Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Textual analysis and comparative discussion on early Buddhist sects and texts.
sphairos
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Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by sphairos »

Mindfulness in Early Buddhism: Characteristics and Functions

https://www.amazon.com/Mindfulness-Earl ... 1911407554

With two favorable forewords from two brilliant early Buddhism scholars, Mark Allon and Rupert Gethin. I was surprized to learn that Mark Allon is also a mindfulness practitioner. I always thought he was just a scholar and philologist, distanced from the application of the teaching.

And the book

Superiority Conceit in Buddhist Traditions: A Historical Perspective

https://www.amazon.com/Superiority-Conc ... 1614297193

"Renowned scholar-monk writes accessibly on some of the most contentious topics in Buddhism—guaranteed to ruffle some feathers.

Armed with his rigorous examination of the canonical records, respected scholar-monk Bhikkhu Analayo explores—and sharply criticizes—four examples of what he terms “superiority conceit” in Buddhism:
the androcentric tendency to prevent women from occupying leadership roles, be these as fully ordained monastics or as advanced bodhisattvas
the Mahayana notion that those who don’t aspire to become bodhisattvas are inferior practitioners
the Theravada belief that theirs is the most original expression of the Buddha’s teaching
the Secular Buddhist claim to understand the teachings of the Buddha more accurately than traditionally practicing Buddhists

Ven. Analayo challenges the scriptural basis for these conceits and points out that adhering to such notions of superiority is not, after all, conducive to practice. “It is by diminishing ego, letting go of arrogance, and abandoning conceit that one becomes a better Buddhist,” he reminds us, “no matter what tradition one may follow.”

Thoroughly researched, Superiority Conceit in Buddhist Traditions provides an accessible approach to these conceits as academic subjects. Readers will find it not only challenges their own intellectual understandings but also improves their personal practice."

Buckle up, fellas... :smile:
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thomaslaw
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by thomaslaw »

sphairos wrote: Tue Jan 12, 2021 4:12 pm
Superiority Conceit in Buddhist Traditions: A Historical Perspective

https://www.amazon.com/Superiority-Conc ... 1614297193

"Renowned scholar-monk writes accessibly on some of the most contentious topics in Buddhism—guaranteed to ruffle some feathers.

Armed with his rigorous examination of the canonical records, respected scholar-monk Bhikkhu Analayo explores—and sharply criticizes—four examples of what he terms “superiority conceit” in Buddhism:
the androcentric tendency to prevent women from occupying leadership roles, be these as fully ordained monastics or as advanced bodhisattvas
the Mahayana notion that those who don’t aspire to become bodhisattvas are inferior practitioners
the Theravada belief that theirs is the most original expression of the Buddha’s teaching
the Secular Buddhist claim to understand the teachings of the Buddha more accurately than traditionally practicing Buddhists

Ven. Analayo challenges the scriptural basis for these conceits and points out that adhering to such notions of superiority is not, after all, conducive to practice. “It is by diminishing ego, letting go of arrogance, and abandoning conceit that one becomes a better Buddhist,” he reminds us, “no matter what tradition one may follow.”

Thoroughly researched, Superiority Conceit in Buddhist Traditions provides an accessible approach to these conceits as academic subjects. Readers will find it not only challenges their own intellectual understandings but also improves their personal practice."
Criticizing sharply others as "superiority conceit" in Buddhist traditions, it seems also suggesting that Bhikkhu Analayo himself, a Theravada monk fundamentalist, is the one urgently needs to overcome personal self-conceit/pride to improve his personal practice and to challenge his own intellectual understandings!
:buddha1:
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DooDoot
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by DooDoot »

