Sense restraint

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LukeS
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Sense restraint

Post by LukeS »

Hello,
I have recently discovered that the Buddha was right about sensual pleasures. They are harmful. I was wondering if anyone has any tips on practicing sense restraint? How should I avoid watching television? How do I stay in one room all day? Thank you for listening.
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confusedlayman
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by confusedlayman »

LukeS wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 6:39 pm Hello,
I have recently discovered that the Buddha was right about sensual pleasures. They are harmful. I was wondering if anyone has any tips on practicing sense restraint? How should I avoid watching television? How do I stay in one room all day? Thank you for listening.
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Ryan95227
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by Ryan95227 »

LukeS wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 6:39 pm Hello,
I have recently discovered that the Buddha was right about sensual pleasures. They are harmful. I was wondering if anyone has any tips on practicing sense restraint? How should I avoid watching television? How do I stay in one room all day? Thank you for listening.
i tried everything. The only effective way for me was to be mindful of the activities in my brain and reason out why I'm consumed with such useless activities
sunnat
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by sunnat »

Is it possible to turn the tv off and give it away to someone, or throw it away?
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Bundokji
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by Bundokji »

Sense restraint can have different meanings depending on the context. If you are interested in quieting the mind and developing concentration, sense constraint would be gradually replacing the habit of watching TV or seeking excitement (avoidance of boredom) and replacing it with the habit of focusing on a meditation object that is not as excitable to the mind and conducive to quietude.

In the context of the relationship between sense constrain and knowledge/insight, had your knowledge of the harms associated with sensual pleasure been genuine and stable, then sense restraint would be a second nature without even trying.

You can make a distinction between the activities of the senses and seeking pleasure. Seeking pleasure is associated with certain defilements such as greed, aversion and delusion, while the experience of pleasure itself is a purely physical phenomena. There is nothing intrinsically harmful in experiencing pleasure.
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.
santa100
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by santa100 »

LukeS wrote:How should I avoid watching television? How do I stay in one room all day?
Find other more wholesome alternatives to watch, like reading books and suttas. Also do not stay inside all day. It's very bad for your health. Spend some time outdoor and do some cardios like jogging, biking, hiking, etc. Even the professional monks don't do sitting meditation all day. They split their time between sitting meditation and walking meditation outdoor.
kalyana.mitta
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by kalyana.mitta »

You could try and observe higher precepts(like 8 precepts or 10 precepts).

It really helps since you have to avoid sensual pleasures as much as possible and live the day imitating great arahants.

Also, some of the precepts specifically restrain you from enjoying sensual pleasures or forms of enjoyment that you would in your day to day life(like eating whenever you want, watching tv or entertainment. etc.)

It might be difficult at first so try observing higher precepts for once a week and gradually build up from that. Observing the 8 precepts not just helps to distance yourself from sensual pleasures but also a chance to practice the dhamma and experience the peace that monks and nuns have every day.

Especially now, there is probably more free time or at least the chance to stay at home, which gives a rare opportunity to practice the dhamma more and follow higher precepts without being distracted by the typical busyness of the lay life.

Here is a link for the full 8 precpets and an explanation of it: https://mahamevnawa.lk/en/eight-precepts/
and also the 10 precepts: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dha ... asila.html

Good Luck :D
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Laurens
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by Laurens »

LukeS wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 6:39 pm Hello,
I have recently discovered that the Buddha was right about sensual pleasures. They are harmful. I was wondering if anyone has any tips on practicing sense restraint? How should I avoid watching television? How do I stay in one room all day? Thank you for listening.
Generally when we have addictions, we aren't ready to give them up until the drawbacks become obvious, or outweigh the forces that draw us towards the source of our addiction.

Addicts will talk about hitting a point of rock bottom, where the drawbacks of their behaviour become crystal clear and they know they have to stop. Watching television is not quite the same thing as a drug problem, so most people don't reach a rock bottom point with it. So what we need to do is contemplate the drawbacks. See the problems with it.

