SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.

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SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.

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SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.
Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi


https://suttacentral.net/en/sn11.3

At Savatthī. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus thus: “Bhikkhus!” [610]

“Venerable sir!” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:

“Bhikkhus, once in the past the devas and the asuras were arrayed for battle. Then Sakka, lord of the devas, addressed the Tavatiṃsa devas thus: ‘Dear sirs, when the devas are engaged in battle, if fear or trepidation or terror should arise, on that occasion you should look up at the crest of my standard. For when you look up at the crest of my standard, whatever fear or trepidation or terror you may have will be abandoned. [611]

“‘If you cannot look up at the crest of my standard, then you should look up at the crest of the deva-king Pajapati’s standard. For when you look up at the crest of his standard, whatever fear or trepidation or terror you may have will be abandoned.

“‘If you cannot look up at the crest of the deva-king Pajapati’s standard, then you should look up at the crest of the deva-king Varuṇa’s standard…. If you cannot look up at the crest of the deva-king Varuṇa’s standard, then you should look up at the crest of the deva-king Isana’s standard…. For when you look up at the crest of his standard, whatever fear or trepidation or terror you may have will be abandoned.’ [612]

“Bhikkhus, for those who look up at the crest of the standard of Sakka, lord of the devas; or of Pajapati, the deva-king; or of Varuṇa, the deva-king; or of Isana, the deva-king, whatever fear or trepidation or terror they may have may or may not be abandoned. For what reason? Because Sakka, lord of the devas, is not devoid of lust, not devoid of hatred, not devoid of delusion; he can be timid, petrified, frightened, quick to flee.

“But, bhikkhus, I say this: If you have gone to a forest or to the foot of a tree or to an empty hut, and fear or trepidation or terror should arise in you, on that occasion you should recollect me thus: ‘The Blessed One is an arahant, perfectly enlightened, accomplished in true knowledge and conduct, fortunate, knower of the world, unsurpassed leader of persons to be tamed, teacher of devas and humans, the Enlightened One, the Blessed One.’ For when you recollect me, bhikkhus, whatever fear or trepidation or terror you may have will be abandoned.

“If you cannot recollect me, then you should recollect the Dhamma thus: ‘The Dhamma is well expounded by the Blessed One, directly visible, immediate, inviting one to come and see, applicable, to be personally experienced by the wise.’ For when you recollect the Dhamma, bhikkhus, whatever fear or trepidation or terror you may have will be abandoned.

“If you cannot recollect the Dhamma, then you should recollect the Saṅgha thus: ‘The Saṅgha of the Blessed One’s disciples is practising the good way, practising the straight way, practising the true way, practising the proper way; that is, the four pairs of persons, the eight types of individuals—this Saṅgha of the Blessed One’s disciples is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of reverential salutation, the unsurpassed field of merit for the world.’ For when you recollect the Saṅgha, bhikkhus, whatever fear or trepidation or terror you may have will be abandoned.

“For what reason? Because, bhikkhus, the Tathagata, the Arahant, the Perfectly Enlightened One is devoid of lust, devoid of hatred, devoid of delusion; he is brave, courageous, bold, ready to stand his place.”

This is what the Blessed One said. Having said this, the Fortunate One, the Teacher, further said this:
  • “In a forest, at the foot of a tree,
    Or in an empty hut, O bhikkhus,
    You should recollect the Buddha:
    No fear will then arise in you.

    “But if you cannot recall the Buddha,
    Best in the world, the bull of men,
    Then you should recall the Dhamma,
    Emancipating, well expounded.

    “But if you cannot recall the Dhamma,
    Emancipating, well expounded,
    Then you should recall the Saṅgha,
    The unsurpassed field of merit.

    “For those who thus recall the Buddha,
    The Dhamma, and the Saṅgha, bhikkhus,
    No fear or trepidation will arise,
    Nor any grisly terror.”
Notes

[610] This sutta is a popular paritta or protective discourse, included in the Maha Pirit Pota. The Northern Buddhist tradition has preserved versions in Tibetan and Chinese, translated from the Skt, and Skt fragments also have been found. The various versions are discussed in detail by Skilling, Mahā Sūtras II, pp. 441-67.

[611] Spk does not gloss the compound dhajagga, but it occurs at AN III 89,17 foll. [AN 5.75]and is explained at Mp III 267,18 as “the crests of standards raised up from the backs of elephants, horses, etc., or from chariots.” Skilling discusses the Skt words dhvaja and dhvajāgra at length and concludes that “in its early form a dhvaja was a pole surmounted by an emblem, carried as a military or royal symbol” (Mahā Sūtras II, p. 457). The emblem is the dhvajāgra, the “crest of the standard,” though it seems that over time the two terms came to be used almost interchangeably. Since the standard often also bore a flag, the word dhvaja eventually was transferred to the flag; this understanding of the term seems to be implicit in Spk’s remark (just below). Dhaja occurs at v. 226a. [SN 1.72].