Unlikely Anālayo could come to understand what sati is. It appears, per SN 14.14, Analayo is in fitting association with Mark Allon and Rupert Gethin and selling books via Amazon.
To what extent is mindfulness an originally Buddhist concept?
Buddhist mindfulness = Samma Sati
Is there a place for bare awareness and what are its results?
Samma Sati is not "bare awareness" because sammasati is always cojoined with sampajjana, which is situation wisdom rather than a totally unjudging mind.
What is the significance of mindfulness of the body and what are its benefits?
It is not possible to be mindful of the body because mindfulness means "recollection" of right view. Mindfulness can recollect or keep in mind the Right View towards the body but mindfulness cannot be mindful "of" the body because the body is a physical object and mindfulness can only recollect mental objects.
How does mindfulness relate to memory and to the practice of recollection?
Mindfulness is recollection although not the ordinary meaning of "memory". It means to not forget to apply the Dhamma in every moment.
What are the different benefits associated with mindfulness in the early discourses?
Strange question.
and How does mindfulness relate to other aspects of the early Buddhist path of practice?
MN 117, which Anālayo heretically attempted to debunk, clearly answers the above question. How ironic that the only sutta that precisely answers the above question Analayo attempted to revile, defile & repudiate.

:smile:
Last edited by DooDoot on Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:59 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by mikenz66 »

thomaslaw wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:34 am Criticizing sharply others as "superiority conceit" in Buddhist traditions, it seems also suggesting that Bhikkhu Analayo himself, a Theravada monk fundamentalist, is the one urgently needs to overcome personal self-conceit/pride to improve his personal practice and to challenge his own intellectual understandings!
:buddha1:
I'm not sure why you would label Bhikkhu Analayo a fundamentalist. I haven't noticed him making the sort of statements we sometimes see here that could possibly be labelled as fundamentalist (such as that the Theravada Commentaries are completely worthless). He does, of course, express opinions about whether certain ideas are early or late, but he usually seems careful to point out that something being later doesn't necessarily mean that it is worthless. Of course, some may think that some of his interpretations are mistaken (and they may even possibly be right), but that's a different issue.

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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by DooDoot »

mikenz66 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:57 am I'm not sure why you would label Bhikkhu Analayo a fundamentalist.
He attacked the self-declared Arahant of the www.dharmaoverground.org website. :D
mikenz66 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:57 amI haven't noticed him making the sort of statements we sometimes see here that could possibly be labelled as fundamentalist (such as that the Theravada Commentaries are completely worthless).
Subjective stuff, since declaring the Theravada Commentaries are not completely worthless could be deemed as fundamentalist.
mikenz66 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:57 amOf course, some may think that some of his interpretations are mistaken (and they may even possibly be right), but that's a different issue.
:bow:
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sphairos
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by sphairos »

thomaslaw wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:34 am Criticizing sharply others as "superiority conceit" in Buddhist traditions, it seems also suggesting that Bhikkhu Analayo himself, a Theravada monk fundamentalist, is the one urgently needs to overcome personal self-conceit/pride to improve his personal practice and to challenge his own intellectual understandings!
:buddha1:
Why do you think so? He is a very experienced practitioner and teacher of mindfulness/satipaṭṭhāna and a brilliant scholar, and his position regarding the authenticity of the scriptures is far from fundamentalist: he thinks of some commentarial explanations as of misled ones, and he thinks that some of the Chinese verions of the suttas are closer to the word of the Buddha than the Pāli ones... His attitude towards Mahāyāna traditions is also very moderate and quite tolerant one.
Last edited by sphairos on Thu Jan 14, 2021 2:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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sphairos
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by sphairos »

DooDoot wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:52 am Unlikely Anālayo could come to understand what sati is.
I think he understands and teaches it quite correctly. He wrote four painstakingly detailed monographs on the satipaṭṭhāna and mindfulness. I doubt you can point out and prove any mistakes in them...
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by frank k »

short critique of his definition of mindfulness here, with pictures.
https://notesonthedhamma.blogspot.com/2 ... rong.html

He may have improved his definition over his previous versions, trying to redress some of the criticisms from the past, but it's still fatally flawed.

It doesn't look anything like the Buddha's mindfulness definition (SN 47.2). What his current definition of sati is, is a clunky mess trying to redress his problematic old definition to not contradict the Buddha's SN 47.2 definition. The result is a definition of sati that is convoluted, hard to digest the meaning easily.