Contemplate the drawbacks to sensual indulgence, and contemplate the benefits of wholesome activities and I think you will naturally move from one to the other. You will be unlikely to have any luck forcing yourself to stop something that you don't see the drawbacks of. And there will be a point at which you're somewhere in the middle, occasionally letting go of sensual pleasures, and occasionally indulging them. This is fine and shouldn't become a burden of guilt. The enterprise of letting go of sensual pleasure is not a moral imperative, you don't have to do it. You should do it because you see the drawbacks and thus want to do it.
"If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?"

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
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rhinoceroshorn
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by rhinoceroshorn »

Laurens wrote: Fri May 08, 2020 3:44 pm
LukeS wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 6:39 pm Hello,
I have recently discovered that the Buddha was right about sensual pleasures. They are harmful. I was wondering if anyone has any tips on practicing sense restraint? How should I avoid watching television? How do I stay in one room all day? Thank you for listening.
Generally when we have addictions, we aren't ready to give them up until the drawbacks become obvious, or outweigh the forces that draw us towards the source of our addiction.

Addicts will talk about hitting a point of rock bottom, where the drawbacks of their behaviour become crystal clear and they know they have to stop. Watching television is not quite the same thing as a drug problem, so most people don't reach a rock bottom point with it. So what we need to do is contemplate the drawbacks. See the problems with it.

Contemplate the drawbacks to sensual indulgence, and contemplate the benefits of wholesome activities and I think you will naturally move from one to the other. You will be unlikely to have any luck forcing yourself to stop something that you don't see the drawbacks of. And there will be a point at which you're somewhere in the middle, occasionally letting go of sensual pleasures, and occasionally indulging them. This is fine and shouldn't become a burden of guilt. The enterprise of letting go of sensual pleasure is not a moral imperative, you don't have to do it. You should do it because you see the drawbacks and thus want to do it.
Marvelous posts.
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enduring troubles with no dismay,
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But if they hit you with a stick...?"
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331crz
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by 331crz »

This is from Sabbasava sutta (Meaning of sabbasava sutta being the discorse of all the defilements)- correct me if im wrong.
you can read the full discourse in here - https://accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn ... .than.html

"[7] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by developing? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, develops mindfulness as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. He develops analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening... persistence as a factor for Awakening... rapture as a factor for Awakening... serenity as a factor for Awakening... concentration as a factor for Awakening... equanimity as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to develop these qualities do not arise for him when he develops them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by developing.

"When a monk's fermentations that should be abandoned by seeing have been abandoned by seeing,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by restraining have been abandoned by restraining,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by using have been abandoned by using,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by tolerating have been abandoned by tolerating,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by avoiding have been abandoned by avoiding,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by dispelling have been abandoned by dispelling,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by developing have been abandoned by developing, then he is called a monk who dwells restrained with the restraint of all the fermentations. He has severed craving, thrown off the fetters, and — through the right penetration of conceit — has made an end of suffering & stress."

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One's words.
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confusedlayman
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by confusedlayman »

331crz wrote: Sun May 31, 2020 3:35 am This is from Sabbasava sutta (Meaning of sabbasava sutta being the discorse of all the defilements)- correct me if im wrong.
you can read the full discourse in here - https://accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn ... .than.html

"[7] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by developing? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, develops mindfulness as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. He develops analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening... persistence as a factor for Awakening... rapture as a factor for Awakening... serenity as a factor for Awakening... concentration as a factor for Awakening... equanimity as a factor for Awakening dependent on seclusion... dispassion... cessation, resulting in letting go. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to develop these qualities do not arise for him when he develops them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by developing.

"When a monk's fermentations that should be abandoned by seeing have been abandoned by seeing,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by restraining have been abandoned by restraining,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by using have been abandoned by using,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by tolerating have been abandoned by tolerating,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by avoiding have been abandoned by avoiding,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by dispelling have been abandoned by dispelling,
his fermentations that should be abandoned by developing have been abandoned by developing, then he is called a monk who dwells restrained with the restraint of all the fermentations. He has severed craving, thrown off the fetters, and — through the right penetration of conceit — has made an end of suffering & stress."

