Dhammāoke - hobby, Generosity, or "duty" of the Noble Ones

Buddhist ethical conduct including the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).
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Johann
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Dhammāoke - hobby, Generosity, or "duty" of the Noble Ones

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If searching for a good hobby, good Venerable, Upasaka, Upasika, Seeker and wishing to sacrifices toward the Juwels at first place, but also share one's Dhamma-Dana, back and all around, one may feel given to do so. Simply select a Sutta, teaching... , record, upload, put a audio-link in.

If good, one is able to even match all 10 kinds of merits with one strike, Magga and Phala, and in all cases, base for good reflections on good deeds.

https://sangham.net/

(Of course, all encouragements to dedicate likewise here, but not sure if welcome)

And to share another ones merits as encouragement, right as intro, as one thing is consuming, another, and lighting, the "doing of deeds bringing long joy", merits.
https://sangham.net/en/lib/authors/wijesinghe/punna wrote: We are living in troubled times. Dissension, strife and disharmony rule our lives. It is time to seek meaningful solace in qualities that elevate our mind, in order to overcome these seemingly insurmountable hurdles.

Naturally, we turn to The Enlightened One (The Buddha) for succour, for He cultivated such qualities that elevated His mind to the highest happiness and perfect Enlightenment, namely, the qualities of merit (puñña).

He preached that merit-making is a formidable antidote to overcome the many vicissitudes faced in our day-to-day lives. Hence He declared: ‘Do not fear merit-making. “Merit-making” is a term denoting happiness, what is desirable, pleasant, dear and charming. For I recall in my mind very well that after making merit for a long time, I experienced desirable, pleasant, dear and charming results for a long time. Let therefore a man train himself in merit-making that yields long-lasting happiness. Let him cultivate the practice of giving, virtuous conduct and a mind of mettā. By cultivating these qualities the wise man arrives in untroubled and happy states.’(1) And He exhorted: ‘Think not lightly of merit, saying, ʽʽIt will not come to me.ʼʼ Just as by the falling of water drops is a water-pot filled, even so, accumulating little by little, is a wise man filled with merit.’(2)

Being aware of the modern craze in society for the accumulation of material riches, we also decided to include what The Buddha identified as real riches.

We hope by reading this booklet you will be inspired to make more merit and accumulate real riches, both of which would be of advantage to you in this world and in the next.

We are most grateful to Ven. Ñāṇadassana of Nissaraṇa Vanaya, Meetirigala, for having made innumerable corrections in the original work and guided us in compiling this despite his onerous duties.

May all beings be well and happy.

Dr.Sarath Amerasekera
Dr. Mahen Wijesuriya
Mahinda Wijesinghe
October 2000
...
...and my English-skill in regard of reading is even more worse, so no starter....

so good, just did a Random-sutta page and a "teaser"

https://sangham.net/_media/en/tipitaka/ ... 9.than.mp3

Dedicated toward the Sublime Gems, having the Sublime Sangha as door in this world, my teacher, parents, Devas and all beings in all the realms.
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Re: Dhammāoke - hobby, Generosity, or "duty" of the Noble Ones

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The five benefits of listening to the Dhamma:

Dhammassavana Sutta: Listening to the Dhamma
https://sangham.net/_media/en/tipitaka/ ... 2.than.mp3

And Dhammaoka opens 3 ways of release, of the five, directly, while meditation is just the last and of course merely useless for one not reached the stream yet and seeks right liberation.
Release - Vimutti Sutta (AN 5:26)

The question has been sometimes asked: If right concentration is essential to gaining even the first level of awakening, how is it that people can gain awakening while listening to a Dhamma talk? This sutta shows how the act of listening to a Dhamma talk is one way of gaining the inspiration that leads to right concentration.

“Monks, there are these five openings to release where a monk—dwelling heedful, ardent, & resolute—releases his unreleased mind, or where his as-yet unended effluents go to their total end, or he reaches the as-yet-unreached unexcelled safety from bonds. Which five?