Really the best thing to do, is admit one has made a big mistake and just translate the Buddha's definition and stick with that. Revolutionary idea:
Maybe the Buddha knew what he was doing. Then later followers got style drift, started reading each other's definition of mc-mindfulness, and then lost sight of the Buddha's definition.
www.lucid24.org/sted : ☸Lucid24.org🐘 STED definitions
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by coffeendonuts »

sphairos wrote: Tue Jan 12, 2021 4:12 pmVen. Analayo challenges the scriptural basis for these conceits and points out that adhering to such notions of superiority is not, after all, conducive to practice. “It is by diminishing ego, letting go of arrogance, and abandoning conceit that one becomes a better Buddhist,” he reminds us, “no matter what tradition one may follow.”
Exactly.
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by DooDoot »

sphairos wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 1:42 pm I think he understands and teaches it quite correctly. He wrote four painstakingly detailed monographs on the satipaṭṭhāna and mindfulness. I doubt you can point out and prove any mistakes in them...
I have in the past. Mistakes:
He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in experiencing the whole body,’

I shall breathe in calming the bodily formation

The term satipaììhãna can be explained as a compound ofsati, “mindfulness” or “awareness

“being present” and “attending” to something with mindfulness

sati “stands by”, in the sense of being present; sati is “ready at hand”, in the sense of attending to the current situation. Satipaììhãna can then be translated as “presence of mindfulness” or as “attending with mindfulness”

The problem with the commentarial explanation is that, instead of understanding satipaììhãna as a particular attitude of being aware

Understanding sati in this way facilitates relating it to the context of satipaììhãna, where it is not concerned with recalling past events, but functions as awareness of the present moment

In the context of satipaììhãna meditation, it is due to the presence of sati that one is able to remember what is otherwise only too easily forgotten: the present moment.

Sati is required not only to fully take in the moment to be remembered, but also to bring this moment back to mind at a later time.

Sati as a mental quality is closely related to attention (manasikãra), a basic function which, according to the Abhidhammic analysis, is present in any kind of mental state. This basic faculty of ordinary attention characterizes the initial split seconds of bare cognizing of an object, before one begins to recognize, identify, and conceptualize. Sati can be understood as a further development and temporal extension of this type of attention, thereby adding clarity and depth to the usually much too short fraction of time occupied by bare attention in the perceptual process.

https://www.buddhismuskunde.uni-hamburg ... t-path.pdf
The Anapanasati stuff i recall is much worse.
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sphairos
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by sphairos »

DooDoot wrote: Fri Jan 15, 2021 5:39 am
sphairos wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 1:42 pm I think he understands and teaches it quite correctly. He wrote four painstakingly detailed monographs on the satipaṭṭhāna and mindfulness. I doubt you can point out and prove any mistakes in them...
I have in the past.
Maybe you think you have, but in reality you haven't by any means whatsoever....
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by DooDoot »

sphairos wrote: Fri Jan 15, 2021 5:05 pm Maybe you think you have, but in reality you haven't by any means whatsoever....
But I have, which is shown by your trite unsubstantiated answer. Analayo said what he wrote was also from his own practise. It shows he is not a stream-enterer, particularly his emphasis upon "awareness", "attention" and particularly the "present moment". The Buddha rarely, if ever, relates mindfulness to the "present moment". The goal of Dhamma practise is not about staying in the present moment because there is no such thing as "the present moment" since it is so fleeting. The present moment very quickly becomes the past. Analayo has not yet worked out the role of mindfulness & how to use it. This is possibly because of his Mara heresy in attempting to debunk MN 117.
Among the faculties (indriya) and powers (bala), sati occupies the middle position. Here sati has the function of balancing and monitoring the other faculties and powers, by becoming aware of excesses or deficiencies. A monitoring function similar to its position among the faculties and powers can be found in the noble eightfold path, where sati occupies the middle position in the three-factored path section directly concerned with mental training. The monitoring quality of sati is however not restricted to right effort and right concentration only, since according to the MahãcattãrîsakaSutta the presence of right mindfulness is also a requirement for the other path factors.