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One's words.
thats suttta was eye opener. thanks for sharing.
dont think
bodhifollower
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by bodhifollower »

To practice sense restraint it's good to read the sutta about sense restraint. To sum up just be aware of the object you are seeing for instance and don't get caught up it's details, see it as just an image of sight, nothing to grasp or get from it. This is especially true for tv as you can't get any of of the images on the screen, it is all colors.

As well focus on other activities to occupy your mind. Unless you are Awakened you will have craving, so try to channel your desire into a positive direction. There is a difference between wholesome and unwholesome desire. If you enjoy what you are doing then it's called chanda, if it's painful it's called lobha. So try to change all your lobha to chanda. Only do what makes you feel light and happy.
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confusedlayman
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by confusedlayman »

bodhifollower wrote: Sun Jun 07, 2020 12:54 am To practice sense restraint it's good to read the sutta about sense restraint. To sum up just be aware of the object you are seeing for instance and don't get caught up it's details, see it as just an image of sight, nothing to grasp or get from it. This is especially true for tv as you can't get any of of the images on the screen, it is all colors.

As well focus on other activities to occupy your mind. Unless you are Awakened you will have craving, so try to channel your desire into a positive direction. There is a difference between wholesome and unwholesome desire. If you enjoy what you are doing then it's called chanda, if it's painful it's called lobha. So try to change all your lobha to chanda. Only do what makes you feel light and happy.
sometimes stroking makes me happy is it chanda?
dont think
bodhifollower
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by bodhifollower »

confusedlayman wrote: Sun Jun 07, 2020 4:42 pm
bodhifollower wrote: Sun Jun 07, 2020 12:54 am To practice sense restraint it's good to read the sutta about sense restraint. To sum up just be aware of the object you are seeing for instance and don't get caught up it's details, see it as just an image of sight, nothing to grasp or get from it. This is especially true for tv as you can't get any of of the images on the screen, it is all colors.

As well focus on other activities to occupy your mind. Unless you are Awakened you will have craving, so try to channel your desire into a positive direction. There is a difference between wholesome and unwholesome desire. If you enjoy what you are doing then it's called chanda, if it's painful it's called lobha. So try to change all your lobha to chanda. Only do what makes you feel light and happy.
sometimes stroking makes me happy is it chanda?
Please don't say stroking here. If it's not all the time, then it's not worth pursuing. You really want to look to see if it does make you happy. This kind of activity can lead to lack of awareness. The opposite is awareness, if you're aware you won't have sexual desire. It's like someone with leprosy scratching open their wounds and then burning them shut, they feel some pleasure in this. But this doesn't cure leprosy.
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confusedlayman
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Re: Sense restraint

Post by confusedlayman »

bodhifollower wrote: Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:20 pm
confusedlayman wrote: Sun Jun 07, 2020 4:42 pm
bodhifollower wrote: Sun Jun 07, 2020 12:54 am To practice sense restraint it's good to read the sutta about sense restraint. To sum up just be aware of the object you are seeing for instance and don't get caught up it's details, see it as just an image of sight, nothing to grasp or get from it. This is especially true for tv as you can't get any of of the images on the screen, it is all colors.

As well focus on other activities to occupy your mind. Unless you are Awakened you will have craving, so try to channel your desire into a positive direction. There is a difference between wholesome and unwholesome desire. If you enjoy what you are doing then it's called chanda, if it's painful it's called lobha. So try to change all your lobha to chanda. Only do what makes you feel light and happy.
sometimes stroking makes me happy is it chanda?
Please don't say stroking here. If it's not all the time, then it's not worth pursuing. You really want to look to see if it does make you happy. This kind of activity can lead to lack of awareness. The opposite is awareness, if you're aware you won't have sexual desire. It's like someone with leprosy scratching open their wounds and then burning them shut, they feel some pleasure in this. But this doesn't cure leprosy.
Yes true
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