Stand Against Suffering

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Jetavan
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Stand Against Suffering

Post by Jetavan »

Stand Against Suffering: An Unprecedented Call to Action by Buddhist Teachers

BY BHIKKHU BODHI, NORMAN FISCHER, JOAN HALIFAX, MUSHIM PATRICIA IKEDA, JACK KORNFIELD, ETHAN NICHTERN, ROSHI PAT ENKYO O'HARA, LAMA ROD OWENS, GREG SNYDER, GINA SHARPE, REV. ANGEL KYODO WILLIAMS, JAN WILLIS AND MYOKEI CAINE-BARRETT| APRIL 3, 2017

Thirteen leading Buddhist teachers, joined by more than 100 additional signatories, call on Buddhists and all people of faith to take a stand against policies of the new administration that will create suffering for the most vulnerable in society.

Document

[We are living in interesting times.]
dharmacorps
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Re: Stand Against Suffering

Post by dharmacorps »

I picked up an issue of Lion's Roar a few days ago and was surprised how much of it was politics. I ended up putting it down feeling more stressed than when I had picked it up. The attachment of western Buddhists to politics (read: far left wing affiliated, excluding those who disagree) is severe and myopic.
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mikenz66
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Re: Stand Against Suffering

Post by mikenz66 »

The Buddha spoke out about wholesome and unwholesome behaviour, and about wholesome and unwholesome ways of running households and societies. While, as in other aspects of Dhamma interpretation and practice, different people may well have different opinions, it would seem odd to complain about modern Bhikkhus, Bhikkhunis, and lay people following his example.
“Householder, there are these five utilizations of wealth. What five?

(1) “Here, householder, with wealth acquired by energetic striving, amassed by the strength of his arms, earned by the sweat of his brow, righteous wealth righteously gained, the noble disciple makes himself happy and pleased and properly maintains himself in happiness; he makes his parents happy and pleased and properly maintains them in happiness; he makes his wife and children, his slaves, workers, and servants happy and pleased and properly maintains them in happiness. This is the first utilization of wealth.
...
https://suttacentral.net/en/an5.41
“Bhikkhus, even a wheel-turning monarch, a righteous king who rules by the Dhamma, does not turn the wheel without a king above him.”

When this was said, a certain bhikkhu said to the Blessed One: “But, Bhante, who is the king above a wheel-turning monarch, a righteous king who rules by the Dhamma?”

“It is the Dhamma, bhikkhu,” the Blessed One said. “Here, bhikkhu, a wheel-turning monarch, a righteous king who rules by the Dhamma, relying just on the Dhamma, honoring, respecting, and venerating the Dhamma, taking the Dhamma as his standard, banner, and authority, provides righteous protection, shelter, and guard for the people in his court. Again, a wheel-turning monarch, a righteous king who rules by the Dhamma, relying just on the Dhamma, honoring, respecting, and venerating the Dhamma, taking the Dhamma as his standard, banner, and authority, provides righteous protection, shelter, and guard for his khattiya vassals, his army, brahmins and householders, the people of town and countryside, ascetics and brahmins, and the animals and birds. Having provided such righteous protection, shelter, and guard for all these beings, that wheel-turning monarch, a righteous king who rules by the Dhamma, turns the wheel solely through the Dhamma, a wheel that cannot be turned back by any hostile human being.
https://suttacentral.net/en/an3.14/1-3
‘Thereupon the Brahman who was chaplain said to the king: “The king’s country, Sire, is harassed and harried. There are dacoits abroad who pillage the villages and townships, and who make the roads unsafe. Were the king, so long as that is so, to levy a fresh tax, verily his majesty would be acting wrongly. But perchance his majesty might think: ‘I’ll soon put a stop to these scoundrels’ game by degradation and banishment, and fines and bonds and death!’ But their licence cannot be satisfactorily put a stop to so. The remnant left unpunished would still go on harassing the realm. Now there is one method to adopt to put a thorough end to this disorder. Whosoever there be in the king’s realm who devote themselves to keeping cattle and the farm, to them let his majesty the king give food and seed-corn. Whosoever there be in the king’s realm who devote themselves to trade, to them let his majesty the king give capital. Whosoever there be in the king’s realm who devote themselves to government service, to them let his majesty the king give wages and food. Then those men, following each his own business, will no longer harass the realm; the king’s revenue will go up; the country will be quiet and at peace; and the populace, pleased one with another and happy, dancing their children in their arms, will dwell with open doors.”
https://suttacentral.net/en/dn5/14
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Re: Stand Against Suffering

Post by Anagarika »

I'm old enough to remember when the Republican Party in the US was a centrist party, of sorts. It held reasonable views, and embraced a traditional center-right perspective. It woudl have been easy for a practicing Buddhist to be a centrist or main street Republican, and still feel that one existed in the world mindful of a duty to the environment, to living beings, and to practice a measure of caring and compassion for others.

