Psychotherapy

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Alexander____
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Psychotherapy

Post by Alexander____ »

I'm thinking about starting psychotherapy training and was wondering if anyone had any information on the relationship between Buddhism and psychotherapy (not western mindfulness).

Thank you in advance.

Alexander
Psychotropic
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by Psychotropic »

Read chapter 5, "The great book" from Samyutta Nikaya. Especially the "4 bases of power" chapter.
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Javi
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by Javi »

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_and_psychology

The references and sources point to a lot of material to look into as well
Vayadhammā saṅkhārā appamādena sampādethā — All things decay and disappoint, it is through vigilance that you succeed — Mahāparinibbāna Sutta

Self-taught poverty is a help toward philosophy, for the things which philosophy attempts to teach by reasoning, poverty forces us to practice. — Diogenes of Sinope

I have seen all things that are done under the sun, and behold, all is vanity and a chase after wind — Ecclesiastes 1.14
Alexander____
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by Alexander____ »

Thank you for these
ieee23
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by ieee23 »

Alexander____ wrote:I'm thinking about starting psychotherapy training and was wondering if anyone had any information on the relationship between Buddhism and psychotherapy (not western mindfulness).
Ajahn Brahm often jokes that he teaches for free what many psychotherapists in his office will teach to their patients for a hefty fee. I think there is a grain of truth in that joke. I've met a lot of psychotherapists and LCSWs at meditation retreats. A lot of the advice people told me their shrinks gave to them sounds a lot like secularized Buddhism and mindfulness.
Whatever a bhikkhu frequently thinks and ponders upon, that will become the inclination of his mind. - MN 19
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pink_trike
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by pink_trike »

ieee23 wrote:
Alexander____ wrote:I've met a lot of psychotherapists and LCSWs at meditation retreats. A lot of the advice people told me their shrinks gave to them sounds a lot like secularized Buddhism and mindfulness.
The practiced refinement of perception, the dissolving of the illusion of self-existence (and attendant self-obsession), the recognition and acceptance of impermanence, the acknowledgement and conscious release of conditioned thought patterns and habitual emotional reactivity, the resulting experience of unfolding clarity by degrees, and the cultivation of skillful relations and effective kindness ... all elements / goals of psychotherapy, are not uniquely 'Buddhist' methods / experiences. All of these practices and their intended benefits were evident in all premodern / ancient cultures and traces of all these cultural traditions are found in modern perception refinement paths, including the countless schools of psychotherapy.

Trained as a psychotherapist, I was influenced by various Western old world and new world philosophers, the natural sciences, ecology, biology, and astronomy, Taoist and Buddhist practices, European nature traditions, and Native American ways of life ... which all have roots extending far back into the mists of time in the form of an ancient global mnemotechnical language / oral tradition (symbolic, allegoric, anthropocentric, ritualistic) that included social / moral codes, historical records, and encoded science (ecology, biology, astronomy). 84,000 paths to waking up ... all one path.
Vision is Mind
Mind is Empty
Emptiness is Clear Light
Clear Light is Union
Union is Great Bliss

- Dawa Gyaltsen

---

Disclaimer: I'm a non-religious practitioner of Theravada, Mahayana/Vajrayana, and Tibetan Bon Dzogchen mind-training.
JohnK
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by JohnK »

pink_trike wrote:...84,000 paths to waking up ... all one path.
Just for another take on it (from Thanissaro Bhikkhu):
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... icism.html
Those who grasp at perceptions & views wander the internet creating friction. [based on Sn4:9,v.847]
form
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by form »

Alexander____ wrote:I'm thinking about starting psychotherapy training and was wondering if anyone had any information on the relationship between Buddhism and psychotherapy (not western mindfulness).

Thank you in advance.

Alexander
I have a complete Freud and Jung theory on buddhism. But I do not dare to share it here. I will get kick in my ass. :mrgreen:
R1111 = rightviewftw
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by R1111 = rightviewftw »

Relationship is that of a precious jewel and a worthless substitute copy, might fool most people with it but it wont fool wise people and doesnt do much else really.

