is anapanasati concentration?

The cultivation of calm or tranquility and the development of concentration
lithos
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is anapanasati concentration?

Post by lithos »

This is my first post here. I have a doubt about the anapanasati meditation. Looking at different approaches to anapanasati meditation I find that some authors inmmediately direct the meditation to a point of concentration: the tip of the nose, over the lips... But reading at the sutta itself I don´t find any instruction of this, it seems rather to indicate that attention has to spread throughout the body:
He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in experiencing the whole body of breath’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out experiencing the whole body of breath.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in tranquillising the bodily formation’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out tranquillising the bodily formation.’
SuttaCentral MN 118.
These are two different ways of focusing attention. :shrug:
Srilankaputra
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by Srilankaputra »

Suppose there were a tree trunk placed on a level piece of ground, and a man
cut it with a saw. The man's mindfulness is established by the saw's teeth
where they touch the tree trunk, without his giving attention to the saw's teeth
as they approach and recede, though they are not unrecognized by him as
they do so; and he manifests endeavour, carries out a task and achieves a
distinctive effect.

As the tree trunk placed on the level piece of ground, so the sign for the
anchoring of mindfulness [at the nose tip or on the upper lip]. As the saw's
teeth, so the in-breaths and out-breaths. As the man's mindfulness,
established by the saw's teeth where they touch the tree trunk, without his
giving attention to the saw's teeth as they approach and recede, though they
are not unrecognized by him as they do so, and so he manifests endeavour,
carries out a task and achieves a distinctive effect, so too the bhikkhu sits,
having established mindfulness at the nose tip [where the breath touches (i.e.
is felt) if breathing through the nose] or on the upper lip [where the breath
touches (i.e. is felt) if breathing through the mouth], without giving attention
to the in-breaths and out-breaths as they approach and recede, though they
are not unrecognized by him as they do so, and he manifests endeavour,
carries out a task and achieves a distinctive effect.

What is the endeavour? The body and the mind of one who is energetic
become wieldy: this is the endeavour.

What is the task? Imperfections come to be abandoned in one who is
energetic, and his thoughts (vitakka) are stilled: this is the task.

What is the effect? Fetters come to be abandoned in one who is energetic, and
his underlying tendencies come to be done away with: this is the distinctive
effect.
Patisambidhamagga

Or it's like riding a bike, if we don't paddle momentum will be lost we want be able to keep balance. If the attention is too much on the paddles we want see where we are going. Watch out for that tree!

Wish you all success in all your endeavours. Goodbye!
Srilankaputra
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by Srilankaputra »

The use of any meditation theme has the same principle underlying it. It like how mothers pacify their baby when it's upset. They show it a flower or an animal or something. The baby soon forgets why it was upset and starts laughing. But a babies mind and our minds are very different. A baby has few wishes and needs. we have many wishes and needs. Some preliminary work might be neccesary.
“Mendicants, I do not see a single thing that gives rise to skillful qualities, or makes unskillful qualities decline like having few wishes.

When you have few wishes, skillful qualities arise and unskillful qualities decline.”
AN1.63
Monk, bail out this boat.
It will take you lightly when bailed.
-Dhammapada
It is easier to carry an empty cup
than one that is filled to the brim.
-Laozi

Wish you all success in all your endeavours. Goodbye!
lithos
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by lithos »

Thanks for your answers Srilankaputra.
I don´t know the Patisambidhamagga, I´ll look at it.
I understand that the object of meditation serves to calm the mind but in the anapanasati sutta it does not speak of any specific point to which to direct the attention, rather it speaks of states: rapture, bliss, and then the mind... increasingly subtle states, being conscious of breathing all the time. For me this is a new way of meditation. If I understand correctly at no time you abandon body consciousness, as long as you are following the breath. Is my interpretation correct?
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DooDoot
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by DooDoot »