I feel that the reason that Buddhist magazines have so completely thrown themsleves into traditional "liberal" values is that concerns for equality, justice for all, environmental and planetary stewarship, and a measure of compassion and balance have seemingly left the GOP. I admire GOP politicians like Susan Collins, or sponsors of bills such as :
THE SAWTOOTH NATIONAL RECREATION AREA AND JERRY PEAK WILDERNESS ADDITIONS ACT (H.R. 1138), introduced by Main Street’s Rep. Mike Simpson (ID)

This measure protects about 300,000 acres in three different tracts in the rugged Boulder-White Clouds mountain region of Idaho by designating them as wilderness areas. The Christian Science Monitor hailed its passage as an exemplar of “how Congress is supposed to work” and “how our democracy is supposed to function.”
Understanding and following Dhamma/Dharma, keeping precepts and actign with compassion and wisdom are not just "liberal" values. It's helpful that a discussion is beign raised on this issue, as polarizing people based on political parties, akin to practicing racism, is shortsighted and misguided. Better to apply Dhammic/Dharmic priinciples to both parties and see which policians act to support justice, fairness, and equality. With enough pressure from wise and caring people on both sides of the aisle, the extremist views and actions in both parties can be mitigated, and maybe Trump will learn that to be successful, despite his obvious deficits, he needs to listen to both sides of the conversation. Buddhists from both parties can wisely guide this conversation.
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Check this thread from Suttacentral

Post by stcstc »

It's about B.Bodhi new propaganda article. Suprised to see so strong reactions against it including from a monk: https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/st ... rs/4826/10

And check this post by Vstakan (russian legal immigrant to germany)
Define the most vulnerable. Are the illegal migrants the most vulnerable within a society? I would argue they aren't. Are the refugees the miost vulnerable in a society? Sounds plausible, right? Now, the refugees here in Germany ahve accommodation - even though pretty frequently it is sub-standard - they receive money from the German state to pay for their food, medical care, and other basic expenses, they enjoy immense support of the population and have every opportunity to learn the language and try and find the job that can sustain them financially. The German foreigners office is so lax in handling the refugees and wanna-be refugees that Anis Amri, the Berlin terrorist attacker, could enter the country with a fake pass while the German authorities knew about it, and he was able to get a stay permit and live for close to two years in Germany without being controlled by the state. I know about people from Kosovo and other nations who shred and burn their pass as soon as they illegally come to Germany, because it is a real pain in the neck to prove they are really from Kosovo. I know Syrians complaining about the lack of control of refugees by the German state, because they obviously don't even cotrol whether a 'Syrian refugee' speak the Syrian dialect of Arabic or even knows what the capital of Syria is.

I live in a 10 square-metre large room and have to pay 230 euros for it very month. I have to pay for my medical insurance 90 euros per month, 300 euros are paid to my university ever six months. I am paid 670 euros per month and I cannot find a better job because I am legally forbidden from doing so - as soon as I work more than 120 days per year my visa is automatically void. I have a college degree, I speak German on the C2 level, I am willing to integrate into the German society and I am in fact more or less successfully integrated into it, and yet my standards of living are lower than those of very many refugees. I know lots of other people who are living just like me. The illegal migrants and other minorities are not the most vulnerable group in the modern Western world - at the very least not here in Europe. It is the legal migrants. We are discriminated by the state and society, because there is no other name for the fact that we are deliberately put in worse conditions than the illegal folks or honest to God refugees - we cannot have the full benefits of being the citizens of the Western countries, and we have to comply with the horrible bureaucratic non-sense that often makes our lives nigh unbearable. Who protects us? No-one. Because it is fair we obey the laws of the country. It is fair other people who don't want to obey the laws of the country are not allowed to enter it. It is fair that we are all equal before the Law.
stcstc
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Check this thread from Suttacentral

