What about drinking Kombucha?

Buddhist ethical conduct including the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).
budo
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Re: What about drinking Kombucha?

Post by budo »

And more on Kombucha
Though kombucha may have potential health benefits, it can be dangerous to drink because many of its risks are still unknown. Unsanitary kombucha can cause death, organ failure, and there’s even been one report of cutaneous anthrax. Additionally there has been a new report of a woman who drank kombucha, which was found to not be unsanitary but potentially contaminated, who suffered from liver inflammation.
https://examine.com/nutrition/an-update ... -toxicity/

Fermenting sugars in general is a bad idea, let alone using fungus rather than conventional bacteria.
SarathW
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Re: What about drinking Kombucha?

Post by SarathW »

Can you drink Kombucha and drive without exceeding the limit.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”
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retrofuturist
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Re: What about drinking Kombucha?

Post by retrofuturist »

Greetings Sarath,
SarathW wrote: Mon May 27, 2019 12:30 am Can you drink Kombucha and drive without exceeding the limit.
That probably depends on your local laws. Here in Australia, the standard limit is a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) level of 0.05. However, for learners and probationers it's 0.00. These "learners" need to be very careful to avoid cough syrups, soy sauce, liqueur-filled chocolates, or anything else that may contain trace elements of alcohol.

As for kombucha sold in stores and at the supermarket, there is no physical way you could get yourself to a BAC of 0.05 with it.

Metta,
Paul. :)
"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"Why now do you assume 'a being'? Mara, have you grasped a view?" (SN 5.10)

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Digity
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Re: What about drinking Kombucha?

Post by Digity »

I asked the same question here.

viewtopic.php?f=42&t=32725

I make my own kombucha and I've never felt drunk from drinking it. I don't think it has the intoxicating effect of say beer or wine, so that's why I keep drinking it.
sentinel
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Re: What about drinking Kombucha?

Post by sentinel »

Guinness Malta serve cold taste good .
You always gain by giving
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AgarikaJ
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Re: What about drinking Kombucha?

Post by AgarikaJ »

To find out if an action would go into a direction which is potentially unwholesome, it is maybe a good guideline to have a look into the Vinaya. Even though laypeople do not need to heed those rules, they give a general yardstick of proper and moral behaviour in a Buddhist sense.

Here, we find the following:
As for alcohol cooked in oil, this refers to a medicine used in the Buddha’s time for afflictions of the “wind element.” The Mahāvagga (VI.14.1) allows this medicine for internal use only as long as the taste, color, and smell of the alcohol are not perceptible. From this point, the Vinaya-mukha argues that morphine and other narcotics used as pain killers are allowable as well.
In addition, the non-offense clauses contain a phrase that can be read in two different ways. The first way would be, “With regard to molasses and emblic myrobalan, (there is no offense) if he drinks unfermented ariṭṭha.” This is the way the Commentary interprets the phrase, which it explains as follows: Ariṭṭha is the name of an aged medicine, made from emblic myrobalan, etc., whose color taste, and smell are like alcohol, but which is not alcoholic. This item, however, would seem to come under the first non-offense clause. Another way to read the phrase would be to take ariṭṭha as an adjective, which would yield, “With regard to molasses and emblic myrobalan, (there is no offense) if he drinks what has not fermented and not turned bad.” Perhaps the mixture of emblic myrobalan and molasses was used to make a type of toddy, in which case the allowance would grant permission for the mixture to be drunk before it had fermented. This allowance could then be extended to liquids like apple cider consumed before it has turned alcoholic.
But also:
Perception as to whether a liquid counts as alcohol or liquor is not a mitigating factor here (see Pc 4). Thus a bhikkhu drinking champagne that he thinks to be carbonated apple juice would fall under this factor, regardless of his ignorance.
Now everybody needs to make up their minds for themselves, which of the two they want to give more weight in their personal practice.
The teaching is a lake with shores of ethics, unclouded, praised by the fine to the good.
There the knowledgeable go to bathe, and cross to the far shore without getting wet.
[SN 7.21]
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Dan74-MkII
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Re: What about drinking Kombucha?

Post by Dan74-MkII »

retrofuturist wrote: Mon May 27, 2019 12:38 am Greetings Sarath,
SarathW wrote: Mon May 27, 2019 12:30 am Can you drink Kombucha and drive without exceeding the limit.
That probably depends on your local laws. Here in Australia, the standard limit is a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) level of 0.05. However, for learners and probationers it's 0.00. These "learners" need to be very careful to avoid cough syrups, soy sauce, liqueur-filled chocolates, or anything else that may contain trace elements of alcohol.

As for kombucha sold in stores and at the supermarket, there is no physical way you could get yourself to a BAC of 0.05 with it.

Metta,
Paul. :)
Sorry to drag the thread off topic, but I had always taken the 0.00 limit for learners to mean under 0.01. So trace amounts would not be an issue. But I couldn't find an explanation on a cursory search..
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