How to meditate?

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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JC938
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How to meditate?

Post by JC938 »

Hi,

My age is 30 and I have known about Buddhism since I knew how to read and write because I'm Thai. But I haven't really meditate even once properly. I have tried many times, and would fail because I don't have proper knowledge regarding - How to meditate.

So, I'm confuse right now, what is vipassana, what is anapanasati, what is satipathan 4 etc..

So, here I want to ask.

What is the difference between vipassana, anapanasati and satipathan 4. How are they related?

vipassana means watching the mind of the arising of thoughts am I correct? And anapanasati is watching the in and out of breath, correct? and satipathan 4 is being mindful of body (which is basically breathing, so here is means practicing anapanasati? Am I correct?, feeling, and I'm not sure what other 2 are, please also explain satipathan 4 properly.

And if I want to meditate, do I focus on anapanasati or vipassana or satipathan 4?

Please summarize and guide me so I see clearly see what these meditation technique means and how do i start practicing meditation.

Thanks.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0wVrqt0euc - This mantra will guide you to Nibbana. It means:
Lead me from unreal to real,
lead me from darkness to light,
lead me from death to immortality.

It's a prayer to God to guide and lead you to Nibbana.
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DooDoot
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by DooDoot »

JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pm I'm Thai.
Just like many Thais, many Sri Lankans are clueless about Buddhism. This said, I first learned Buddhism in Thailand from Tan Ajahn Buddhadasa (พุทธทาสภิกขุ).
JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pmWhat is the difference between vipassana, anapanasati and satipathan 4. How are they related?
Anapanasati means the breathing arises as the meditation sign or meditation object when the mind has the right mindfulness that remembers to always keep the mind free from craving & attachment.

Satipatthana means "establishing mindfulness" and is used to describe four naturally occurring meditation objects (body, feelings, quality of mind and Truth) when the mind has right mindfulness.

There is no difference between Anapanasati & Satipatthana. MN 118 says the perfecting of Anapanasati results in the perfecting of Satipatthana.

Vipassana means "clear seeing" or "special seeing". It is not a meditative technique but is a result or fruit of Anapanasati & Satipatthana. MN 149 says when Anapanasati/Satipatthana is developed, two results occur in tandem, namely, samatha (calm) and vipassana (insight).

Vipassana clearly sees the Four Noble Truths and Three Characteristics. For example, if you are practising Anapanasati and see clearly each in breath & each out breath is impermanent & not-self, this is vipassana. If you are practising Anapanasati and see clearly each time the mind clings or craves the breathing becomes agitated & disturbed, this is vipassana. If you are practising Anapanasati and see clearly when the mind is free from craving & attachment, the breath calms and the body calms and the mind calms, this is vipassana.

Vipassana means to see cause & effect, the Four Noble Truths (about arising & ceasing of suffering) and the Three Characteristics of impermanence, unsatisfactoriness & not-self.
JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pmvipassana means watching the mind of the arising of thoughts am I correct?
No.
JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pmAnd anapanasati is watching the in and out of breath, correct?
No. Anapanasati means remembering to have Right View each time you breathe in and breathe out.
JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pm and satipathan 4 is being mindful of body (which is basically breathing, so here is means practicing anapanasati? Am I correct?,
Yes. The above is the 1st of 4 satipatthana.
JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pm feeling, and I'm not sure what other 2 are, please also explain satipathan 4 properly.
If you can practise breathing (1st satipatthana) meditation well, the mind becomes very sensitive to pleasant & unpleasant feelings (2nd satipatthana) and also sensitive to the quality of the mind/cit/citta (3rd satipatthana) and sensitive to ultimate reality, such as impermanence & not-self (4th satipatthana).
JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pm And if I want to meditate, do I focus on anapanasati or vipassana or satipathan 4?
The Buddha mostly emphasized Anapanasati to his disciples (e.g MN 62) and even said Anapanasati is the "Dwelling of the Tathagata" (SN 54.11).
JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pmPlease summarize and guide me so I see clearly see what these meditation technique means and how do i start practicing meditation.
You start practising meditation by cleansing & keeping the mind free from the Five Hindrances, craving, attachment & clinging. The suttas instruct:
MN 38 wrote:Endowed with this noble aggregate of virtue, this noble restraint over the sense faculties, this noble mindfulness & alertness, he seeks out a secluded dwelling: a wilderness, the shade of a tree, a mountain, a glen, a hillside cave, a charnel ground, a forest grove, the open air, a heap of straw. After his meal, returning from his alms round, he sits down, crosses his legs, holds his body erect, and brings mindfulness to the fore.

Abandoning covetousness with regard to the world, he dwells with an awareness devoid of covetousness. He cleanses his mind of covetousness. Abandoning ill will & anger, he dwells with an awareness devoid of ill will, sympathetic with the welfare of all living beings. He cleanses his mind of ill will & anger. Abandoning sloth & drowsiness, he dwells with an awareness devoid of sloth & drowsiness, mindful, alert, percipient of light. He cleanses his mind of sloth & drowsiness. Abandoning restlessness & anxiety, he dwells undisturbed, his mind inwardly stilled. He cleanses his mind of restlessness & anxiety. Abandoning uncertainty, he dwells having crossed over uncertainty, with no perplexity with regard to skillful mental qualities. He cleanses his mind of uncertainty.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
Kind regards :ugeek:
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/anapanasati
coconut
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by coconut »

JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pm Hi,


Please summarize and guide me so I see clearly see what these meditation technique means and how do i start practicing meditation.

Thanks.
24/7 - sense restraint and sati-sampajanna:
“Bhikkhus, this is how Nanda guards the doors of the sense faculties: If he needs to look to the east, he does so after he has fully considered the matter and clearly comprehends it thus: ‘When I look to the east, bad unwholesome states of longing and dejection will not flow in upon me.’ If he needs to look to the west … to the north … to the south … to look up … to look down … to survey the intermediate directions, he does so after he has fully considered the matter and clearly comprehends it thus: ‘When I look to the intermediate directions, bad unwholesome states of longing and dejection will not flow in upon me.’ That is how Nanda guards the doors of the sense faculties.
“This is Nanda’s mindfulness and clear comprehension: Nanda knows feelings as they arise, as they remain present, as they disappear; he knows perceptions as they arise, as they remain present, as they disappear; he knows thoughts as they arise, as they remain present, as they disappear. That is Nanda’s mindfulness and clear comprehension.
24/7 - checking your mind for 5 hindrances
"And how is a monk skilled in reading his own mind? Imagine a young woman — or man — fond of adornment, examining the image of her own face in a bright, clean mirror or bowl of clear water: If she saw any dirt or blemish there, she would try to remove it. If she saw no dirt or blemish there, she would be pleased, her resolves fulfilled: 'How fortunate I am! How clean I am!' In the same way, a monk's self-examination is very productive in terms of skillful qualities:[2] 'Do I usually remain covetous or not? With thoughts of ill will or not? Overcome by sloth & drowsiness or not? Restless or not? Uncertain or gone beyond uncertainty? Angry or not? With soiled thoughts or unsoiled thoughts? With my body aroused or unaroused? Lazy or with persistence aroused? Unconcentrated or concentrated?'

24/7 - wakefulness
“This is how Nanda is intent on wakefulness: During the day, while walking back and forth and sitting, Nanda purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. In the first watch of the night, while walking back and forth and sitting, he purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. In the middle watch of the night he lies down on the right side in the lion’s posture, with one foot overlapping the other, mindful and clearly comprehending, after noting in his mind the idea of rising. After rising, in the last watch of the night, while walking back and forth and sitting, he purifies his mind of obstructive qualities. That is how Nanda is intent on wakefulness.
24/7 - proper attention. Applying the appropriate antidote to combat the arisen hindrances:


Since that is so, he attends to those things unfit for attention and he does not attend to those things fit for attention.

“What are the things unfit for attention that he attends to? They are things such that when he attends to them, the unarisen taint of sensual desire arises in him and the arisen taint of sensual desire increases, the unarisen taint of being arises in him and the arisen taint of being increases, the unarisen taint of ignorance arises in him and the arisen taint of ignorance increases. These are the things unfit for attention that he attends to. And what are the things fit for attention that he does not attend to? They are things such that when he attends to them, the unarisen taint of sensual desire does not arise in him and the arisen taint of sensual desire is abandoned, the unarisen taint of being does not arise in him and the arisen taint of being is abandoned, the unarisen taint of ignorance does not arise in him and the arisen taint of ignorance is abandoned. These are the things fit for attention that he does not attend to. By attending to things unfit for attention and by not attending to things fit for attention, both unarisen taints arise in him and arisen taints increase.
“He attends wisely: ‘This is suffering’; he attends wisely: ‘This is the origin of suffering’; he attends wisely: ‘This is the cessation of suffering’; he attends wisely: ‘This is the way leading to the cessation of suffering.’ When he attends wisely in this way, three fetters are abandoned in him: personality view, doubt, and adherence to rules and observances. These are called the taints that should be abandoned by seeing.
“What taints, bhikkhus, should be abandoned by removing? Here a bhikkhu, reflecting wisely, does not tolerate an arisen thought of sensual desire; he abandons it, removes it, does away with it, and annihilates it. He does not tolerate an arisen thought of ill will…He does not tolerate an arisen thought of cruelty…He does not tolerate arisen evil unwholesome states; he abandons them, removes them, does away with them, and annihilates them. While taints, vexation, and fever might arise in one who does not remove these thoughts, there are no taints, vexation, or fever in one who removes them. These are called the taints that should be abandoned by removing.

- Nutriments for 5 hindrances vs factors of awakening - https://suttacentral.net/sn46.51/en/bodhi
And how are there three kinds of mental conduct in accordance with the Dhamma, righteous conduct? Here someone is not covetous: he is not a coveter of another's chattels and property thus: 'Oh, that what is another's were mine!' He has no mind of ill-will, with the intention of a mind unaffected by hate thus: 'May these beings be free from enmity, affliction and anxiety, may they live happily!' He has right view, undistorted vision, thus: 'There is what is given and what is offered and what is sacrificed, and there is fruit and ripening of good and bad kammas, and there is this world and the other world and mother and father and spontaneously (born) beings, and good and virtuous monks and brahmans that have themselves realized by direct knowledge and declared this world and the other world.' That is how there are three kinds of mental conduct in accordance with the Dhamma, righteous conduct.
- mn 41


Spend the day mostly in meditation and partly in sutta study:
"Then there is the case where a monk studies the Dhamma: dialogues, narratives of mixed prose and verse, explanations, verses, spontaneous exclamations, quotations, birth stories, amazing events, question & answer sessions. He doesn't spend the day in Dhamma-study. He doesn't neglect seclusion. He commits himself to internal tranquillity of awareness. This is called a monk who dwells in the Dhamma.
You should study samma ditthi sutta to know what is wholesome/unwholesome
coconut
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by coconut »

JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pm Hi
vipassana means watching the mind of the arising of thoughts am I correct? And anapanasati is watching the in and out of breath, correct? and satipathan 4 is being mindful of body (which is basically breathing, so here is means practicing anapanasati? Am I correct?, feeling, and I'm not sure what other 2 are, please also explain satipathan 4 properly.
No. That's sati-sampajanna. Vipassana means seeing the drawbacks of what has arisen. Becoming aware of what has arisen is sampajanna, knowing if it's good or bad is sati, seeing the drawbacks is vipassana, and samatha is calming what has arisen.