Post by stcstc »

It's about B.Bodhi new propaganda article. Suprised to see so strong reactions against it including from a monk: https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/st ... rs/4826/10

And check this post by Vstakan (russian legal immigrant to germany)
Define the most vulnerable. Are the illegal migrants the most vulnerable within a society? I would argue they aren't. Are the refugees the miost vulnerable in a society? Sounds plausible, right? Now, the refugees here in Germany ahve accommodation - even though pretty frequently it is sub-standard - they receive money from the German state to pay for their food, medical care, and other basic expenses, they enjoy immense support of the population and have every opportunity to learn the language and try and find the job that can sustain them financially. The German foreigners office is so lax in handling the refugees and wanna-be refugees that Anis Amri, the Berlin terrorist attacker, could enter the country with a fake pass while the German authorities knew about it, and he was able to get a stay permit and live for close to two years in Germany without being controlled by the state. I know about people from Kosovo and other nations who shred and burn their pass as soon as they illegally come to Germany, because it is a real pain in the neck to prove they are really from Kosovo. I know Syrians complaining about the lack of control of refugees by the German state, because they obviously don't even cotrol whether a 'Syrian refugee' speak the Syrian dialect of Arabic or even knows what the capital of Syria is.

I live in a 10 square-metre large room and have to pay 230 euros for it very month. I have to pay for my medical insurance 90 euros per month, 300 euros are paid to my university ever six months. I am paid 670 euros per month and I cannot find a better job because I am legally forbidden from doing so - as soon as I work more than 120 days per year my visa is automatically void. I have a college degree, I speak German on the C2 level, I am willing to integrate into the German society and I am in fact more or less successfully integrated into it, and yet my standards of living are lower than those of very many refugees. I know lots of other people who are living just like me. The illegal migrants and other minorities are not the most vulnerable group in the modern Western world - at the very least not here in Europe. It is the legal migrants. We are discriminated by the state and society, because there is no other name for the fact that we are deliberately put in worse conditions than the illegal folks or honest to God refugees - we cannot have the full benefits of being the citizens of the Western countries, and we have to comply with the horrible bureaucratic non-sense that often makes our lives nigh unbearable. Who protects us? No-one. Because it is fair we obey the laws of the country. It is fair other people who don't want to obey the laws of the country are not allowed to enter it. It is fair that we are all equal before the Law.
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Re: Check this thread from Suttacentral

Post by mikenz66 »

I'm not clear what your point is. Are you against people expressing their opinions about how societies should be run, based on their experience with the Dhamma, or do you simply hold different political opinions from the signatories?

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Mike
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Re: Check this thread from Suttacentral

Post by R1111 = rightviewftw »

Article starts with naming 13 Leading Buddhist teachers, i think this is wrong, they are not even in the top 100 probably. These are lay people mostly and i dont think Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi teaches meditation or meditates much from what i heard. Had they not included Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi in the list the claim would have been utterly rediculous. So far ive tried to read the article a couple times but repeatedly couldnt get past this.

I think its clear that most effective way to help the world is to become a Buddha, other than this is to become an Arahant and teach.
The dharma is not an excuse to turn away from the suffering of the world, nor is it a sedative to get us comfortably through painful times. It is a powerful teaching that frees and strengthens us to work diligently for the liberation of beings from suffering.
What does it mean to be Kwan Yin in the modern world? What does it mean to be a bodhisattva-citizen, someone who is willing to engage with society to help protect and awaken others?
What is this seriously, sounds like Mahayana doctrine to me. I think Theravada Buddhists should focus on meditation while there is still life in this body and definitely not get involved in politics especially for monks.
..."Just now, lord, after the meal, on returning from our alms round, we gathered at the meeting hall and got engaged in many kinds of bestial topics of conversation: conversation about kings, robbers, & ministers of state; ..."

"It isn't right, monks, that sons of good families, on having gone forth out of faith from home to the homeless life, should get engaged in such topics of conversation, i.e., conversation about kings, robbers, & ministers of state... talk of whether things exist or not...
I think its inappropriate article and arguably a misrepresentation of what is the Dhamma, im not thrilled about supposed Theravada Teachers promoting Bodhisattva Ideal as something all Buddhists of the world should strive for.

