origin and meaning of this symbol

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths - what can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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salayatananirodha
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origin and meaning of this symbol

Post by salayatananirodha »

this is said to mean love and kindness and protection, but where does it come from, and how did it come to mean these things
122607444_2827698977465337_2743746008036301072_n.jpg
122607444_2827698977465337_2743746008036301072_n.jpg (3.92 KiB) Viewed 3190 times
16. 'In what has the world originated?' — so said the Yakkha Hemavata, — 'with what is the world intimate? by what is the world afflicted, after having grasped at what?' (167)

17. 'In six the world has originated, O Hemavata,' — so said Bhagavat, — 'with six it is intimate, by six the world is afflicted, after having grasped at six.' (168)

- Hemavatasutta


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http://buddhadust.net/backmatter/indexe ... ta_toc.htm
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Coëmgenu
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Re: origin and meaning of this symbol

Post by Coëmgenu »

It looks like an "om" with a candrabindu, but I don't recognize the script.
Then, the monks sang this gāthā:

These bodies are like foam.
Them being frail, who can rejoice in them?
The Buddha attained the vajra-body.
Still, it becomes inconstant and rots.
The many Buddhas are vajra-entities.
All are also subject to inconstancy.
Quickly ended, like melting snow --
how could things be different?

The Buddha passed into parinirvāṇa afterward.

(T1.27b10 Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra DĀ 2)
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Coëmgenu
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Re: origin and meaning of this symbol

Post by Coëmgenu »

The general shape is giving me Southeast Asian vibes, like this Thai "Om."
220px-Khmer_Sacred_Symbol,_Om_or_Unalom.png
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Then, the monks sang this gāthā:

These bodies are like foam.
Them being frail, who can rejoice in them?
The Buddha attained the vajra-body.
Still, it becomes inconstant and rots.
The many Buddhas are vajra-entities.
All are also subject to inconstancy.
Quickly ended, like melting snow --
how could things be different?

The Buddha passed into parinirvāṇa afterward.

(T1.27b10 Mahāparinirvāṇasūtra DĀ 2)
chownah
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Re: origin and meaning of this symbol

Post by chownah »

salayatananirodha wrote: Sun Oct 25, 2020 1:35 am this is said to mean love and kindness and protection, but where does it come from, and how did it come to mean these things
122607444_2827698977465337_2743746008036301072_n.jpg
Where did you find it?
chownah
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Dhammanando
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Re: origin and meaning of this symbol

Post by Dhammanando »

salayatananirodha wrote: Sun Oct 25, 2020 1:35 am this is said to mean love and kindness and protection, but where does it come from, and how did it come to mean these things
You could try asking the chairman of the Samatha Trust, Dr. Paul Dennison, who's a great enthusiast for Khmer and Thai yantras, mantras, tattoos, etc.

napaul(at)tiscali(dot)co(dot)uk
Anabhirati kho, āvuso, imasmiṃ dhammavinaye dukkhā, abhirati sukhā.

“To not delight in this dhammavinaya, friend, is painful; to delight in it is bliss.”
(Sukhasutta, AN 10:66)
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