Re: Monks and Family

Postby clw_uk » Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:05 pm

Thanks for that Manapa

Ive heard some stories like this as well, i imagine there is some sort of "probation" period so to speak, i wonder if the Vinaya has any rules about it
Lost to a world in which I crave no part,
I sit alone and listen to my heart,
Pleased with my little corner of the earth,
Glad that I came--not sorry to depart
Richard Le Gallienne

User avatar
retrofuturist
Posts: 15236
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: Monks and Family

Postby retrofuturist » Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:10 pm

Greetings Craig,

This is a good topic. I hope you don't mind if I move it from the Lounge to one of our Theravada forums.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"We should not congratulate someone on the success of their misdeeds, but on the contrary should endeavour to advise him or her to lead a more skilful and wholesome life. If such advice is ignored then we can only give up and let go" - Phra Panyapatipo

User avatar
clw_uk
Posts: 3938
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:36 am
Location: Wales, United Kingdom

Re: Monks and Family

Postby clw_uk » Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:52 pm

No not at all


:anjali:
Lost to a world in which I crave no part,
I sit alone and listen to my heart,
Pleased with my little corner of the earth,
Glad that I came--not sorry to depart
Richard Le Gallienne

User avatar
Dhammanando
Posts: 2165
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:44 pm
Location: Wat Doi Phra Koed, Chom Thong, Chiang Mai

Re: Monks and Family

Postby Dhammanando » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:01 pm

Hi Craig,

clw_uk wrote:I have been thinking about ordaining (in the Forest Tradition) but one thing that holds me back is a thought that i might not see my family again ( i always thought this is what happens), is this what happens


No, we're not the Moonies. :smile:

or is one allowed to visit family (or visa versa) i have heard some stories of monks going home to visit their families


Yes, though since this is a matter that is not covered in the Vinaya, in practice the frequency and length of visits will vary according to the in-house rules of a particular community or the views of a particular abbot.

Best wishes,
Dhammanando Bhikkhu
    ...and this thought arose in the mind of the Blessed One:
    “Who lives without reverence lives miserably.”
    Uruvela Sutta, A.ii.20

    It were endless to dispute upon everything that is disputable.
    — William Penn Some Fruits of Solitude,

User avatar
clw_uk
Posts: 3938
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 2:36 am
Location: Wales, United Kingdom

Re: Monks and Family

Postby clw_uk » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:05 pm

Bhante Dhammanando

Thanks for clearing that up for me :smile:


:anjali:
Lost to a world in which I crave no part,
I sit alone and listen to my heart,
Pleased with my little corner of the earth,
Glad that I came--not sorry to depart
Richard Le Gallienne


Return to “Theravāda for the modern world”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine