What is the Nature of Buddhas?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Tennyson
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What is the Nature of Buddhas?

Post by Tennyson »

Bhikkhu Bodhi writes that "the Buddha Gotama is not merely one unique individual who puts in an unprecedented appearance on the stage of human history and then bows out forever. He is, rather, the fulfillment of a primordial archetype, the most recent member of a cosmic 'dynasty' of Buddhas constituted by numberless Perfectly Enlightened Ones of the past and sustained by Perfectly Enlightened Ones continuing on indefinitely into the future." (In the Buddha's Words, pg. 44)

This idea of an archetype and a continuum of Buddhas caught my attention. In the context of Theravada practice and teachings, what is the nature of a Buddha? How many Buddhas are there in this world according to Theravada? Is Shakyamuni Buddha the only one, or do there exist other Buddhas who are venerated and talked about as leading beings to enlightenment on other worlds? What are they like? Do they differ in terms of their appearance on this earth, or are they all uniform in characteristics and appearance?

In short terms, what's a Buddha like, exactly?
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cappuccino
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Re: What is the Nature of Buddhas?

Post by cappuccino »

the Blessed One wrote:One who sees the Dhamma sees me … For in seeing the Dhamma, Vakkali, one sees me; and in seeing me, one sees the Dhamma.
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Ontheway
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Re: What is the Nature of Buddhas?

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In short terms, what's a Buddha like, exactly?
Itipi so bhagavā arahaṁ sammāsambuddho vijjācaraṇasampanno sugato lokavidū anuttaro purisadammasārathi satthā devamanussānaṁ buddho bhagavā.

The Blessed One is an arahant, perfectly enlightened, accomplished in true knowledge and conduct, well gone, knower of the world, unsurpassed leader of persons to be tamed, teacher of gods and humans, the Enlightened One, the Blessed One.
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The Teacher is the ultimately most perfect being and no one from any world (be it kamavacaraloka, rupaloka, arupaloka) can ever be compared to Him. No other religious leaders, Gods, Demons, any thinkers or philosophers can ever be compared to His Supreme Enlightenment. And this applies to all Sammasambuddha of the past, present, and future.
lf any teach Nirvāna is to cease,
Say unto such they lie.
If any teach Nirvāna is to live,
Say unto such they err.


- Sir Edwin Arnold
Alino
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Re: What is the Nature of Buddhas?

Post by Alino »

We can say that his nature is anicca, dukkha, anatta, but he perfectly aware of it in each moment without exceptions.

Also see AN 4.77
We don't live Samsara, Samsara is living us...

"Form, feelings, perceptions, formations, consciousness - don't care about us, we don't exist for them"
Tennyson
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Re: What is the Nature of Buddhas?

Post by Tennyson »

Ontheway wrote: Sat May 14, 2022 5:39 am
In short terms, what's a Buddha like, exactly?
Itipi so bhagavā arahaṁ sammāsambuddho vijjācaraṇasampanno sugato lokavidū anuttaro purisadammasārathi satthā devamanussānaṁ buddho bhagavā.

The Blessed One is an arahant, perfectly enlightened, accomplished in true knowledge and conduct, well gone, knower of the world, unsurpassed leader of persons to be tamed, teacher of gods and humans, the Enlightened One, the Blessed One.
The Teacher is the ultimately most perfect being and no one from any world (be it kamavacaraloka, rupaloka, arupaloka) can ever be compared to Him. No other religious leaders, Gods, Demons, any thinkers or philosophers can ever be compared to His Supreme Enlightenment. And this applies to all Sammasambuddha of the past, present, and future.
How many Sammasambuddhas have existed in this world? Is Shakyamuni the only one, or are there others talked about in the suttas or other texts? Is Shakyamuni the only one venerated in Theravada, or are others venerated alongside him?
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