lithos wrote: Sun Jul 28, 2019 5:47 pm I don´t know the Patisambidhamagga
The Patisambidhamagga is a commentary said to possibly be written 700 years after the Buddha.
Srilankaputra wrote: Sun Jul 28, 2019 2:00 pm so too the bhikkhu sits, having established mindfulness at the nose tip [where the breath touches (i.e. is felt) if breathing through the nose] or on the upper lip [where the breath touches (i.e. is felt) if breathing through the mouth], without giving attention to the in-breaths and out-breaths as they approach and recede, though they are not unrecognized by him as they do so, and he manifests endeavour, carries out a task and achieves a distinctive effect.
I doubt the above will work for a long period of time. I imagine the "distinctive effect" achieved might be getting a headache or falling asleep.
lithos wrote: Sun Jul 28, 2019 9:27 amBut reading at the sutta itself I don´t find any instruction of this, it seems rather to indicate that attention has to spread throughout the body:
He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in experiencing the whole body of breath’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out experiencing the whole body of breath.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in tranquillising the bodily formation’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out tranquillising the bodily formation.’
SuttaCentral MN 118.
These are two different ways of focusing attention. :shrug:
MN 118 says to 'bring mindfulness to the fore'. Being 'mindful' means to keep the mind free from unwholesome mental states and thus to generate a mind of clear consciousness (awareness). If the mind is clear, it can feel the breathing throughout the body. Then later, as the breathing tranquillises, the breathing will be felt only near the nose-tip.

You can prematurely experiment with watching breathing at the nose-tip because this is a good training exercise which, most importantly, may provide a taste of tranquility. But, in my experience, if you keep trying to (prematurely) keep your mind at the nose-tip, the mind will get drowsy or start "sinking". There is really no need to try to watch the breathing in any particularly part of the body. If you can keep the mind clear & quiet, the breathing will be known & felt wherever it is natural to do so.

To end, generally, it is taught it is best to learn to know the breathing throughout the body; as the breathing moves from the nose, to throat, to chest, to abdomen and back again. This develops a more alert & sensitive mind.

Regards & best wishes :smile:
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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Srilankaputra
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by Srilankaputra »

lithos wrote: Sun Jul 28, 2019 5:47 pm Thanks for your answers Srilankaputra.
I don´t know the Patisambidhamagga, I´ll look at it.
I understand that the object of meditation serves to calm the mind but in the anapanasati sutta it does not speak of any specific point to which to direct the attention, rather it speaks of states: rapture, bliss, and then the mind... increasingly subtle states, being conscious of breathing all the time. For me this is a new way of meditation. If I understand correctly at no time you abandon body consciousness, as long as you are following the breath. Is my interpretation correct?
Hi,

This is a controversial point(at least among contemporary buddhists). You might like to search for past discussions on 'Parimukha' here on DW. For my self ; parimukhaṃ. [pari+mukha]. = around the mouth, around the nostrils, around the entrance (by which the air gets into the body). Anapanasati is a form of air kasina, so it is clear(for my self atleast) why parimukha means as above.

But don't be afraid to experiment,
We never understand a thing so well,and make it our own, as when we have discovered it for ourselves.

Wish you all success in all your endeavours. Goodbye!
sunnat
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by sunnat »

Yes, it seems to be a controversial point and as stated, as the Buddha himself repearedly stated, work out your own salvation. Meanwhile there are other reasons to take the literal translation of 'around the mouth' seriously.

Wise ones like the Venerable Webu Sayadaw (reputed to have been an arahant) said so. Many other accomplished meditators and teachers said/say so.

The meditation should make the mind aware of very subtle, fine things. If you always work with coarse, large things like the abdomen or chest the mind doesn't get the same fine focus. Start coarse, like below the nose around the mouth and when the awareness of the breath is clear there go to only a small fingertip area immediately below between the nostrils and practice paitently and diligently to keep the mind focused there for longer and longer times. Eventually this becomes the norm for you in concentration. If you're always working with large areas your concentration will remain gross.

