Bahu-sacca or Baahu-sacca?

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shuka
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon May 10, 2021 2:40 pm

Bahu-sacca or Baahu-sacca?

Post by shuka »

The Mangala Sutta has the word bāhusacca. It means "much learning/well-informed/learnedness".
https://www.buddhistdoor.net/dictionary ... /bahusacca

bāhusacca : [nt.] great learning.
Bāhusacca (nt.) [fr. bahu+sacca, which latter corresponds to a Sk. śrautya fr. śru, thus b. is the abstract to bahussuta. See on expln of word Kern, Toev. s. v.] great learning, profound knowledge M i.445; A i.38 (so read for bahu˚); ii.218; Vin iii.10; Dh 271; Vv 639.
The corresponding Sanskrit word seems to be bahuśruta. In the dictionaries, a learned person is called a bahuśruta and bahu-śrutya means erudition.

But one of the meanings of bāhu in Sanskrit is the arm.
What is the difference between bahu and bāhu and is a person bahuśruta or bāhuśruta?
sphairos
Posts: 569
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 4:37 am

Re: Bahu-sacca or Baahu-sacca?

Post by sphairos »

shuka wrote: Mon May 10, 2021 3:13 pm The Mangala Sutta has the word bāhusacca. It means "much learning/well-informed/learnedness".
https://www.buddhistdoor.net/dictionary ... /bahusacca

bāhusacca : [nt.] great learning.
Bāhusacca (nt.) [fr. bahu+sacca, which latter corresponds to a Sk. śrautya fr. śru, thus b. is the abstract to bahussuta. See on expln of word Kern, Toev. s. v.] great learning, profound knowledge M i.445; A i.38 (so read for bahu˚); ii.218; Vin iii.10; Dh 271; Vv 639.
The corresponding Sanskrit word seems to be bahuśruta. In the dictionaries, a learned person is called a bahuśruta and bahu-śrutya means erudition.

But one of the meanings of bāhu in Sanskrit is the arm.
What is the difference between bahu and bāhu and is a person bahuśruta or bāhuśruta?
bāhusacca does not have anything to do with bāhu, "arm". It is bahu + sacca, and the first vowel is lengthened either as guṇa grade or just dialectal lengthening (it appears also as bahusacca).
and is a person bahuśruta or bāhuśruta?
bahuśruta is a normal state of this word.

bāhuśrautya is "great learning". Can be written also bāhuśrutya, bahuśrutya etc.

Has nothing to do with bāhu, arm.

Bahu means "much, many, large" etc.
How good and wonderful are your days,
How true are your ways?
shuka
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon May 10, 2021 2:40 pm

Re: Bahu-sacca or Baahu-sacca?

Post by shuka »

sphairos wrote: Fri May 14, 2021 12:28 pm
shuka wrote: Mon May 10, 2021 3:13 pm The Mangala Sutta has the word bāhusacca. It means "much learning/well-informed/learnedness".
https://www.buddhistdoor.net/dictionary ... /bahusacca

bāhusacca : [nt.] great learning.
Bāhusacca (nt.) [fr. bahu+sacca, which latter corresponds to a Sk. śrautya fr. śru, thus b. is the abstract to bahussuta. See on expln of word Kern, Toev. s. v.] great learning, profound knowledge M i.445; A i.38 (so read for bahu˚); ii.218; Vin iii.10; Dh 271; Vv 639.
The corresponding Sanskrit word seems to be bahuśruta. In the dictionaries, a learned person is called a bahuśruta and bahu-śrutya means erudition.

But one of the meanings of bāhu in Sanskrit is the arm.
What is the difference between bahu and bāhu and is a person bahuśruta or bāhuśruta?
bāhusacca does not have anything to do with bāhu, "arm". It is bahu + sacca, and the first vowel is lengthened either as guṇa grade or just dialectal lengthening (it appears also as bahusacca).
and is a person bahuśruta or bāhuśruta?
bahuśruta is a normal state of this word.

bāhuśrautya is "great learning". Can be written also bāhuśrutya, bahuśrutya etc.

Has nothing to do with bāhu, arm.

Bahu means "much, many, large" etc.
Thank you :twothumbsup:
shuka
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon May 10, 2021 2:40 pm

Re: Bahu-sacca or Baahu-sacca?

Post by shuka »

It is bahu + sacca, and the first vowel is lengthened either as guṇa grade or just dialectal lengthening (it appears also as bahusacca).
Can you tell what guṇa grade is? Does dialectal lengthening mean it is like a vernacular or colloquial form?
Last edited by shuka on Sat May 15, 2021 1:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
sphairos
Posts: 569
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 4:37 am

Re: Bahu-sacca or Baahu-sacca?

Post by sphairos »

shuka wrote: Sat May 15, 2021 1:26 pm
It is bahu + sacca, and the first vowel is lengthened either as guṇa grade or just dialectal lengthening (it appears also as bahusacca).
Can you tell what guṇa grade is? Does dialectal lengthening mean it is like a vernacular or colloquial form?
Here is the table of guṇa and vṛddhi grades of vowels in Sanskrit

https://www.bolochant.com/resources/wik ... on-10#10a2

In Sanskrit when you create a compound word with some adjectives their first vowel takes vṛddhi form (not guṇa).

MW Dictionary:
2bāhu बाहुPage 730 Column 3
(for 1. see col. 2), Vr̥iddhi form of bahu in comp. = kīṭa mfn. g. palady‐ādi.

Dialectal form is rather with the short a, bahusacca.
How good and wonderful are your days,
How true are your ways?
shuka
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon May 10, 2021 2:40 pm

Re: Bahu-sacca or Baahu-sacca?

Post by shuka »

sphairos wrote: Sat May 15, 2021 2:44 pm
shuka wrote: Sat May 15, 2021 1:26 pm
It is bahu + sacca, and the first vowel is lengthened either as guṇa grade or just dialectal lengthening (it appears also as bahusacca).
Can you tell what guṇa grade is? Does dialectal lengthening mean it is like a vernacular or colloquial form?
Here is the table of guṇa and vṛddhi grades of vowels in Sanskrit

https://www.bolochant.com/resources/wik ... on-10#10a2

In Sanskrit when you create a compound word with some adjectives their first vowel takes vṛddhi form (not guṇa).

MW Dictionary:
2bāhu बाहुPage 730 Column 3
(for 1. see col. 2), Vr̥iddhi form of bahu in comp. = kīṭa mfn. g. palady‐ādi.

Dialectal form is rather with the short a, bahusacca.
:goodpost: Thank you!
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