Nibbana defined by Bikkhu Bodhi

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paul
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Nibbana defined by Bikkhu Bodhi

Post by paul »

Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi
Buddhist scholar-monk, Chuang Yen Monastery, Carmel

Nirvana is the supreme goal of the Buddhist path. Different Buddhist traditions describe nirvana in different ways. In the Early Buddhism tradition that I follow, nirvana is considered from two angles. From one angle, it is the destruction of greed, hatred and delusion — the root defilements that drive the cycle of repeated birth and death. As long as these defilements remain in the mind, a person will repeatedly undergo the suffering of birth, old age and death. When the defilements are uprooted, the state that follows is called the nirvana element with residue, the residue being the psychophysical complex acquired through past karma. This is nirvana experienced during life, a state of perfect beatitude — blissful, peaceful, secure from all bondage. When the liberated one passes away, the cycle of rebirth utterly ends. This is called the nirvana element without residue, also called the deathless and the unconditioned. This state transcends all the finite, limited categories of human thought.

The Buddha said that one who has attained the unconditioned nirvana is indescribable, because none of our words and concepts adequately apply to one who has passed from the cycle of repeated birth into that state that transcends birth and death.
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cappuccino
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Re: Nibbana defined by Bikkhu Bodhi

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“There is that sphere where there is no earth, no water, no fire nor wind; no sphere of infinity of space, of infinity of consciousness, of nothingness or even of neither-perception-nornon-perception; there, there is neither this world nor the other world, neither moon nor sun; this sphere I call neither a coming nor a going nor a staying still, neither a dying nor a reappearance; it has no basis, no evolution and no support: this, just this, is the end of dukkha.”
~ Ud 8.1
samsarictravelling
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Re: Nibbana defined by Bikkhu Bodhi

Post by samsarictravelling »

paul wrote: Fri Feb 08, 2019 5:00 am Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi
...
The Buddha said that one who has attained the unconditioned nirvana is indescribable, because none of our words and concepts adequately apply to one who has passed from the cycle of repeated birth into that state that transcends birth and death.
https://www.newsday.com/long-island/li- ... 1.26906665
I guess Nirvana can be thought of as Nibbana, because just using the Sanskrit word, instead.

samsarictravelling
Last edited by samsarictravelling on Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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cappuccino
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Re: Nibbana defined by Bikkhu Bodhi

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Nirvana is described

It is the Unformed, the Unconditioned, the End,
the Truth, the Other Shore, the Subtle,
the Everlasting, the Invisible, the Undiversified,
Peace, the Deathless, the Blest, Safety,
the Wonderful, the Marvellous,
Nibbæna, Purity, Freedom,
the Island,
the Refuge, the Beyond.
~ S 43.1-44
paul
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Re: Nibbana defined by Bikkhu Bodhi

Post by paul »

samsarictravelling wrote: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:51 pm
paul wrote: Fri Feb 08, 2019 5:00 am The Buddha said that one who has attained the unconditioned nirvana is indescribable, because none of our words and concepts adequately apply to one who has passed from the cycle of repeated birth into that state that transcends birth and death.
https://www.newsday.com/long-island/li- ... 1.26906665
Nibbana is not able to be explained in words, and that is one reason why it is not advisable or enlightened to question adepts about their attainments. Even though a beginner has not experienced the unconditioned, it is necessary to have a conceptual understanding of its characteristics, and to set it apart from conditioned experience, which is governed by cycles. in fact the recollection of nibbana is one of the forty subjects of meditation and a detailed description of its qualities is found in Visuddhimagga chap. VIII, 245.

Another characteristic of nibbana which is important to the practice is its opposition to samsara, which is differentiated and diffuse, the phenomenal world and worldliness in general, while nibbana is freedom from samsaric diffuseness.
Last edited by paul on Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
samsarictravelling
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Re: Nibbana defined by Bikkhu Bodhi

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paul wrote: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:00 pm
samsarictravelling wrote: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:51 pm
paul wrote: Fri Feb 08, 2019 5:00 am The Buddha said that one who has attained the unconditioned nirvana is indescribable, because none of our words and concepts adequately apply to one who has passed from the cycle of repeated birth into that state that transcends birth and death.
https://www.newsday.com/long-island/li- ... 1.26906665
Nibbana is not able to be explained in words, and that is one reason why it is not advisable or enlightened to question adepts about their attainments. Even though a beginner has not experienced the unconditioned, it is necessary to have a conceptual understanding of its characteristics, and to set it apart from conditioned experience, which is governed by cycles. in fact the recollection of nibbana is one of the forty subjects of meditation and a detailed description of its qualities is found in Visuddhimagga chap. VIII, 245.
Paul, thank you for your input.

samsarictravelling
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