Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths - what can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
SarathW
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Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by SarathW »

Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?
Does Satipathana practice help you to improve your imotional intelegence?

“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”
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robertk
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by robertk »

SarathW wrote: Sat Jun 01, 2024 9:46 am
Does Satipathana practice help you to improve your imotional intelegence?

It should do. Satipatthana replaces ignorance and wrong view with understanding.

Getting upset, rebelling against pain, and expecting things to go our way, come about by not seeing things as they really are.
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Neo »

SarathW wrote: Sat Jun 01, 2024 9:46 am Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?
Does Satipathana practice help you to improve your imotional intelegence?
..
Why put in "connection to other path" section?

It will make you like a stone rock towards emotions!!

Then you can be :guns: and handle anyone accordingly.

Try stabilizing eyes to front & not move them while scanning, that will progress to "rock coldness".
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Goofaholix »

A lack of emotional intelligence is all about reactivity, impulsiveness, and following your emotions.

So hell yeah, development of a healthy emotional intelligence is foundational to our practice.
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by befriend »

the mind is inherently kind, or awareness/mindfulness. sila is social intelligence. the 8 fold path is all interconnected. i rememeber my mother said something that would usually annoy me, but i was meditating at the time, so i just saw it as a little microscopic experience, and then came back to my awareness instead of being annoyed.
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Sam Vara
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Sam Vara »

Yes, I think it has a very strong relationship. AN 8.39 says that one who maintains good sīla
gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings.
It's an interesting sort of "chicken & egg" question as to whether one needs to understand the need those beings have for that freedom in order to be motivated to keep the precepts; or whether the keeping of the precepts gives rise to that understanding. But either way, we are required to be mindful of the feelings of other beings, which is what emotional intelligence is largely about.

Moreover, being aware of our own mental states is important, as per the satipatthāna sutta.
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by SarathW »

Sam Vara wrote: Sun Jun 02, 2024 6:49 am Yes, I think it has a very strong relationship. AN 8.39 says that one who maintains good sīla
gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings.
It's an interesting sort of "chicken & egg" question as to whether one needs to understand the need those beings have for that freedom in order to be motivated to keep the precepts; or whether the keeping of the precepts gives rise to that understanding. But either way, we are required to be mindful of the feelings of other beings, which is what emotional intelligence is largely about.

Moreover, being aware of our own mental states is important, as per the satipatthāna sutta.
So in your opinion emotional intelligence means being aware of the feelings of other people?
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Sam Vara
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Sam Vara »

SarathW wrote: Sun Jun 02, 2024 7:01 am
Sam Vara wrote: Sun Jun 02, 2024 6:49 am Yes, I think it has a very strong relationship. AN 8.39 says that one who maintains good sīla
gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings.
It's an interesting sort of "chicken & egg" question as to whether one needs to understand the need those beings have for that freedom in order to be motivated to keep the precepts; or whether the keeping of the precepts gives rise to that understanding. But either way, we are required to be mindful of the feelings of other beings, which is what emotional intelligence is largely about.

Moreover, being aware of our own mental states is important, as per the satipatthāna sutta.
So in your opinion emotional intelligence means being aware of the feelings of other people?
And your own feelings, yes. It can mean a lot more, but without the awareness anything else is impossible.
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Dhammapardon »

Like having a finger on the neck feels the pulse of the heart, it's quite beneficial to have a 'finger' on the pulse of emotions and another 'finger' on the pulse of thoughts. Good for catching what's flowing in and what's flowing out and when they change. The challenge is doing it consistently.
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SarathW
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by SarathW »

Controversial Dhamma talk by a Sri Lankan monk in English.
Just be patient and listen.
He says emotional intelligence means Manasikara.


“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by asksky »

SarathW wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 5:46 am Controversial Dhamma talk by a Sri Lankan monk in English.
Just be patient and listen.
He says emotional intelligence means Manasikara.
He says that "yoniso manasikara" means "emotional intelligence". And then explains that by "emotional intelligence" he means "to see the seed of one's intention as soon as they arise". Which in common English, that is probably not what people would understand by emotional intelligence - at least I would have never guessed, but English is not my first nor second language, so I don't know.


I have been following this channel for some months, and their dhamma series help me to understand some topics. @SarathW, do you know who they are? He often refers to anicca as "unsustainability to things to follow our wishes". In lots of places it makes the teaching way clearer than the common translation of "impernance". Are they related to, or influenced by, Venerable Waharaka?

This chapter for me was really eye opener, (and afaik, way more controversial from the orthodox Theravada point of view)
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Radix »

SarathW wrote: Sat Jun 01, 2024 9:46 am Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?
Does Satipathana practice help you to improve your imotional intelegence?
No and no. They are mutually exclusive. They are only connected for the type of Buddhist who has or aspires to have a secular (upper) middle class mentality. Because this is what "emotional intelligence" essentially is: a secular (upper) middle class mentality. (This is the criticism sometimes aimed at Goleman's idea of EQ.) Of course, for not just a few Buddhists, this is what Buddhism or Dhamma practice is as well: a secular (upper) middle class mentality.

And even if we take a more relaxed view of "emotional intelligence", insofar as "emotional intelligence" entails empathy, it is mutually exclusive with Dhamma practice. Note that an arahant is devoid of empathy.
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Radix
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Radix »

Sam Vara wrote: Sun Jun 02, 2024 6:49 amBut either way, we are required to be mindful of the feelings of other beings, which is what emotional intelligence is largely about.
Except that for the most part, that "mindfulness of the feelings of other beings" is just a simulation, a performance according to a particular socially normative script.
Because to actually be mindful of the feelings of other beings, one would have to actually listen, actually engage in conversation, actually pay attention. But we can't have that, can we!
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Sam Vara
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by Sam Vara »

Radix wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 6:37 pm
Sam Vara wrote: Sun Jun 02, 2024 6:49 amBut either way, we are required to be mindful of the feelings of other beings, which is what emotional intelligence is largely about.
Except that for the most part, that "mindfulness of the feelings of other beings" is just a simulation, a performance according to a particular socially normative script.
Because to actually be mindful of the feelings of other beings, one would have to actually listen, actually engage in conversation, actually pay attention. But we can't have that, can we!
I think we can have that, but of course it is a skill which some people find more difficult. To be in the presence of someone who excels at that skill is uplifting.
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Re: Does emotional intelligence have any relationship to Buddhist teaching?

Post by SarathW »

asksky wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 1:19 pm
SarathW wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 5:46 am Controversial Dhamma talk by a Sri Lankan monk in English.
Just be patient and listen.
He says emotional intelligence means Manasikara.
He says that "yoniso manasikara" means "emotional intelligence". And then explains that by "emotional intelligence" he means "to see the seed of one's intention as soon as they arise". Which in common English, that is probably not what people would understand by emotional intelligence - at least I would have never guessed, but English is not my first nor second language, so I don't know.


I have been following this channel for some months, and their dhamma series help me to understand some topics. @SarathW, do you know who they are? He often refers to anicca as "unsustainability to things to follow our wishes". In lots of places it makes the teaching way clearer than the common translation of "impernance". Are they related to, or influenced by, Venerable Waharaka?

This chapter for me was really eye opener, (and afaik, way more controversial from the orthodox Theravada point of view)
Venerable Waharaka?
Yes he is from Waharaka group.
I am not a Waharaka fan but I can't discard them alltogether.
Sometimes they make good points and make sense.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”
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