Maranasati

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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befriend
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Maranasati

Post by befriend »

I'd like to include maranasati mindfulness of death into my daily Dhamma practice. But am unsure how often does one consider the fragility of life and that death can come anytime? Thanks!
Take care of mindfulness and mindfulness will take care of you.
Srilankaputra
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Re: Maranasati

Post by Srilankaputra »

Experienced forest rangers don't lose their sense of direction, even when they travel deep inside the forest. If it were me I would probably get lost straight away, but it's possible with training.

Mendicants, these five things, when developed and cultivated, have freedom of heart and freedom by wisdom as their fruit and benefit.
_Pañcime, bhikkhave, dhammā bhāvitā bahulīkatā cetovimuttiphalā ca honti cetovimuttiphalānisaṁsā ca, paññāvimuttiphalā ca honti paññāvimuttiphalānisaṁsā ca.

What five?

A mendicant meditates observing the ugliness of the body, perceives the repulsiveness of food, perceives dissatisfaction with the whole world, observes the impermanence of all conditions, and has well established the perception of their own death.
_Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu asubhānupassī kāye viharati, āhāre paṭikūlasaññī, sabbaloke anabhiratasaññī, sabbasaṅkhāresu aniccānupassī, maraṇasaññā kho panassa ajjhattaṁ sūpaṭṭhitā hoti.
https://suttacentral.net/an5.71/en/sujato

Wish you all success in all your endeavours. Goodbye!
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DooDoot
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Re: Maranasati

Post by DooDoot »

My cousin passed away from cancer 3 days ago. Was not very old. :geek:
“Here, monks, when the day is ending and the night is returning, a monk considers: ‘There are many causes of death: A snake might bite me, or a scorpion might sting me, or a centipede might sting me, and I might die as a result – that would be inconvenient for me. Or I might stumble and fall, or a meal I have eaten might make me sick, or my bile could become disturbed, or my phlegm might become disturbed, or knife-like winds might disturb me, and I might die as a result – that would be inconvenient for me.’ Monks, that monk should consider, ‘Are there any harmful, unwholesome phenomena in me that have not been abandoned, and which would be obstructive to me if I were to die tonight?’

“Monks, when a monk is reflecting in this way, if he knows, ‘There are harmful, unwholesome phenomena in me that have not been abandoned and which would be obstructive to me if I were to die tonight,’ then, monks, that monk should produce extraordinary interest, effort, exertion, and striving, with unfailing mindfulness and awareness, in order to abandon those harmful, unwholesome phenomena

http://bhantesuddhaso.com/teachings/sut ... ati-sutta/
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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pegembara
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Re: Maranasati

Post by pegembara »

befriend wrote: Mon May 31, 2021 2:41 pm I'd like to include maranasati mindfulness of death into my daily Dhamma practice. But am unsure how often does one consider the fragility of life and that death can come anytime? Thanks!
One meal at a time -> the last meal on death row.
One mouthful at a time or
One breath at a time -->https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/258 ... ecomes-air
Everyone succumbs to finitude. I suspect I am not the only one who reaches this pluperfect state. Most ambitions are either achieved or abandoned; either way, they belong to the past. The future, instead of the ladder toward the goals of life, flattens out into a perpetual present. Paul Kalanithi
Read more at https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/pau ... thi-quotes
It's going, going, gone.
When this was said, the Blessed One addressed the monks. "Whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, 'O, that I might live for a day & night... for a day... for the interval that it takes to eat a meal... for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up four morsels of food, that I might attend to the Blessed One's instructions. I would have accomplished a great deal' — they are said to dwell heedlessly. They develop mindfulness of death slowly for the sake of ending the effluents.

"But whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, 'O, that I might live for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up one morsel of food... for the interval that it takes to breathe out after breathing in, or to breathe in after breathing out, that I might attend to the Blessed One's instructions. I would have accomplished a great deal' — they are said to dwell heedfully. They develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech.
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bodom
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Re: Maranasati

Post by bodom »

I use whatever comes up in the course of the day to reflect on death.. whether it is news reports of accidental deaths, murders, suicides or roadkill when walking down the street, even leaves falling from the trees..there is always an opportunity to bring home the truth of our inevitable destination.

:anjali:
This is our foundation: to have sati, recollection, and sampajañña, self-awareness, whether standing, walking, sitting, or reclining. Whatever arises, just leave it be, don’t cling to it. Whether it’s like or dislike, happiness or suffering, doubt or certainty... Don’t try to label everything, just know it. See that all the things that arise in the mind are simply sensations. They are transient. They arise, exist and cease. That’s all there is to them, they have no self or being, they are neither ‘us’ nor ‘them’. None of them are worthy of clinging to.

- Ajahn Chah
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mjaviem
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Re: Maranasati

Post by mjaviem »

befriend wrote: Mon May 31, 2021 2:41 pm ... am unsure how often does one consider the fragility of life and that death can come anytime...
I would say all the time.
AN 6.19 Thanissaro wrote:‘O, that I might live… for the interval that it takes to breathe out after breathing in, or to breathe in after breathing out, that I might attend to the Blessed One’s instructions...’
EDIT: I mean, that's the whole point of being mindful, isn't it? You have to always keep in mind that you can die and to attend to the Blessed One's instructions.
Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambuddhassa
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