Also the focus of the meditation should be real and not manufactured or imagined, no image(mach)inations or words. You might use tricks to start like wet your lips so you feel the breath easier or press with your hand and let go but abandon such created realities and focus on the natural, real truth. Don't make the tricks a habit.
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DooDoot
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by DooDoot »

Srilankaputra wrote: Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:44 am This is a controversial point(at least among contemporary buddhists). You might like to search for past discussions on 'Parimukha' here on DW. For my self ; parimukhaṃ. [pari+mukha]. = around the mouth, around the nostrils, around the entrance (by which the air gets into the body).
Its only controversial when, in practise, it doesn't mean around the mouth, around the nostrils, but you think it does. Notice how 'mukha' literally means 'mouth' but then you must fudge it to mean 'nostrils'; then others fudge it to mean 'face'. Obviously the sutta below is not referring to 'mouth':
Addasā kho bhagavā āyasmantaṃ mahākaccānaṃ avidūre nisinnaṃ pallaṅkaṃ ābhujitvā ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya kāyagatāya satiyā ajjhattaṃ parimukhaṃ sūpaṭṭhitāya.

The Blessed One saw Ven. Mahā Kaccāyana sitting not far away, his legs crossed, his body held erect, having mindfulness immersed in the body well-established to the fore within.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
"Endowed with this noble aggregate of virtue, this noble restraint over the sense faculties, this noble mindfulness & alertness, he seeks out a secluded dwelling: a wilderness, the shade of a tree, a mountain, a glen, a hillside cave, a charnel ground, a forest grove, the open air, a heap of straw. After his meal, returning from his alms round, he sits down, crosses his legs, holds his body erect, and brings mindfulness to the fore.

"Abandoning covetousness with regard to the world, he dwells with an awareness devoid of covetousness. He cleanses his mind of covetousness. Abandoning ill will & anger, he dwells with an awareness devoid of ill will, sympathetic with the welfare of all living beings. He cleanses his mind of ill will & anger. Abandoning sloth & drowsiness, he dwells with an awareness devoid of sloth & drowsiness, mindful, alert, percipient of light. He cleanses his mind of sloth & drowsiness. Abandoning restlessness & anxiety, he dwells undisturbed, his mind inwardly stilled. He cleanses his mind of restlessness & anxiety. Abandoning uncertainty, he dwells having crossed over uncertainty, with no perplexity with regard to skillful mental qualities. He cleanses his mind of uncertainty.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
ānāpānassati ca vo ajjhattaṃ parimukhaṃ sūpaṭṭhitā hotu

Bhikkhus, live contemplating the foulness of the body. Let mindfulness of breathing be inwardly well established before you. Live contemplating the impermanence of all formations.

https://suttacentral.net/iti85/en/ireland
Since ānāpānassati is 16 experiences, how can each 16 experiences be "in front of the mouth"? :shrug:

In proper deep samadhi, consciousness falls into the body. Haven't you ever observed a deep meditator, when they drop into samadhi and their eyes sometimes roll back and their consciousness literally drops down through their throat (as it opens) into their body. :smile:
sunnat wrote: Mon Jul 29, 2019 6:14 amThe meditation should make the mind aware of very subtle, fine things. If you always work with coarse, large things like the abdomen or chest the mind doesn't get the same fine focus. Start coarse, like below the nose around the mouth and when the awareness of the breath is clear there go to only a small fingertip area immediately below between the nostrils and practice paitently and diligently to keep the mind focused there for longer and longer times. Eventually this becomes the norm for you in concentration. If you're always working with large areas your concentration will remain gross.
The above is not how it is. The mind of 'samadhi' is 'vast' rather than 'narrow'. For example, from MN 119 about jhana:
He permeates & pervades, suffuses & fills this very body with the rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal. Just as if a skilled bathman or bathman's apprentice would pour bath powder into a brass basin and knead it together, sprinkling it again & again with water, so that his ball of bath powder — saturated, moisture-laden, permeated within & without — would nevertheless not drip; even so, the monk permeates... this very body with the rapture & pleasure born of withdrawal. There is nothing of his entire body unpervaded by rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal. And as he remains thus heedful, ardent, & resolute, any memories & resolves related to the household life are abandoned, and with their abandoning his mind gathers & settles inwardly, grows unified & centered. This is how a monk develops mindfulness immersed in the body.
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by sunnat »