Afaik Therapists are most prone commit suicide as well fwiw. Id engage carefully and out of necessity or convenience rather than putting my mental health in their hands or adopting their views, ofc there are xceptions as some therapists are teaching more or less effective methods.
Alexander____
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by Alexander____ »

Therapists aren't on any top 10 of suicides I've seen. Usually it's farmers, doctors and dentists

http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/the ... ide-rates/

http://www.newhealthguide.org/Highest-S ... ssion.html
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Sam Vara
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by Sam Vara »

I don't have anything substantive to add on the relationship between Buddhism and Psychotherapy, merely an observation. Where I live (United Kingdom) psychotherapists and counsellors are almost certainly the largest two occupational groups among the Western convert Buddhists. (Teachers are probably the next largest group.) It has led to wry humour within our meditation group:

"I got a call today from a person who saw our flyer at the monastery and wants to join our group."

"That's great! Another psychotherapist?"
R1111 = rightviewftw
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by R1111 = rightviewftw »

Alexander____ wrote:Therapists aren't on any top 10 of suicides I've seen. Usually it's farmers, doctors and dentists

http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/the ... ide-rates/

http://www.newhealthguide.org/Highest-S ... ssion.html
Still seems to me that both psycho and physi therapists are on the top and this will actually include psychologists and psychiatrists, they are probably the higher than doctors afaik. There are several reasons for this like alot of people interested in mental health are interested for a reason like self-help and looking at the fathers of modern psychology they aren't the best examples to follow as far as views and these people have access to drugs often. :stirthepot:

I may have hyperboled it but here are some sources:
In a national sample of 800 psychologists, Pope and Tabachnick (1994) found that most participants had been in therapy, and, of those, 61% reported that they had suffered at least one episode of clinical depression. Over one in four (29%) disclosed that they had felt suicidal, and nearly 4% reported having made a suicide attempt.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3124780/

This is quite controversial topic and there are contradicting results of various studies, alot of invested interest & politics it seems but i think its fair to say they are not very healthy as a population in general esp relative to The Sangha.

They dont even properly teach or practse meditation so it is no wonder they dont know how to effectively help people often.

I may be wrong tho, but it seemed to be the conclusion i came to when i was reading into it few years ago.
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Kamran
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by Kamran »

The founders of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), like Albert Ellis, were highly influenced by Buddhism and the Greek Stoic Philosophers.

There are a lot of similarities, and I believe CBT compliments buddhist practice.

CBT has been shown to be highly effective.
"Silence gives answers"

Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi
R1111 = rightviewftw
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by R1111 = rightviewftw »

I also think that behavioral psychology and endocrinologists have figured a far lot more relative to other related "scientific" branches.
maybe i shouldve rant in the other thread :?
Last edited by R1111 = rightviewftw on Tue Mar 28, 2017 2:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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pink_trike
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Re: Psychotherapy

Post by pink_trike »

R1111 wrote: Afaik Therapists are most prone commit suicide as well fwiw.
Do you happen to have any data that supports this seemingly wild claim? :jumping: Us therapists tend to be a weird lot but having been in the biz for decades, I've never heard of a therapist committing suicide. I think you mean doctors and dentists are the most prone to suicide:

http://mentalhealthdaily.com/2015/01/06 ... ide-rates/
R1111 wrote: Relationship is that of a precious jewel and a worthless substitute copy
Therapists don't claim to be able to send you to your favorite Buddhist heaven, but as a group we do a pretty awesome job of reduce suffering, helping people recover from terrible experiences, assisting people in becoming happier and more effective human beings, and even saving human lives. What's your occupation ... can you say the same? :smile:
Vision is Mind
Mind is Empty
Emptiness is Clear Light
Clear Light is Union
Union is Great Bliss

- Dawa Gyaltsen

---

Disclaimer: I'm a non-religious practitioner of Theravada, Mahayana/Vajrayana, and Tibetan Bon Dzogchen mind-training.
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