“There is the case, monks, where the Teacher or a fellow person leading the holy life teaches the Dhamma to a monk1. And in whatever way the Teacher or a fellow person leading the holy life teaches the Dhamma to the monk, in just that way the monk, with regard to that Dhamma, is sensitive to the meaning, is sensitive to the Dhamma. In him—sensitive to the meaning, sensitive to the Dhamma—joy is born. When he is joyful, rapture is born. In one who is enraptured at heart, the body grows calm. When the body is calm, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes concentrated. This, monks, is the first opening to release where a monk—dwelling heedful, ardent, & resolute—releases his unreleased mind, or where his as-yet unended effluents go to their total end, or he reaches the as-yet-unreached unexcelled safety from bonds.

“Further, it’s not that the Teacher or a fellow person leading the holy life teaches the Dhamma to the monk. But the monk teaches the Dhamma to others in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it2. And in whatever way he teaches the Dhamma to others in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it, in just that way the monk, with regard to that Dhamma, is sensitive to the meaning, is sensitive to the Dhamma. In him—sensitive to the meaning, sensitive to the Dhamma—joy is born. When he is joyful, rapture is born. In one who is enraptured at heart, the body grows calm. When the body is calm, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes concentrated. This, monks, is the second opening to release…

“Further, it’s not that the Teacher or a fellow person leading the holy life teaches the Dhamma to the monk, nor does the monk teach the Dhamma to others in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it. But he recites the Dhamma in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it. In whatever way he recites the Dhamma in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it, in just that way the monk, with regard to that Dhamma, is sensitive to the meaning, is sensitive to the Dhamma. In him—sensitive to the meaning, sensitive to the Dhamma—joy is born. When he is joyful, rapture is born. In one who is enraptured at heart, the body grows calm. When the body is calm, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes concentrated. This, monks, is the third opening to release…

“Further, it’s not that the Teacher or a fellow person leading the holy life teaches the Dhamma to the monk; nor does the monk teach the Dhamma to others in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it; nor does he recite the Dhamma in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it. But in his awareness he directs his thoughts to the Dhamma in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it; he evaluates it, & mentally examines it. In whatever way he, in his awareness, directs his thoughts to the Dhamma in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it, evaluates it, & mentally examines it, in just that way the monk, with regard to that Dhamma, is sensitive to the meaning, is sensitive to the Dhamma. In him—sensitive to the meaning, sensitive to the Dhamma—joy is born. When he is joyful, rapture is born. In one who is enraptured at heart, the body grows calm. When the body is calm, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes concentrated3. This, monks, is the fourth opening to release…

“Further, it’s not that the Teacher or a fellow person leading the holy life teaches the Dhamma to the monk; nor does the monk teach the Dhamma to others in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it; nor does he recite the Dhamma in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it; nor does he, in his awareness, direct his thoughts to the Dhamma in detail, as he has heard it, as he has learned it, evaluate it, or mentally examine it. But he has well grasped a certain theme of concentration, has attended to it well, sustained it well, has penetrated it well with discernment4. In whatever way he has well grasped a certain theme of concentration, has attended to it well, sustained it well, has penetrated it well with discernment, in just that way the monk, with regard to that Dhamma, is sensitive to the meaning, is sensitive to the Dhamma. In him—sensitive to the meaning, sensitive to the Dhamma—joy is born. When he is joyful, rapture is born. In one who is enraptured at heart, the body grows calm. When the body is calm, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes concentrated. This, monks, is the fifth opening to release…

“These, monks, are the five openings to release where a monk—dwelling heedful, ardent, & resolute—releases his unreleased mind, or where his as-yet unended effluents go to their total end, or he reaches the as-yet-unreached unexcelled safety from bonds.”
Last edited by Johann on Tue Aug 16, 2022 9:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Dhammāoke - hobby, Generosity, or "duty" of the Noble Ones

Post by Johann »

Inspiration given by Upasika Villa, adding videos to

Dhammassavana Sutta: Listening to the Dhamma and

Dullabha Sutta: Hard to Find
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