Correct, 'body in body'. From one pointed focus, of awareness of the breath in the area around the mouth, developed diligently, ardently, to when one 'drops' into the body, seeing the body in the body, seeing the dhamma. It's a distinct unmistakeable experience. To be experienced to be understood.
lithos
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by lithos »

DooDoot the quotes you mention are very clarifying. It is very interesting to find that even in jhana the factor of rapture has to be spread throughout the body. In anapanasati sutta the word concentration only appears once
“He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in experiencing the mind’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out experiencing the mind.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in gladdening the mind’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out gladdening the mind.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in concentrating the mind’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out concentrating the mind.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in liberating the mind’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out liberating the mind.’
Thes rest of the sutta speaks of "understanding", "experiencing","tranquillising", "contemplating". I still don´t see at what point it indicates the concentration at a specific point.
Sunat wrote:
The meditation should make the mind aware of very subtle, fine things. If you always work with coarse, large things like the abdomen or chest the mind doesn't get the same fine focus. Start coarse, like below the nose around the mouth and when the awareness of the breath is clear there go to only a small fingertip area immediately below between the nostrils and practice paitently and diligently to keep the mind focused there for longer and longer times. Eventually this becomes the norm for you in concentration. If you're always working with large areas your concentration will remain gross.
About concentration, as I understand it, I think that something gross, coarse, is for instance, the physical body or any part of it, no matter how small it is, when we talk about subtle we mean states like rapture, happiness, peace. Then in the sutta it seems to indicate a kind of ladder towards increasingly subtle states, but without loosing contact with the body.
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by santa100 »

lithos wrote:Looking at different approaches to anapanasati meditation I find that some authors inmmediately direct the meditation to a point of concentration: the tip of the nose, over the lips... But reading at the sutta itself I don´t find any instruction of this, it seems rather to indicate that attention has to spread throughout the body
True, MN 118 did not specifically designate a particular focus zone on the body. But that's a feature instead of a flaw. Without being overly restrictive, it left enough room for the practitioner to experiment with to find the most suitable area for him/her to focus on. But the overall objective should be pretty clear: out of the 4 tetrads, the first 3 are related to Samatha cultivation, and the 4th and last one is related to Vipassana practice. Samatha/serenity is definitely a concentration practice.
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by Srilankaputra »

DooDoot wrote: Mon Jul 29, 2019 7:15 am
Srilankaputra wrote: Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:44 am This is a controversial point(at least among contemporary buddhists). You might like to search for past discussions on 'Parimukha' here on DW. For my self ; parimukhaṃ. [pari+mukha]. = around the mouth, around the nostrils, around the entrance (by which the air gets into the body).
Its only controversial when, in practise, it doesn't mean around the mouth, around the nostrils, but you think it does. Notice how 'mukha' literally means 'mouth' but then you must fudge it to mean 'nostrils'; then others fudge it to mean 'face'. Obviously the sutta below is not referring to 'mouth':
Addasā kho bhagavā āyasmantaṃ mahākaccānaṃ avidūre nisinnaṃ pallaṅkaṃ ābhujitvā ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya kāyagatāya satiyā ajjhattaṃ parimukhaṃ sūpaṭṭhitāya.

The Blessed One saw Ven. Mahā Kaccāyana sitting not far away, his legs crossed, his body held erect, having mindfulness immersed in the body well-established to the fore within.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html

Obvious? What is quite obvious(at least to me) is you are not protecting the truth, rather you are trying to protect your view(ditti). But still i will engage with you.

MN10 when talking about practices of mindfulness of the body lists six practices which one do you think Ven Maha Kaccayana is engaged in ?