Spk: “The crest of Sakka’s standard is raised up from his chariot 250 yojanas high, and when it is struck by the wind it gives forth the sound of a five-piece orchestra. When the devas look up at it, they think, ‘Our king has come and stands by his troops like a deeply planted pillar. Of whom need we be afraid?’ Thus they have no fear.”

[612] Of these three deities, Spk says only that Pajāpati is of the same appearance and life span as Sakka and gets the second seat, while Varuṇa and Īsāna respectively get the third and fourth seats. According to MW, Prajāpati was originally “lord of creatures, creator, … a supreme god above the Vedic deities.” Varuṇa “is one of the oldest Vedic gods … often regarded as the supreme deity.” Īsāna is “one of the older names of Śiva-Rudra.”
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Re: SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.

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SN 11.3 PTS: S i 218 CDB i 319 Dhajagga Sutta: Banner Protection
translated from the Pali by Piyadassi Thera


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .piya.html

Thus have I heard:

On one occasion the Blessed One was living near Savatthi at Jetavana at the monastery of Anathapindika. Then he addressed the monks saying, "O monks." — "Venerable Sir," said the monks by way of reply to the Blessed One. Thereupon he spoke as follows:

"Monks, I shall relate a former incident. There arose a battle between the Devas (gods) and Asuras. Then Sakka, the Lord of the devas, addressed the devas of the Tavatimsa heaven thus:

"'Happy ones, if the devas who have gone to the battle should experience fear or terror or suffer from hair standing on end, let them behold the crest of my own banner. If you do so, any fear, terror or hair standing on end arising in you will pass away.

"'If you fail to look up to the crest of my banner, look at the crest of the banner of Pajapati, King of gods. If you do so, any fear, terror or hair standing on end arising in you will pass away.

"'If you fail to look up to the crest of Pajapati, King of the gods, look at the crest of the banner of Varuna, King of the gods. If you do so, any fear, terror or hair standing on end arising in you will pass away.'

"Monks, any fear, terror or hair standing on end arising in them who look at the crest of the banner of Sakka... The Lord of the gods, of Pajapati... of Varuna... of Isana, the King of the gods, any fear terror or hair standing on end, may pass away, or may not pass away. What is the reason for this?

"Sakka, the Lord of gods, O monks, is not free from lust, not free from hate, not free from delusion, and is therefore liable to fear, terror, fright, and flight. I also say unto you O monks — if any fear, terror or hair standing on end should arise in you when you have gone to the forest or to the foot of a tree, or to an empty house (lonely place), then think only of me thus:

"'Such Indeed is the Blessed One, arahant (Consummate One), supremely enlightened, endowed with knowledge and virtue, welcome being, knower of worlds, the peerless trainer of persons, teacher of gods and men, the Buddha, the Blessed One.' Monks, if you think of me, any fear, terror, or standing of hair on end, that may arise in you, will pass away.

"If you fail to think of me, then think of the Dhamma (the Doctrine) thus: 'Well expounded is the Dhamma by the Blessed One, a Dhamma to be realized by oneself and gives immediate results, a Dhamma which invites investigation and leads up to Nibbana, a Dhamma to be understood by the wise each for himself.' Monks, if you think of the Dhamma, any fear, terror or hair standing on end, that may arise in you, will pass away.

"If you fail to think of the Dhamma, then think of the Sangha (the Order) thus: 'Of good conduct is the Order of Disciples of the Blessed One, of upright conduct is the Order of Disciples of the Blessed One, of wise conduct is the Order of Disciples of the Blessed One, of dutiful conduct is the Order of Disciples of the Blessed One. This Order of Disciples of the Blessed One — namely those four pairs of persons,[1] the eight kinds of individuals[2] — is worthy of offerings, is worthy of hospitality, is worthy of gifts, is worthy of reverential salutations, is an incomparable field of merit for the world.' Monks, if you think of the Sangha, any fear, terror or hair standing on end, that may arise in you, will pass away. What is the reason for this? The Tathagata, O monks, who is arahant, supremely enlightened, is free from lust, free from hate, is free from delusion, and is not liable to fear, terror, fright or flight."

So said the Blessed One. Having thus spoken, the teacher, the "Welcome Being" (Sugata), further said:
  • i. Whether in forest or at foot of tree,
    Or in some secluded spot, O monks,
    Do call to mind that Buddha Supreme;
    Then will there be no fear to you at all.

    ii. If you think not of the Buddha, O monks,
    That Lord of the world and Chief of men,
    Then do think, O monks, of that Dhamma;
    So well preached and leading to Nibbana.

    iii. If you think not of the Dhamma, O monks
    Well preached and leading to Nibbana;
    Then do think, O monks, of that Sangha,
    That wonderful field of merit to all.

    iv. To those recalling the Buddha supreme,
    To those recalling the Dhamma sublime,
    And to those recalling the Sangha,
    No fear, no terror will make them quiver.
Notes

1. The four pairs of persons constitute the four kinds of aryan disciples who have attained the four paths and four fruits of sanctity (magga and phala), namely: sotapatti, "stream-entry"; sakadagami, "once-return"; anagami, "non-return"; and arahattha, arahantship, the fourth and the last stage at which all fetters are severed and taints rooted out.

