How to guard the sense doors?

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Kamran
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How to guard the sense doors?

Post by Kamran »

Anyone know of practical training for guarding the sense doors as described in below passage. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

"'Here a monk, on seeing a visible object with the eye, does not grasp at its major signs or secondary characteristics. Because greed and sorrow, evil unskilled states, would overwhelm him if he dwelt leaving this eye-faculty unguarded, so he practices guarding it, he protects the eye faculty, develops restraints of the eye-faculty. . .In this way, a monk is a guardian of the sense-doors.'"
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Goofaholix
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by Goofaholix »

Kamran wrote:Anyone know of practical training for guarding the sense doors as described in below passage. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

"'Here a monk, on seeing a visible object with the eye, does not grasp at its major signs or secondary characteristics. Because greed and sorrow, evil unskilled states, would overwhelm him if he dwelt leaving this eye-faculty unguarded, so he practices guarding it, he protects the eye faculty, develops restraints of the eye-faculty. . .In this way, a monk is a guardian of the sense-doors.'"
Any mindfulness or vipassana based meditation technique is designed to do this.
“Peace is within oneself to be found in the same place as agitation and suffering. It is not found in a forest or on a hilltop, nor is it given by a teacher. Where you experience suffering, you can also find freedom from suffering. Trying to run away from suffering is actually to run toward it.” ― Ajahn Chah
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retrofuturist
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by retrofuturist »

Greetings Kamran,

From the Satipatthana Sutta (MN 10)
"Furthermore, the monk remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the sixfold internal & external sense media. And how does he remain focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the sixfold internal & external sense media? There is the case where he discerns the eye, he discerns forms, he discerns the fetter that arises dependent on both. He discerns how there is the arising of an unarisen fetter. And he discerns how there is the abandoning of a fetter once it has arisen. And he discerns how there is no future arising of a fetter that has been abandoned. (The same formula is repeated for the remaining sense media: ear, nose, tongue, body, & intellect.)

"In this way he remains focused internally on the mental qualities in & of themselves, or focused externally... not appropriating anything in the world. This is how a monk remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the sixfold internal & external sense media.
Metta,
Retro. :)
"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"It is natural that one who knows and sees things as they really are is disenchanted and dispassionate." (AN 10.2)

"Overcome the liar by truth." (Dhp 223)
PTa
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by PTa »

nn
Last edited by PTa on Fri May 04, 2012 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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alan
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by alan »

Make a list of all the things that habitually annoy you, and then practice ignoring them.
And turn off the TV.
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Kamran
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by Kamran »

thanks.
"Silence gives answers"

Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi
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bodom
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by bodom »

Kamran wrote:Anyone know of practical training for guarding the sense doors as described in below passage. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

"'Here a monk, on seeing a visible object with the eye, does not grasp at its major signs or secondary characteristics. Because greed and sorrow, evil unskilled states, would overwhelm him if he dwelt leaving this eye-faculty unguarded, so he practices guarding it, he protects the eye faculty, develops restraints of the eye-faculty. . .In this way, a monk is a guardian of the sense-doors.'"
Hi Kamran

Easy example:

A woman. When seeing a beautiful woman you notice her hair, eyes, lips, chest, butt etc. These are the signs and features which if dwelled upon will lead to lust, etc. or in my case a smack from my wife! :tongue:

:anjali:
This is our foundation: to have sati, recollection, and sampajañña, self-awareness, whether standing, walking, sitting, or reclining. Whatever arises, just leave it be, don’t cling to it. Whether it’s like or dislike, happiness or suffering, doubt or certainty... Don’t try to label everything, just know it. See that all the things that arise in the mind are simply sensations. They are transient. They arise, exist and cease. That’s all there is to them, they have no self or being, they are neither ‘us’ nor ‘them’. None of them are worthy of clinging to.

- Ajahn Chah
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manas
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by manas »

Kamran wrote:Anyone know of practical training for guarding the sense doors as described in below passage. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

"'Here a monk, on seeing a visible object with the eye, does not grasp at its major signs or secondary characteristics. Because greed and sorrow, evil unskilled states, would overwhelm him if he dwelt leaving this eye-faculty unguarded, so he practices guarding it, he protects the eye faculty, develops restraints of the eye-faculty. . .In this way, a monk is a guardian of the sense-doors.'"
One thought I can offer is that, while (if I'm being a good boy) I try to not look around while out and about at any fair female forms, that it's good to not take this to extremes. Sometimes we do have to look at people. If I'm being served at a shop by an attractice woman I actually prepare my mind before I have to look at her eyes to say "thank you". I of course try to recall what I know about the true nature of the body, rather than letting the old habit of latching onto what seems appealing have it's way; but sometimes I also focus on compassion, thinking of how difficult it must be to have physical beauty, be attached to it, and then slowly lose it, finally ending up old and wrinkled.