Wish you all success in all your endeavours. Goodbye!
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DooDoot
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by DooDoot »

Srilankaputra wrote: Tue Jul 30, 2019 4:19 amObvious? What is quite obvious(at least to me) is you are not protecting the truth, rather you are trying to protect your view (ditti). But still i will engage with you.
No. Obviously you were unable to prove your point using sutta but, instead, resorted to an unsubstantiated personal attack. The sutta I quoted clearly states: "having mindfulness immersed in the body well-established to the fore within".

In summary, I am protecting the truth. The truth is 'parimukhaṃ' does not mean watching at the nose-tip. The OP has logically discerned how watching at the nose-tip and experiencing the whole body are contradictory.
Srilankaputra wrote: Tue Jul 30, 2019 4:19 amMN10 when talking about practices of mindfulness of the body lists six practices which one do you think Ven Maha Kaccayana is engaged in ?
Incomprehensible.
lithos wrote: Sun Jul 28, 2019 9:27 amThis is my first post here. I have a doubt about the anapanasati meditation. Looking at different approaches to anapanasati meditation I find that some authors inmmediately direct the meditation to a point of concentration: the tip of the nose, over the lips... But reading at the sutta itself I don´t find any instruction of this, it seems rather to indicate that attention has to spread throughout the body:
He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in experiencing the whole body of breath’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out experiencing the whole body of breath.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in tranquillising the bodily formation’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out tranquillising the bodily formation.’
SuttaCentral MN 118.
These are two different ways of focusing attention. :shrug:
You should follow what the sutta says rather than follow authors. Best wishes. :smile:
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/anapanasati
Srilankaputra
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by Srilankaputra »

DooDoot wrote: Tue Jul 30, 2019 6:49 am
Srilankaputra wrote: Tue Jul 30, 2019 4:19 amObvious? What is quite obvious(at least to me) is you are not protecting the truth, rather you are trying to protect your view (ditti). But still i will engage with you.
No. Obviously you were defeated here because you were unable to prove your point using sutta but, instead, resorted to an unsubstantiated personal attack. The sutta I quoted clearly states: "having mindfulness immersed in the body well-established to the fore within".
you misunderstand the point i am trying to make. The sutta you quoted is not sufficient to prove any point either way. This is what i meant by protecting the truth.

DooDoot wrote: Tue Jul 30, 2019 6:49 am
Srilankaputra wrote: Tue Jul 30, 2019 4:19 amMN10 when talking about practices of mindfulness of the body lists six practices which one do you think Ven Maha Kaccayana is engaged in ?
Incomprehensible.
Feigning incomprehensibility? (i'll give you benefit of the doubt).
1. Observing the Body

1.1. Mindfulness of Breathing
And how does a mendicant meditate observing an aspect of the body?

It’s when a mendicant—gone to a wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty hut—sits down cross-legged, with their body straight, and focuses their mindfulness right there. Just mindful, they breathe in. Mindful, they breathe out.

When breathing in heavily they know: ‘I’m breathing in heavily.’ When breathing out heavily they know: ‘I’m breathing out heavily.’

When breathing in lightly they know: ‘I’m breathing in lightly.’ When breathing out lightly they know: ‘I’m breathing out lightly.’

They practice breathing in experiencing the whole body. They practice breathing out experiencing the whole body.

They practice breathing in stilling the body’s motion. They practice breathing out stilling the body’s motion.

It’s like a deft carpenter or carpenter’s apprentice. When making a deep cut they know: ‘I’m making a deep cut,’ and when making a shallow cut they know: ‘I’m making a shallow cut.’

And so they meditate observing an aspect of the body internally, externally, and both internally and externally. They meditate observing the body as liable to originate, as liable to vanish, and as liable to both originate and vanish. Or mindfulness is established that the body exists, to the extent necessary for knowledge and mindfulness. They meditate independent, not grasping at anything in the world.

That’s how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.


1.2. The Postures
Furthermore, when a mendicant is walking they know: ‘I am walking.’ When standing they know: ‘I am standing.’ When sitting they know: ‘I am sitting.’ And when lying down they know: ‘I am lying down.’ Whatever posture their body is in, they know it.

