Venerable Dhammanando's video

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jabalí
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Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by jabalí »

I came across this video of Venerable Dhammanando by chance, where he gives meditation instructions that someone translates into another language.
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Bundokji
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by Bundokji »

Thanks for sharing :anjali:
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.
Dan74
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by Dan74 »

Sadhu, Bhante.

:bow: :bow: :bow:
_/|\_
The2nd
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by The2nd »

jabalí wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 6:23 pm I came across this video of Venerable Dhammanando by chance, where he gives meditation instructions that someone translates into another language.
How does holding your body in various constricted positions, be conducive to gaining knowledge, let alone simple relaxation?
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Sam Vara
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by Sam Vara »

The2nd wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:16 pm
How does holding your body in various constricted positions, be conducive to gaining knowledge, let alone simple relaxation?
There doesn't seem to be any constriction there. Bhante actually explains how to remove tension from the shoulders and neck, and to sit comfortably. If you mean that he is sitting with his legs crossed, he has lots of practice! At the start he is sitting in a chair, and if that's more comfortable, that is what one should do.
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DNS
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by DNS »

You never know what will come up during your meditation. Check out the dog blocking the path of walking meditation, around the 10:00 mark. That's good that wasn't edited out.
The2nd
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by The2nd »

Sam Vara wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:22 pm
The2nd wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:16 pm
How does holding your body in various constricted positions, be conducive to gaining knowledge, let alone simple relaxation?
There doesn't seem to be any constriction there. Bhante actually explains how to remove tension from the shoulders and neck, and to sit comfortably. If you mean that he is sitting with his legs crossed, he has lots of practice! At the start he is sitting in a chair, and if that's more comfortable, that is what one should do.
Well, to me he looks pretty tense, especially in the shoulders, but thats not really important of course. Or is it?
My question is, how is such bodily positions conducive to gaining knowledge of Dhamma?

To me, this is not meditation instructions but simple instructions on how to sit or walk, and i think most people already know how to do this.
If a person does not walk so awkwardly, noting the foot movements etc, does this mean that they cannot attain higher knowledges?
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Bundokji
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by Bundokji »

The2nd wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:16 pm How does holding your body in various constricted positions, be conducive to gaining knowledge, let alone simple relaxation?
One of the things came to my mind when i watched the venerable doing walking meditation is how similar our walking to the nature of phenomena. The venerable noting was: lifting-moving-placing while the Buddha described phenomena as rising-persisting-falling.

I have also read that the lotus position and other sitting meditation postures achieves good balance between effort, mindfulness and concentration.

Considering that phenomena is a construct, and that the mind and the body are not separate, one can imagine how conducive these constructed positions can be to insight.
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.
The2nd
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by The2nd »

Bundokji wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:40 pm
The2nd wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:16 pm How does holding your body in various constricted positions, be conducive to gaining knowledge, let alone simple relaxation?
One of the things came to my mind when i watched the venerable doing walking meditation is how similar our walking to the nature of phenomena. The venerable noting was: lifting-moving-placing while the Buddha described phenomena as rising-persisting-falling.

I have also read that the lotus position and other sitting meditation postures achieves good balance between effort, mindfulness and concentration.

Considering that phenomena is a construct, and that the mind and the body are not separate, one can imagine how conducive these constructed positions can be to insight.
Of course, anything is possible in imagination.
Simply saying that the lotus position balances the enlightenment factors ,doesnt make it so, if it did then its a pretty easy is task, and also impossible to achieve for those who cannot sit in lotus.

If you do not sit in such a manner, do you equally become unbalanced in mind?

If putting the body in a certain position gave rise to liberating mental insights, then why is this not taught by the Buddha? Because its quite a simple instruction, and so why did the Buddha not teach it?

As for the movements of the foot while walking being similar to the nature of phenomena, I dont see how making that connection is relavent?
Im trying to find a sutta says that the nature of phenomena is rising-persisting-falling, but I cannot, could you send me a link? I think its in the Anguttara nikaya?
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Bundokji
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by Bundokji »

The2nd wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:17 am Of course, anything is possible in imagination.
Simply saying that the lotus position balances the enlightenment factors ,doesnt make it so, if it did then its a pretty easy is task, and also impossible to achieve for those who cannot sit in lotus.

If you do not sit in such a manner, do you equally become unbalanced in mind?

If putting the body in a certain position gave rise to liberating mental insights, then why is this not taught by the Buddha? Because its quite a simple instruction, and so why did the Buddha not teach it?

As for the movements of the foot while walking being similar to the nature of phenomena, I dont see how making that connection is relavent?
Im trying to find a sutta says that the nature of phenomena is rising-persisting-falling, but I cannot, could you send me a link? I think its in the Anguttara nikaya?
You might find the following thread relevant

https://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?t=7594
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.
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Coëmgenu
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by Coëmgenu »

The2nd wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:34 pmWell, to me he looks pretty tense, especially in the shoulders, but thats not really important of course. Or is it?
Perhaps you don't know, but Ven Dhammanando is a participant at this very forum. You could ask him yourself how he was feeling that day, as he likely remembers, then you can know for certain if he was having an awkward time getting the recording done. That is probably a better method to get to the bottom of things than examining how his shoulders look in the finished product.
The thus come thus gone,
who has neither came nor went,
enthroned on men’s breath,

like the still turtle,
withdraws six appendages
and is clothed in light --

illuminating
the unilluminated
with three shining cures.
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Bundokji
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by Bundokji »

The2nd wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:17 am
Im trying to find a sutta says that the nature of phenomena is rising-persisting-falling, but I cannot, could you send me a link? I think its in the Anguttara nikaya?
"And what is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to mindfulness & alertness? There is the case where feelings are known to the monk as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. Perceptions are known to him as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. Thoughts are known to him as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. This is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to mindfulness & alertness.
https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.
The2nd
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by The2nd »

Coëmgenu wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:50 am
The2nd wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:34 pmWell, to me he looks pretty tense, especially in the shoulders, but thats not really important of course. Or is it?
Perhaps you don't know, but Ven Dhammanando is a participant at this very forum. You could ask him yourself how he was feeling that day, as he likely remembers, then you can know for certain if he was having an awkward time getting the recording done. That is probably a better method to get to the bottom of things than examining how his shoulders look in the finished product.
Well, as i said its of course not important, whether he was relaxed or not but rather what is interesting is the idea that bodily positioning is meditation or that which helps you understand the Dhamma.
The2nd
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by The2nd »

Bundokji wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:53 am
The2nd wrote: Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:17 am
Im trying to find a sutta says that the nature of phenomena is rising-persisting-falling, but I cannot, could you send me a link? I think its in the Anguttara nikaya?
"And what is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to mindfulness & alertness? There is the case where feelings are known to the monk as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. Perceptions are known to him as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. Thoughts are known to him as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. This is the development of concentration that, when developed & pursued, leads to mindfulness & alertness.
https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
Thanks. I see, so that practice of being aware of the particular perception of ones foot moving up and down , will lead to mindfulness and alertness, which one doesnt have yet. ?
SarathW
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Re: Venerable Dhammanando's video

Post by SarathW »

It is a good video.
I like to know whether Ven. Dhammanado still practice the same way.
I have done my first only one-day meditation program with Ven. Ellawala Vijithanada.
What he said was simply to be aware of the movement (kayanupassana) and sensation of the foot touching the ground (vedanupassana).
I like to know the opinion of Ven. Dhammanando.

Perhaps the dogs sensed this is something to do with the walking path so they also want to take part in it.
:D
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”
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