No See Evil Buddha

Pictures of revered teachers, places, rupas, temples, bhikkhus, shrine rooms etc. that bring inspiration to our members. Pilgrimage advice, devotion etc.
Sylvester
Posts: 2204
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2009 9:57 am

Re: No See Evil Buddha

Post by Sylvester »

From what I can gather from the mangled sales-pitch, the Thai "sammabart" is a corruption of "sammapatti" (attainment). Specifically, the idea that a consecrator would have been on a long retreat in a "sammabart" (making a gift to such a monk highly meritorious) leads me to think that the salesman was thinking of Nirodha Sammapatti.

PS - the Thai predilection for equating Phra Pidta with Sangkachai (Sangkachai = Sang + Kaccayana, where "Sang" is a Skt honorific used commonly in SEAsia meaning "the Venerable") doesn't really have a firm ground. Besides which, if the Thais knew their Sarvastivadin Avadanas, they'll realise that the Ven Kaccayana did not uglify himself on account of the ladies - he did it to avoid another homoerotic episode such as Sorreya's lust for his golden skin.
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Ontheway
Posts: 2126
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2021 3:35 pm

Re: No See Evil Buddha

Post by Ontheway »

1517819982_4a5bd5c66512e76afbb0c88509974272.jpg
Classical Phra Pidta year 254X, from Wat Pako, Songkhla. I got one piece of this small statue.

Phra Pidta (พระปิดตา), fat and big belly, with both hands on face, usually identified as Arahant Mahakaccayana Thera.
lf any teach Nirvāna is to cease,
Say unto such they lie.
If any teach Nirvāna is to live,
Say unto such they err.


- Sir Edwin Arnold
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Ontheway
Posts: 2126
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2021 3:35 pm

Re: No See Evil Buddha

Post by Ontheway »

1445836975.jpg
Thai southern part Phra Pidta image with golden hued body

142794399_3712755665505558_4067021444689728855_n.jpg
Traditional Phra Pidta image (Malaysia style)

IMG_20190208_115918.jpg
Traditional Phra Pidta image (Thailand style)


It is reasonable to think that this image is referring to Arahant Maha Kaccayana Thera. The image was created by Buddhists in the past as token of remembrance for Dhamma teaching of guarding sense faculties (hence covering the face), which is what Arahant Mahakaccayana Thera always do.
On this occasion Sakka, along with his celestial retinue, drew near to the holy assembly and prostrated himself before the Blessed One.

Since he did not see Mahākaccāna, he thought to himself: “It would be good indeed if the noble elder would arrive.” Just at that moment Kaccāna approached and took his seat. When Sakka beheld him, he grasped him firmly by the ankles, expressed his joy over the elder’s arrival, and honoured him with gifts of scents and flowers. Some of the younger monks were upset and complained that Sakka was being partial in his display of reverence, but the Buddha reproved them with the words: “Monks, those monks who, like my son Mahākaccāna, guard the doors of the senses are beloved both among devas and humans.”

He then pronounced the following stanza of the Dhammapada:

Even the devas hold him dear, Whose senses are subdued Like horses trained well by a charioteer, Whose pride is destroyed, And who is free from corruptions. (Dhp 94)

That Kaccāna was actually one who devoted close attention to the mastery of the sense faculties is borne out by his discourses, which (as we shall see below) often emphasize the need for guarding “the doors of the senses.”
- Great Disciples of the Buddha by Venerable Nyanaponika Thera and Hellmuth Hecker
lf any teach Nirvāna is to cease,
Say unto such they lie.
If any teach Nirvāna is to live,
Say unto such they err.


- Sir Edwin Arnold
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