Newbie Question about Vipassana Practice

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
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vsh22
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2022 3:36 pm

Newbie Question about Vipassana Practice

Post by vsh22 »

Hi,

I recently attended an S. N. Goenka 10-day Vipassana course. Unfortunately on day 4, someone showed symptoms of Covid and tested positive, so the course was shut down and we were sent home. We had just barely learned the basic technique of Vipassana and done one two-hour session. I'm planning on going back for a course during March, but in the meantime I still want to do 1-2 hours of meditation a day to build up my practice. I'm running into a small issue. During the course, my concentration had become so strong that I had no issue doing body scans, and whenever my mind wandered, I could pull it back within a few seconds. When I do Vipassana at home, my concentration has become so weak that I can't even get through one full body scan without my mind consistently wandering off for minutes. Would you recommend I still practice Vipassana as best as I can, or just do Anapana meditation to build up my concentration before I go back to the course?

Thanks.
maniture_85
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Apr 01, 2020 3:25 pm

Re: Newbie Question about Vipassana Practice

Post by maniture_85 »

I would reccomend Anapana if you feel you have to do Anapana.
Goenka itself suggested to come clear to a Vipassana Course without preceding experience in order to not take wrong ways, like playing the "game of sensations". I think it is true expecially doing Vipassana, when you go in depth with all body sensations by momentary concentration.
If you have doubts, go Anapana.
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Goofaholix
Posts: 3081
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:49 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Newbie Question about Vipassana Practice

Post by Goofaholix »

You could do anapana, or do anapana for the first half of the sitting and vipassana for the second half. If you had reached the end of the course you would see that both approaches are recommended for practicing at home.
“Peace is within oneself to be found in the same place as agitation and suffering. It is not found in a forest or on a hilltop, nor is it given by a teacher. Where you experience suffering, you can also find freedom from suffering. Trying to run away from suffering is actually to run toward it.” ― Ajahn Chah
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