Language in the article is also highly emotionally charged while message is ambiguous and non specific, there is no solution offered and nobody has a plan it seems. What is clear is that 13 Buddhist teachers have pointed out Trumps administration as Evil, policies evil and disgusting, him basicly a nasty Predator and we now should protect the minorities against this Animosity, it's a Call to Arms obv. I dont know if i can go as far as calling it typical leftists propaganda but it sure has some similarities.
Last edited by R1111 = rightviewftw on Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Check this thread from Suttacentral

Post by perkele »

Thank you for pointing out this discussion on SuttaCentral. Good to see that there are some intelligent people over there who voice their opinions clearly, and even monastics who see and make it clear that such kind of political partisanship (if one could even call it that; they really don't make any concrete statement of what they "stand for" or "stand against" - okay "suffering", we stand against that, we are heroes... okay :thinking:) is unbecoming of a monk.
mikenz66 wrote:Can you point to something in the Vinaya where it is forbidden for Bhikkhus to teach lay people about wholesome and unwholesome actions?
This question of yours is hilarious in the context where it is posed (the context of this heroic "stand against suffering"). That whole text is so utterly void of substance and full of meaningless buzzwords, I cannot see the tiniest wholesome element in it.

And that all underlined with this fake buddha quote from an intentional mistranslation of the Maha-parinibbana sutta (Sadhu to Bhikkhu Jayasara and DKervick for pointing out its origin and alterations):
As long as a society protects the vulnerable among them, they can be expected to prosper and not decline.

—The Buddha, in the Mahaparinirvana Sutta
, and signed by the great Pali expert and translator of the whole Sutta-pitaka, Bhikkhu Bodhi. Quite sure he must have been aware of this error, and yet still gives his support to this nonsense (focussing on this mistranslation may seem pedantic, but really, in my opinion it is inexcusable for a knowleadgable Pali translator of Bhikkhu Bodhi's stature to turn a blind eye on it, not to speak of the support for this self-indulging meaningless heroic banter of a "message" that this team of super-hero bodhisattvas are spreading, solely for promotion of their heroic self-image [seriously, I cannot see any other motive behind this than advertisement: What else is the point? - None to be seen from here.]).

What a disgrace!

If they at least had a real message, some explicit and definite criticism "against policies of the new administration" - and I have no doubt there is a lot to criticize or condemn - there could be something good to it. But as it stand this "stand against suffering" is just an embarrassment.

And damn straight sure It would be good if "monks" who participate in such "activism" (really, "active" about what? that is another question) taught laypeople about wholesome and unwholesome actions instead, humble, self-effacing and withdrawing from the world and the eight worldly conditions.
Srsly... :computerproblem:

Maiev is making very good points from a good compassionate motive:
Maiev wrote:It should not be understood that I am judging B.Bodhi to be a bad monk because of his habbit. On the contrary, I consider him one of the few truly knowledgeable monks, well versed in the suttas. And he has a good and modest character. It is precisely because of this that I have always been critical of his political addiction. You can number on the fingers of a single hand the monks of the caliber of B.Bodhi that exist. And this habit left untreated is ruining his credibility to many people. As I've said, there were a couple of times where I tried to bring B.Bodhi into an argument and the person dismissed him from the start cause of his political habit. People are always fast to devalue another person based on a small character flaw that they have, especially if it's an annoying one like politics that instantly antagonizes a big part of buddhist towards him.

There is a section in the vinaya dealing with the benefits of following the rules. One of the benefits was preserving respect to the shanga, not making it open to criticism from the outside world.

Becoming a monk is much more difficult that people realize. A person who becomes a monk has renounced woman, money, sea side vacations, family etc. He has renounced the strongest attachments that one can renounce. Let him not ruin his credibility with this last attachment to politics that is to be renounced. What he renounced before was much more difficult to renounce than this last little attachment.
It would be really good (but somehow my hopes are quite low) if Bhikkhu Bodhi could become aware and listen to arguments like this, just as there were monks in the Buddha's time who were brought to the senses by benevolent devas.