2. The above four pairs become eight when the Paths and Fruits are regarded separately.
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Re: SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.

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SN 11.3 PTS: S i 218 CDB i 319 Dhajagga Sutta: The Top of the Standard
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


Are you ever overcome by fear? The Buddha offers an antidote.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html


On one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. There he addressed the monks, "Monks!"

"Yes, lord," the monks responded to him.

The Blessed One said, "Monks, once the devas & asuras were arrayed for battle. Then Sakka, the chief of the devas, addressed the devas of the Thirty-three: 'If, dear sirs, when the devas have gone into battle, there should arise fear, terror, or horripilation, then on that occasion you should catch sight of the top of my standard. For when you have caught sight of the top of my standard, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation there is will be abandoned.

"'If you can't catch sight of the top of my standard, then you should catch sight of the top of the deva-king Pajapati's standard. For when you have caught sight of the top of the deva-king Pajapati's standard, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation there is will be abandoned.

"'If you can't catch sight of the top of the deva-king Pajapati's standard, then you should catch sight of the top of the deva-king Varuna's standard. For when For when you have caught sight of the top of the deva-king Varuna's standard, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation there is will be abandoned.

"'If you can't catch sight of the top of the deva-king Varuna's standard, then you should catch sight of the top of the deva-king Isana's standard. For when you have caught sight of the top of the deva-king Isana's standard, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation there is will be abandoned.'

"But, monks, when the top of the deva-chief Sakka's standard is caught sight of, or when the top of the deva-king Pajapati's standard is caught sight of, or when the top of the deva-king Varuna's standard is caught sight of, or when the top of the deva-king Isana's standard is caught sight of, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation there is may be abandoned or may not be abandoned. Why is that? Because Sakka the chief of the devas is not devoid of passion, not devoid of aversion, not devoid of delusion. He feels fear, feels terror, feels dread. He runs away.

"But I tell you this: If — when you have gone into the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building — there should arise fear, terror, or horripilation, then on that occasion you should recollect me: 'Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy & rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the world, unexcelled as a trainer for those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings, awakened, blessed.' For when you have recollected me, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation there is will be abandoned.

"If you can't recollect me, then you should recollect the Dhamma: 'The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One, to be seen here & now, timeless, inviting verification, pertinent, to be realized by the wise for themselves.' For when you have recollected the Dhamma, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation there is will be abandoned.

"If you can't recollect the Dhamma, then you should recollect the Sangha: 'The Sangha of the Blessed One's disciples who have practiced well... who have practiced straight-forwardly... who have practiced methodically... who have practiced masterfully — in other words, the four types of noble disciples when taken as pairs, the eight when taken as individual types [1] — they are the Sangha of the Blessed One's disciples: worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, the unexcelled field of merit for the world.' For when you have recollected the Sangha, whatever fear, terror, or horripilation where is will be abandoned. Why is that? Because the Tathagata — worthy & rightly self-awakened — is devoid of passion, devoid of aversion, devoid of delusion. He feels no fear, feels no terror, feels no dread. He doesn't run away."

That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One-well-gone, the Teacher, further said this:
  • In the wilderness,
    in the shade of a tree,
    in an empty building, monks,
    recollect the Buddha.
    Your fear won't exist.

    If you can't recall the Buddha
    — best in the world,
    the bull of men —
    then you should recall the Dhamma:
    leading outward, well-taught.

    If you can't recall the Dhamma
    — leading outward,
    well-taught —
    then you should recall the Sangha:
    the field of merit unexcelled.

    When thus recalling
    the Buddha, Dhamma, & Sangha, monks,
    there'll be no horripilation,
    terror,
    or fear.
Notes

1. The four pairs are (1) the person on the path to stream-entry, the person experiencing the fruit of stream-entry; (2) the person on the path to once-returning, the person experiencing the fruit of once-returning; (3) the person on the path to non-returning, the person experiencing the fruit of non-returning; (4) the person on the path to arahantship, the person experiencing the fruit of arahantship. The eight individuals are the eight types forming these four pairs.
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Re: SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.

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Re: SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.

Post by mikenz66 »

This sutta is a popular paritta or protective discourse, but the chanting books tend to only have the central portions, sometimes from "But, bhikkhus, I say this: If you have gone to a forest or to the foot of a tree or to an empty hut", sometimes just the specific qualities of the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha:
Itipi so bhagava araham samma-sambuddho,
He is a Blessed One, a Worthy One, a Rightly Self-awakened One,
...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... anting.pdf
:anjali:
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Re: SN 11.3 Dhajagga Sutta. The Crest of the Standard.

Post by mikenz66 »

The abbreviated chant can be found here as "Itipi So Bhagava":
http://www.amaravati.org/audio/parittas ... a-page-39/

:anjali:
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