Ciggarettes

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cappuccino
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by cappuccino »

ShanYin wrote: Any tips on how to quit smoking?
Smoking is a reliable way to feel pain


And something wants pain
ShanYin
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by ShanYin »

I seem to have alot of sensual desires and it seems to be mixed with desire to relax my mind. It is a craving cycle that never satisfies. I just ran out of ciggarettes now so I am going to try to stop (quit). :tantrum:
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bazzaman
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by bazzaman »

Hello Shan Yin,
I don't know if this will be of any use since it is a personal idiosyncratic way in which I managed to keep off the smokes.
I used to work a job that was seemingly more easily done with coffee and cigarettes on hand. But I had another life in which I would take time off to do meditation retreats, during which I did not smoke.
I came around to a way of thinking about smoking that might not be scientifically accurate, but it felt right to me. I think that smoking provides a feeling of relaxation and fullness of the lungs, which is deceptive. This feeling is perhaps most clearly felt with the first cigarette of the day. Whoosh!
But what is maybe happening is that the actual capacity of the lung is being reduced by the smoking. There is, in a sense, a false floor to the lung. When the first inhalation of smoke hits it then one feels as though one is breathing deeply... but in fact one is not really breathing deep down into the depths. As I said this is probably not scientific.
I also have the view that traumas etc. are somehow locked into the deeper parts of our body image; and that these are not accessible without strong concentration. They are felt as blocks in the body, or, to use another image, knots in the breath (breath body).
Since I had an interest in releasing these blocks I had to come into contact with them... i.e. to breathe more fully and freely. So I had to quit smoking.
It's not easy, of course; but when I made the connection with the motivation to meditation practice then it was possible.
Someone already posted that one should also quit drinking if one also drinks. I had quit drinking years before I quit smoking; and I have to say it was easier to drop the booze than the smokes.
24 years since the last cigarette, and I am still trying to loosen the knots in the breath. So I can't say that my theory has been proven to be accurate (yet). But I'm pretty sure that if I still smoked then I would have dropped the practice long ago.
Anyway, good luck with the quitting, and with your practice.
Atāṇo loko anabhissaro...

Yena yena hi maññanti tato taṃ hoti aññathā,
ShanYin
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by ShanYin »

sunnat wrote: Fri Jun 26, 2020 2:01 am Yes. Just treat it like any craving. It also helps to throw away any tobacco, smoking implements, lighters, ashtray etc. Then note the looking for them.


Edit add. It also is a good idea to wash clothes, bedding pillow caseetc. Tobacco smoke stinks horribly to a non smoker, while it can act as a trigger to someone letting go of the addiction.
May you please go into more detail about the noting method?

When I note "holding" "breathing in" "exhaling" it is hard. I wanted to do this after you suggested it but it seems to add mental noise and ruin my enjoyment of the ciggarette or something.

Could you explain more how to do it?
sunnat
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Re: noting

Post by sunnat »

The Venerable Mahasi Sayādaw in this ( https://www.budsas.org/ebud/mahasi-anat/anat00.htm ) collection of talks regularly talks about noting. Do a search.

There are other good guides to noting. Primarily the Satipatthana Sutta. It helps to ground one in the truth of the present, as it is.
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samseva
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by samseva »

Watch Judson Brewer's (psychiatrist and addiction expert) TED talk and apply what is said.

Also, look into James Clear's book Atomic Habits—particularly the parts about cue/craving/response/reward, and the counter-actions related to these, and with modifying your environment (all these being most of the book).

If the above two don't work, you could look into basic resources on CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) (although the previous video and book should be enough).

Still, resources are useful and important, but the majority comes down to the decision (i.e., cutting off all other options) and determination to just stop. Having good tools definately helps, though.
sunnat
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by sunnat »

Another thing to remember is the importance of persistence and patience.
stephx
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by stephx »

Some ideas to assist you as you work to quit: drink water. Keep a bottle on you at all times and hydrate! This can help a multitude of physical cravings. Remember that nicotine dehydrates, so your body and cells need the nourishment of proper hydration.

If you have the means and you enjoy eating them, keep apples around. Everytime you want to have a smoke, eat an apple. Go outside in the sunshine and enjoy your apple break. The ritual of taking a break to smoke deserves some weaning from as well. Simple fresh fruit or vegetable can serve as a helpful tool (maybe you prefer carrot, for example). The act of taking a break and the stimulation of chewing on something healthy can help you calm and rewire your brain as you make progress on this new journey.

Write. Make a list everyday of your small successes. Take pride as the hours roll into days then weeks where you've overcome your cravings. You can do this.

Lastly, if you are still struggling to resist contemplate the physical ills of smoking that could await: trouble with teeth and gums, skin that weathers quickly, eyes that get cataracts, shortness of breath with cough, etc. These things will trouble you unnecessarily. But they needn't bother you if you honor yourself through your resolve. You're worth it. Set the example for your family who also struggle with this addiction. Be the light to show the way through your actions.

All the best to you.
ShanYin
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by ShanYin »

samseva wrote: Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:00 am Watch Judson Brewer's (psychiatrist and addiction expert) TED talk and apply what is said.