(This and this thread should be merged, because duplicate, and probably with this because it's on the same topic.)
Last edited by perkele on Wed Apr 05, 2017 2:15 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Check this thread from Suttacentral

Post by mikenz66 »

perkele wrote:
mikenz66 wrote:Can you point to something in the Vinaya where it is forbidden for Bhikkhus to teach lay people about wholesome and unwholesome actions?
This question of yours is hilarious in the context where it is posed (the context of this heroic "stand against suffering"). That whole text is so utterly void of substance and full of meaningless buzzwords, I cannot see the tiniest wholesome element in it.
Thank you for you opinion. I respectfully disagree. The Buddha taught wholesome and unwholesomeness from the personal up to the Wheel Turning Monarch. https://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f ... 80#p421311 Perhaps it is possible to argue that Trump is such a wheel-turning monarch, and his actions are carefully designed to bring peace to the land/world. I personally doubt it, but some people here have quite different opinions from me on all sorts of matters...

Best Wishes
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Re: Stand Against Suffering

Post by mikenz66 »

Various threads about this letter have been merged.

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Re: Check this thread from Suttacentral

Post by perkele »

mikenz66 wrote:
perkele wrote:
mikenz66 wrote:Can you point to something in the Vinaya where it is forbidden for Bhikkhus to teach lay people about wholesome and unwholesome actions?
This question of yours is hilarious in the context where it is posed (the context of this heroic "stand against suffering"). That whole text is so utterly void of substance and full of meaningless buzzwords, I cannot see the tiniest wholesome element in it.
Thank you for you opinion. I respectfully disagree. The Buddha taught wholesome and unwholesomeness from the personal up to the Wheel Turning Monarch. https://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f ... 12#p421311
Thank you for pointing out these suttas. (Note that the link has changed now due to the merging of topics.) In fact I was just about to write that when I came home and logged in here, having seen earlier that you had quoted them, and now wanting to reply to it - because I found it sad that, already for a longer time, the impression seemed to gain prominence here (or could easily come up from the curt replies on such matters) that the Buddha had not given any advice on wholesome social action, governance and harmonious living in worldly communities, and I had been searching for sutta quotes like these (which I knew I had read at some point) recently for quite a long time. So I was very delighted when I saw them quoted here.
But then there came this and I had to say first just how stupid I find this whole "stance against suffering", which has no actual message and teaching about wholesome and unwholesome actions at all behind it. (Have you actually read it? And if yes, do you really see any substantial message in there?)

I think that suttas like those you pointed to receive too little prominence in places like this one. I assume that they find their well-deserved place and attention in Bhikkhu Bodhi's book about "social and communal harmony", and I look forward to its upcoming or ongoing discussion and analysis in the Study group, and I think it would be not even bad among laypeople here to draw connections and get engaged in possibly heated debate over current events and goings-on in the world with reference to these. So I hope very much you will keep up a good spirit about this commendable topic, and that people will engage with interest and draw helpful insights from it. (It is sad that Bhikkhu Bodhi's commentary is not "free" and cannot be shared here without copyright infringement. That is another point which I find disagreeable about his demeanour as a monstic - that he is "married" to a book selling company, instead of sharing the Dhamma freely, for which I believe there would be certainly enough avenues and possible support - so many places that already exist on the internet [like this forum, just as an example] that would provide an open platform for that... and laypeople could print books and distribute them and do some Dhamma dana in that way... that's all possible, and no necessity to be married to commerce... but that is now a too far digression... ])

I just find this vain and utterly meaningless "stance against suffering", "against policies of the new administration", with no further specification, and no actual substantial point being brought across, to be an embarrassment, and a disgrace especially for a monk to put his signature beneath it. (And if there were any actual substantial criticism in it, that could be valuable, and if it were done by laypeople alone, and clearly divorced from any "buddhist" gang-up identification and association especially with the monasic sangha - which should be ultimately a-political [the Buddha's advice, as pointed to in the suttas above, especially is also not to be seen as political engagement in any way; it was always very neutral and detached advice from a disengaged and dispassionate position. People, especially monks, should not misrepresent that.])

(You may also want to read my previous message again, as I was still editing it two or three times, adding some remarks and sentences, while you were already replying (or had already done so), especially my point about this criticism being really needed and obviously well-intended, and a thing that my opinion a monk like Bhikkhu Bodhi should take to heart.)
mikenz66 wrote:Perhaps it is possible to argue that Trump is such a wheel-turning monarch, and his actions are carefully designed to bring peace to the land/world. I personally doubt it, but some people here have quite different opinions from me on all sorts of matters...