And so they meditate observing an aspect of the body internally, externally, and both internally and externally. They meditate observing the body as liable to originate, as liable to vanish, and as liable to both originate and vanish. Or mindfulness is established that the body exists, to the extent necessary for knowledge and mindfulness. They meditate independent, not grasping at anything in the world.

That too is how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.


1.3. Situational Awareness
Furthermore, a mendicant acts with situational awareness when going out and coming back; when looking ahead and aside; when bending and extending the limbs; when bearing the outer robe, bowl and robes; when eating, drinking, chewing, and tasting; when urinating and defecating; when walking, standing, sitting, sleeping, waking, speaking, and keeping silent.

And so they meditate observing an aspect of the body internally …

That too is how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.


1.4. Focusing on the Repulsive
Furthermore, a mendicant examines their own body, up from the soles of the feet and down from the tips of the hairs, wrapped in skin and full of many kinds of filth. ‘In this body there is head hair, body hair, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, diaphragm, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, undigested food, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, snot, synovial fluid, urine.’

It’s as if there were a bag with openings at both ends, filled with various kinds of grains, such as fine rice, wheat, mung beans, peas, sesame, and ordinary rice. And someone with good eyesight were to open it and examine the contents: ‘These grains are fine rice, these are wheat, these are mung beans, these are peas, these are sesame, and these are ordinary rice.’


And so they meditate observing an aspect of the body internally …

That too is how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.


1.5. Focusing on the Elements
Furthermore, a mendicant examines their own body, whatever its placement or posture, according to the elements: ‘In this body there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element, and the air element.’

It’s as if a deft butcher or butcher’s apprentice were to kill a cow and sit down at the crossroads with the meat cut into portions.


And so they meditate observing an aspect of the body internally …

That too is how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.


1.6. The Charnel Ground Contemplations
Furthermore, suppose a mendicant were to see a corpse discarded in a charnel ground. And it had been dead for one, two, or three days, bloated, livid, and festering. They’d compare it with their own body: ‘This body is also of that same nature, that same kind, and cannot go beyond that.’

That too is how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.

Furthermore, suppose they were to see a corpse discarded in a charnel ground being devoured by crows, hawks, vultures, herons, dogs, tigers, leopards, jackals, and many kinds of little creatures. They’d compare it with their own body: ‘This body is also of that same nature, that same kind, and cannot go beyond that.’

That too is how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.

Furthermore, suppose they were to see a corpse discarded in a charnel ground, a skeleton with flesh and blood, held together by sinews …

A skeleton without flesh but smeared with blood, and held together by sinews …

A skeleton rid of flesh and blood, held together by sinews …

Bones rid of sinews scattered in every direction. Here a hand-bone, there a foot-bone, here a shin-bone, there a thigh-bone, here a hip-bone, there a rib-bone, here a back-bone, there an arm-bone, here a neck-bone, there a jaw-bone, here a tooth, there the skull …

White bones, the color of shells …

Decrepit bones, heaped in a pile …

Bones rotted and crumbled to powder. They’d compare it with their own body: ‘This body is also of that same nature, that same kind, and cannot go beyond that.’

And so they meditate observing an aspect of the body internally, externally, and both internally and externally. They meditate observing the body as liable to originate, as liable to vanish, and as liable to both originate and vanish. Or mindfulness is established that the body exists, to the extent necessary for knowledge and mindfulness. They meditate independent, not grasping at anything in the world.

That too is how a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body.
https://suttacentral.net/mn10/en/sujato

Wish you all success in all your endeavours. Goodbye!
lithos
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Re: is anapanasati concentration?

Post by lithos »

DooDoot wrote:
You should follow what the sutta says rather than follow authors. Best wishes. :smile:
It is always useful to learn from the authors, their experiences , the way they develope the teachings, but definitely the suttas are going to be my main frame of reference in spite of the fact that sometimes they are difficult to understand correctly and difficult to read due to repetitions.
I am happy to be in this forum, here there are people with a lot of knowledge and I hope to learn from all of you. Thanks.
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