In regard to its two neighbours in the noble eightfold path, sati performs additional functions. In support of right effort sati performs a protective role by preventing the arising of unwholesome states of mind in the context of sense-restraint, which in fact constitutes an aspect of right effort. In relation to right concentration, well-established sati acts as an important foundation for the development of deeper levels of mental calm, a topic to which I will return later on

https://www.buddhismuskunde.uni-hamburg ... t-path.pdf
A close examination of the instructions in the Satipaììhãna Sutta reveals that the meditator is never instructed to interfere actively with what happens in the mind. If a mental hindrance arises, for example, the task of satipaììhãna contemplation is to know that the hindrance is present, to know what has led to its arising, and to know what will lead to its disappearance. A more active intervention is no longer the domain of satipaììhãna, but belongs rather to the
province of right effort (sammã vãyãma). :roll:
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sphairos
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by sphairos »

DooDoot wrote: Fri Jan 15, 2021 7:51 pm his Mara heresy in attempting to debunk MN 117.
Very funny, thanks! :clap: :clap: :clap:

You've made my day :D

P.S.

From this point on whenever I don't like something I m going to call it "a Mara heresy" :D :lol: :clap:
Last edited by sphairos on Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by DooDoot »

sphairos wrote: Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:21 pm Very funny, thanks! :clap: :clap: :clap:

You've made my day :D
Again, the above is off-topic. Lets move on closer to my objections, where Analayo is close but remains mistaken:
so too sati fulfils an important preparatory role for the arising of wisdom
0 The elephant’s neck, then, represents the quality of giving full attention to a matter at hand as a feature of sati.
The supportive role of sati in the development of wisdom comes up again in a verse from the Sutta Nipãta, where sati keeps the streams in this world in check, so that the faculty of wisdom can cut them off
This verse points in particular to the role of sati in relation to restraint at the sense doors (indriya saÿvara) as a basis for the development of wisdom.
According to these similes, sati is the mental quality that enables wisdom to arise
Compare the above to the following:
One is mindful to abandon wrong view & to enter & remain in right view: This is one's right mindfulness.

MN 117
Because when one has heard the Dhamma from such bhikkhus one dwells withdrawn by way of two kinds of withdrawal—withdrawal of body and withdrawal of mind.

Dwelling thus withdrawn, one recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over. Whenever, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwelling thus withdrawn recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over, on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness is aroused by the bhikkhu; on that occasion the bhikkhu develops the enlightenment factor of mindfulness; on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness comes to fulfilment by development in the bhikkhu.

SN 46.3
Analayo appears to say mindfulness is a cause for the arising of later/future wisdom rather than the role of mindfulness is to bring & keep in mind past learned wisdom.

His writings appear inaccurate generalisations blocking the seamless harmonization of path factors required for stream-entry.

His writings, while sophistication in their scholarship, exhibit the crude features of a rank beginner.
Last edited by DooDoot on Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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sphairos
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Re: Two new books by ven. Anālayo

Post by sphairos »

DooDoot wrote: Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:26 pm
sphairos wrote: Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:21 pm Very funny, thanks! :clap: :clap: :clap:

You've made my day :D
Again, the above is off-topic. Lets move on closer to my objections, where Analayo is close but remains mistaken:
so too sati fulfils an important preparatory role for the arising of wisdom
0 The elephant’s neck, then, represents the quality of giving full attention to a matter at hand as a feature of sati.
The supportive role of sati in the development of wisdom comes up again in a verse from the Sutta Nipãta, where sati keeps the streams in this world in check, so that the faculty of wisdom can cut them off
This verse points in particular to the role of sati in relation to restraint at the sense doors (indriya saÿvara) as a basis for the development of wisdom.
According to these similes, sati is the mental quality that enables wisdom to arise
Compare the above to the following:
One is mindful to abandon wrong view & to enter & remain in right view: This is one's right mindfulness.

MN 117
Because when one has heard the Dhamma from such bhikkhus one dwells withdrawn by way of two kinds of withdrawal—withdrawal of body and withdrawal of mind.

Dwelling thus withdrawn, one recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over. Whenever, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwelling thus withdrawn recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over, on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness is aroused by the bhikkhu; on that occasion the bhikkhu develops the enlightenment factor of mindfulness; on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness comes to fulfilment by development in the bhikkhu.

SN 46.3
Analayo appears to say mindfulness is a cause for the arising of later/future wisdom rather than the role of mindfulness is to bring & keep in mind past learned wisdom.

His writings appear inaccurate generalisation blocking the seamless harmonization of path factors required for stream-entry.
Stop it! It's your Mara heresy!!!

:rofl:
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