Best Wishes
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Mike
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Re: Stand Against Suffering

Post by mikenz66 »

Thanks for the well-reasoned email perkele.

Indeed, I do hope that people might engage with suttas such as the ones I quoted above (which I did get from Bhikkhu Bodhi's book - it's a brilliant resource, and I, too, am disappointed that Wisdom hasn't posted the material the same way as as they have In The Buddha's Words.). My reply to you was probably tinged with exasperation with the idea some keep pushing that monastics have no business giving advice. Since I come to the Dhamma from an interaction with a monastic community where giving advice to lay people is a key part of their mission, I have no sympathy for that attitude. Furthermore, this forum is full of political arguments where there appears to be no attempt to make any Dhammic connection. Not that I have any objection to people discussing politics, but I'm not sure what the point is of discussing it here unless the tagline is taken seriously:
The best place for the discussion of current events and politics. A place to bring a contemplative / Dharmic perspective and opinions to current events and politics.

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Re: Stand Against Suffering

Post by retrofuturist »

Greetings Mike,
mikenz66 wrote:Not that I have any objection to people discussing politics, but I'm not sure what the point is of discussing it here unless the tagline is taken seriously:
The best place for the discussion of current events and politics. A place to bring a contemplative / Dharmic perspective and opinions to current events and politics.
Maybe that's just because you don't understand how people's views on such matters are influenced by the Dhamma?

For example, the near moral absolutism of the Dhamma stands in sharp contrast to the moral relativism of "progressive" politics - the leftist ideological world-view upon which this letter was written. In addressing that disconnect, I have sided with the Dhamma, and that near moral absolutism (in the sense of the intrinsic quality of cetanas underpinning action) has now influenced how I see worldly matters too. Therefore political appeals to emotions which are rooted in people's aversion...
We hear the cries of a nation whose democracy and social fabric are at risk. We join in solidarity with many others who are also hearing these cries, knowing that together we can be a remarkable force for transformation and liberation.

:cry: :cry: :cry:
... are simply matters where those people would be better served applying the Dhamma in order to emotionally regulate that which is rooted in aversion. Insights in the Dhamma mean that I don't buy into the drama, especially when that drama is so bereft of substance and (as perkele pointed out) cannot point to even a single policy which will objectively inflict suffering.
Phena Sutta wrote:"Now suppose that in the autumn — when it's raining in fat, heavy drops — a water bubble were to appear & disappear on the water, and a man with good eyesight were to see it, observe it, & appropriately examine it. To him — seeing it, observing it, & appropriately examining it — it would appear empty, void, without substance: for what substance would there be in a water bubble? In the same way, a monk sees, observes, & appropriately examines any feeling that is past, future, or present; internal or external; blatant or subtle; common or sublime; far or near. To him — seeing it, observing it, & appropriately examining it — it would appear empty, void, without substance: for what substance would there be in feeling?
The best way to take a stand against suffering is to become an arahant - not to whip up and pander to the hurt feelings and cries of people who cannot even regulate their emotions.

Many of the commentators on Sutta Central are totally spot on... it's good that such observations can be made in this day and age without people being falsely accused of character assassination and threatened with recriminations by those who are intolerant of diversity in thought.

:thumbsup:

Metta,
Paul. :)
"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"It is natural that one who knows and sees things as they really are is disenchanted and dispassionate." (AN 10.2)

"Overcome the liar by truth." (Dhp 223)
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Re: Stand Against Suffering

Post by pink_trike »

mikenz66 wrote:The Buddha spoke out about wholesome and unwholesome behaviour, and about wholesome and unwholesome ways of running households and societies. While, as in other aspects of Dhamma interpretation and practice, different people may well have different opinions, it would seem odd to complain about modern Bhikkhus, Bhikkhunis, and lay people following his example.
Exactly. It's that simple. Well said.
Vision is Mind
Mind is Empty
Emptiness is Clear Light
Clear Light is Union
Union is Great Bliss

- Dawa Gyaltsen

---

Disclaimer: I'm a non-religious practitioner of Theravada, Mahayana/Vajrayana, and Tibetan Bon Dzogchen mind-training.
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