Also, look into James Clear's book Atomic Habits—particularly the parts about cue/craving/response/reward, and the counter-actions related to these, and with modifying your environment (all these being most of the book).

If the above two don't work, you could look into basic resources on CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) (although the previous video and book should be enough).

Still, resources are useful and important, but the majority comes down to the decision (i.e., cutting off all other options) and determination to just stop. Having good tools definately helps, though.
Thanks, I watched the video, I'll have to watch it again sometime. I have the book Atomic Habits, but I'm only on chapter 3 or so.

Yes, resources are helpful. I cut down today from about 50 ciggarettes to about 30 with the help of my counsellor. According to Alan Carr, cutting down does not work. I read Alan Carrs book and the whole thing is supposed to be about his method of quitting but I don't know what it is even after reading it.

I have five 20 packs in my drawer and after reading some statistics and listening to what some people have told me about quitting not working and that you have to just stop I feel like throwing them out. But I would probably just buy more tommorow. I'll keep trying to cut down and then set a quit date.
ShanYin
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by ShanYin »

I am wondering if I am just closed minded towards quitting.
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samseva
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by samseva »

ShanYin wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 5:09 am I have the book Atomic Habits, but I'm only on chapter 3 or so.
Chapter 3 (and the rest the book) is exactly where it talks about the concept of cue/craving/response/reward.
ShanYin wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 5:09 amYes, resources are helpful. I cut down today from about 50 ciggarettes to about 30 with the help of my counsellor. According to Alan Carr, cutting down does not work. I read Alan Carrs book and the whole thing is supposed to be about his method of quitting but I don't know what it is even after reading it.
Like with any addiction/habit, there are two main approaches: "cold turkey" and tapering off. If cold turkey works, then it can the best and quickest option. However, for it to work depends on a number of factors (going cold turkey sometimes even backfires). For some, tapering off might be the best option. In some cases, tapering off might not work and cold turkey might be better, for example. It depends on the person/context. However, both require a 100% complete decision.

Modifying your environment is definitely important though (imagine someone trying to stop drugs, if he continues to hang out with friends who consume drugs).

That and being kind to yourself (i.e., not beating yourself up, and just focusing on making progress when there are genuine mishaps).
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samseva
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by samseva »

stephx wrote: Sat Aug 08, 2020 3:19 am Lastly, if you are still struggling to resist contemplate the physical ills of smoking that could await: trouble with teeth and gums, skin that weathers quickly, eyes that get cataracts, shortness of breath with cough, etc. These things will trouble you unnecessarily. But they needn't bother you if you honor yourself through your resolve. You're worth it. Set the example for your family who also struggle with this addiction. Be the light to show the way through your actions.
I've found this to be an effective way to undo bad habits (use this for other areas as well).

Combining positive motivation and "negative motivation." :smile: Sometimes, the positive results are imensely motivating, but other times you can "live without them," so to speak. However, when you start thinking about the likely negative outcome if you continue to do a specific activity/habit (like serious health problems, not being able to see or spend time with your grandchildren due to premature death), it really wakes you up and makes you realize the importance of the change.

Basically, what I do is sit down and close my eyes, and will usually start with positive motivation—by focussing on the positive reasons for making a change. Then, I'll switch to "negative motivation," by focusing on the likely negative outcomes if I don't make the change I intend.

Strong stuff. :smile: It's basic common sense, but I initially was introduced to this by Tony Robbins (which in turn he got from NLP/neuro-linguistic programming).
ShanYin
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by ShanYin »

I got excited to quit. I just threw out 5 packs of ciggarettes. I am worried in the morning I will give up on my cold turkey attempt and here's the thing. I am worried because if I do start then that means I wasted 5 packs because I started back anyway. That is the wrong thing to be afraid most likely, but that's what it is.
ShanYin
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by ShanYin »

I can think of a positive reason to stop. I won't be engaging in a waste of time that is annoying to run through my mind in the obsessive way that it does. And a negative consequence of not stopping is death.
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Aloka
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Re: Ciggarettes

Post by Aloka »

ShanYin wrote: Sat Jun 20, 2020 3:19 pm Smoking. I smoke alot, lately I have been going through a carton in about 3 days. I decided to start smoking one day, at work as a dishwasher and at the smoking section in high school where I also smoked weed.

How can I quit? I have read Alan Carr's book, it didn't work. I I feel utterly lost in mental phenomena and unpleasant feelings when I meditate on breathing. I can still sit for around 20 minutes though so I think I should keep trying.

Both my parents smoke, my neighbours smoke, and there are two corner stores right next to me where I can buy smokes. Also, I can get cheap cigarettes that my parents bring to me all the time and they lend me money for them. It's preposterous. :toilet:

Any tips on how to quit smoking?

Hi Shan Yin,

I gave up smoking a number of years ago by being determined to stop, and by substituting a piece of sugar - free mint chewing gum for a cigarette.

It worked! Now tobacco (and weed) smell really awful and I have absolutely zero temptation to start again, or to chew any more gum!

:anjali:
.
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