Insults

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Pasindu
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Insults

Post by Pasindu »

Dhammapada Kodhavagga, verse 227-230

In the city called "Savatti", there was a lay householder named Athula. He was the leader of 500 householders. One day, Athula, along with other householders, went to the temple to learn dhamma. They went in front of Revatha thero and asked to be adviced in dhamma. But Revatha thero was engrosed in jhana at the moment and couldn't hear them. This ​lack of response angered Athula and the householders, who stormed out and met Sariputta thero.

"Householder, what is the problem?" asked Sariputta thero.

"Venerable sir, we went to Revatha thero to ask for a dhamma sermon, but he just sat there without even looking at us. So out of anger we left there." Athua answered.

Seeing the determination of the group, Sariputta thero decided to do that determination justice. So he did a dhamma sermon by vividly explaining the deep abhidhamma facts. Most of this went right over their heads. And the group grew more and more frustrated. And they left there and met Ananda thero.

"What is the matter, householder?" asked Ananda thero.

"We went to see Revatha thero to listen to a dhamma sermon, but when we went there, he wouldn't even acknowledge us, so we went to see Sariputta thero, and the dhamma we heard there is overcomplicated. So we came to you. Please do a dhamma sermon that fit us." Athula responded.

Hearing that, and thinking that this group is unable to grasp deeper dhamma facts, Ananda thero adviced the group using very simple, easy to comprehend dhamma facts and ended the sermon quickly. This simplicity angered them too. They left there and met Lord Buddha.

Buddha: "Athula, why did you come here?"
Athula: "We came to listen to dhamma,
venerable sir"
Buddha: "Did you listened to dhamma before
coming to me?"

Athula speaks in anger:

"Yes venerable sir, we went to Revatha thero, where we were plainly ignored. Then we went to Sariputta thero, and the dhamma he told was overcomplicated and too long. Then we went to Ananda thero, who adviced us with dhamma meant for little children and dismissed us quickly. Frustrated by all these, we came to see you.

Hearing this, Buddha answered

"Poranametam Atula
netam ajjatanamiva
nindanti tunhimasinam
nindanti bahubhaninam
mitabhanimpi nindanti
natthi loke anindito"


Athula, this is nothing new. The world insults the one who keeps quiet. And the world insults the one who talks a lot. The world also insults the one who speaks in moderation. In this world, there are none who aren't insulted.


"Na cahu na ca bhavissati
na cetarahi vijjati
ekantam nindito poso
ekantam va pasamsito"


There is no person who has only heard insults. There is no person who has only heard praises.
There hasn't, isn't and won't.



"Yam ce vinnu pasamsanti
anuvicca suve suve
acchiddavuttim medhavim
pannasilasamahitam"


If the wise constantly praise someone with their wisdom, he who lives a flawless life full of virtue and intelligence-


"Nikkham jambonadasseva
ko tam ninditumarahati
devapi nam pasamsanti
brahmunapi pasamsito"


Who is fit to insult such a person who is like a nikkha of pure gold? Even gods and brahmas praise him.


At the end of this sermon Athula and 500 householders attained sotapanna fruit.
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DNS
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Re: Insults

Post by DNS »

:twothumbsup:

Good teaching and good reminder, for Dhamma discussions in-person or online, in forums like DW.
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DNS
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Re: Insults

Post by DNS »

The story reminds me of:

“You can please some of the people all of the time, you can please all of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time.”
--Abraham Lincoln
dharmacorps
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Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2015 7:33 pm

Re: Insults

Post by dharmacorps »

Definitely a great passage, especially relevant to a current underlying our culture where one attains social clout based on how offended, oppressed, or insulted they claim to be.
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