See Giriminanda sutta on how to see the drawbacks: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
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DooDoot
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by DooDoot »

coconut wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 1:18 pm Vipassana means seeing the drawbacks ...
Merely one vipassana from many...
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/anapanasati
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cappuccino
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by cappuccino »

JC938 wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:10 pm How to meditate.
be calm


then focus on impermanence


that's all
"All men's souls are immortal, but the souls of the righteous are immortal and divine." -Socrates
Good for Your Soul
befriend
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by befriend »

Dharmaseed.org Has guided theravadan meditations from bhikkhus and lay teachers.
Take care of mindfulness and mindfulness will take care of you.
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Aloka
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by Aloka »

There are basic meditation instructions in the little book "Finding the Missing Peace– a Primer of Buddhist Meditation " by Ajahn Amaro:

https://www.amaravati.org/dhamma-books/ ... editation/

:anjali:

.
JC938
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by JC938 »

Thanks alot everyone. It helps alot.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0wVrqt0euc - This mantra will guide you to Nibbana. It means:
Lead me from unreal to real,
lead me from darkness to light,
lead me from death to immortality.

It's a prayer to God to guide and lead you to Nibbana.
ToVincent
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by ToVincent »

Aloka wrote: Fri Jan 15, 2021 4:27 am There are basic meditation instructions in the little book "Finding the Missing Peace– a Primer of Buddhist Meditation " by Ajahn Amaro:

https://www.amaravati.org/dhamma-books/ ... editation/
Ajahn Amaro—Finding the missing peace wrote: Ajahn Chah,... emphasised that we should approach meditation in the way the Buddha intended it to be used, which was to help us develop qualities of peacefulness and clarity, to learn how to understand our own lives and to learn how to live harmoniously with the world.
....
The intent is that there will be an understanding and therefore a deeper harmonisation with life. That’s what is really meant by “meditation” here.
?!?!
-----
Ajahn Amaro—Finding the missing peace wrote: On the physical level, the main thing to pay attention to is the spine, which should be straight.
...
The spine is the axis of the world in meditation; it is the central element around which all the rest revolves or is arranged.
YES
-----
Ajahn Amaro—Finding the missing peace wrote: In the beginning, one must pick up the attention and place it consciously on the breath.
YES
Ajahn Amaro—Finding the missing peace wrote: In this form of Buddhist meditation, one does not look at the cosmic, symbolic aspects of the breath or try to bring about any sort of energetic effects with the breath.
YES (only pleasures and distinction).
Ajahn Amaro—Finding the missing peace wrote: One simply takes the natural rhythm of the breath as it happens to flow, whether it’s short or long, deep or shallow, whether it’s a consistent rhythm or changes over and over - however the breath happens to come is accepted and used as the object of meditation.
?!?!
-----
Ajahn Amaro—Finding the missing peace wrote: When the mind rests easily with the present, one can let go of the breath*as a special object. The whole of the present moment then becomes the focus.
?!?!
*Breathes (high & low—Digha & rassa), and their associated feeling (sukha and piti)

He should examine the Dhamma from the origin,
and have insight where there is distinction.
Yoniso vicine dhammaṃ,
paññāyatthaṃ vipassati.
AN 7.3

Like the extinguishing of a lamp
is the liberation from the ceto.
Pajjotasseva nibbānaṃ,
vimokkho hoti cetaso”ti.
AN 7.3
- Cetaso ekodibhāva (transcendence of ceto).
- Pīti (mano-like pleasure — born of samādhi [establishment]).
- Sukkha ("citta-like" pleasure — born of samādhi).
- Indifference (abscence of raga) towards the mano-like pleasure.
- Upekkhako (upa-√ īkṣ ) looking down (viz. from the origin).
- Sato (thoughtful [from the acquisition]) (sati: https://justpaste.it/53vyj)
- Sampajāno (complete (clear) distinction between the two)
- Sukhañca kāyena ("citta-like" pleasure with the body-breath).
- etc.

The suttas explain it all (in very few words) - providing that you have a proper historical lexicography.
.
.
Some working for the Mara's world; some for the Brahma's world; some for the Unborn.
.
Those who desire good are few, and those who desire evil are many.
Buddha
(And you just can't imagine how much goodness, those who desire evil, are ready to display - ToVincent).
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Aloka
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Re: How to meditate?

Post by Aloka »

To Vincent..

and your point in picking through a little book I referenced which has been helpful to many people - is what? Plus having been to a lot of Ajahn Amaro's talks at Amaravati Monastery, I'm pretty sure he has a lot more knowledge of meditation and the suttas than you think you have yourself!

:shrug:
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