May we all, men and women alike, become dis-enchanted with forms

_/I\_

:heart:
To the Buddha-refuge i go; to the Dhamma-refuge i go; to the Sangha-refuge i go.
murphythecat8
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by murphythecat8 »

ayya khema teach the labelling.
when you see a men, women, ect, you dont grasp at any feature, you simply label men, women, friends, ect and go back to mindfulness of the body. when you see a piece of chocolate, you see only color and form. its when the mind start saying: oh chocolate, thats good, I want some" that problems arise. if you label it, it stops the thoughts and you can replace with mindfulness of body.
Last edited by murphythecat8 on Thu Sep 29, 2016 6:49 am, edited 2 times in total.
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bodom
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Re: How to guard the sense doors?

Post by bodom »

From Thanissaro Bhikkhu:
RESTRAINT OF THE SENSES

The senses here are six: your senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch, along with
the sense of ideation—your mind’s knowledge of ideas. Restraint of these senses doesn’t
mean going around with blinders on your eyes or plugs in your ears. It actually forces you
to see more than you normally might, for it requires you to become sensitive to two things:
(1) your motivation for, say, looking at a particular sight; and (2) what’s happening to your
mind as a result of looking at that sight. In this way you bring the questions of discernment
to bear in an area where you’re usually driven by the questions of hunger: the search to see
or hear delicious things. You learn to view your engagement with the senses as part of a
causal process. This is how restraint helps to develop discernment. At the same time, you
learn to counteract causal currents that would disturb the mind. This helps to develop
concentration.

To resist getting swept away by these currents, you have to maintain your center of
awareness within the body. That type of center is like an anchor for securing the mind.
Then make sure that your center is comfortable. That keeps the mind well fed, so that it
doesn’t abandon its anchor to flow along with those currents in search of food. When the
mind isn’t hungry for pleasure, it’ll be much more willing to exercise restraint over the
currents going out the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, and mind. Once the mind is firmly
centered, you’re in a good position to step out of the currents and view them in terms of
both aspects of their causal patterns.

1. Each time you direct your attention to the senses, try to be clear about your
motivation. Realize that you’re not a passive receiver of sights, sounds, etc. The mind
actually goes out looking for sensory stimuli. And often it’s looking for trouble. There are
times, for instance, when there’s nothing in your surroundings to inspire lust, but lust arises
in the mind and goes looking for something to nourish itself. The same thing happens with
anger and all your other emotions.

So when you look at things, what are you looking for? Who’s doing the looking? Is lust
doing the looking? Is anger doing the looking? If you let these emotions direct your eyes, they get
used to ordering your mind around as well. You’re strengthening the very committee members that
you’ll later need to wrestle down during the meditation.

If you see that unskillful intentions are directing where you focus your attention or
how you look at something, change your focus. Look at something else, or look at the same
thing in a different way. If you’ve been contemplating a beautiful body, look for the
aspects that aren’t so beautiful—and they aren’t far away, just under the skin. The same
principle holds for anger. If you’re thinking about someone you really hate, remember that
there’s another side to that person as well, a good side. Be a person with two eyes, and not
just one. Or if you find that when you drop the lust or the anger, you’re no longer
interested in looking at or thinking about those people, you realize that the problem wasn’t
with them. It was with the committee in your mind. You learn that you can’t really trust
some of its members. This is a good lesson to learn on a daily basis.

2. A similar principle applies when you take note of the results of your looking. If you
realize that the way you’ve been looking at something has started to aggravate unskillful
mental states, either look away or learn to look at the same thing in a way that counteracts
those mental states. The same applies to what you listen to, what you smell, what you
taste, what you touch, and especially what you think about.

If you can keep your attention focused on the way in which the mind initiates sensory
contact and is affected by sensory contact, you’re staying focused inside even as you look
or listen outside. This helps to keep the center of your focus firm and resilient throughout
the day.
http://www.dhammatalks.org/Archive/Writ ... 130123.pdf

:anjali:
This is our foundation: to have sati, recollection, and sampajañña, self-awareness, whether standing, walking, sitting, or reclining. Whatever arises, just leave it be, don’t cling to it. Whether it’s like or dislike, happiness or suffering, doubt or certainty... Don’t try to label everything, just know it. See that all the things that arise in the mind are simply sensations. They are transient. They arise, exist and cease. That’s all there is to them, they have no self or being, they are neither ‘us’ nor ‘them’. None of them are worthy of clinging to.

- Ajahn Chah
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